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Brexit advice for staff at Warwick

Working at Warwick

We will continue to support all staff at Warwick, and to offer a global experience whatever the outcome of Brexit.

This guidance is for current staff at Warwick. If you are interested in working with us, please check our latest job vacancies.


Reminder for European staff: EU Settlement Scheme deadline

The University would like to remind its European staff that the deadline for applying to the EU Settlement Scheme is 30 June 2021.

This applies to any European nationals (except Irish nationals) who have been living in the UK before 11pm on 31 December 2020.

The EU Settlement Scheme is a UK Government scheme which will grant a UK immigration status of either settled or pre-settled status. You will need to obtain this status in order to continue to live in the UK beyond 30 June 2021.

Even if you have a permanent residence card, you will still need to apply for the scheme to gain a status under UK law. The scheme is free to apply.

You won’t be required to produce evidence for the University that you have applied and we won’t need to perform a new right to work check for you after 30 June 2021. If you change employer after 30 June 2021 you will be required to show you hold this status to the new employer.

Find out more about the EU Settlement Scheme

How to apply

Working in or travelling to the UK

European nationals already living in the UK by 31 December 2020 

  1. European nationals (except Irish nationals and those already with indefinite leave to remain) already living in the UK on 31 December 2020 should apply for settled/pre-settled status through the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS) before the deadline of 30 June 2021 if they have not already done so. The scheme is free to apply.
  2. Remember you need to show continuous residence in the UK over a five year period to be granted settled status. If you do not have this you will be granted pre-settled status and given five years to gain settled status.
  3. You must still apply even if you hold a permanent residence card.
  4. You will not need to apply for a UK visa under the new immigration system as you are able to apply for a settled/pre settled status through the EUSS.
  5. You will not be required to undertake a further right to work check as long as you remain in employment with no break in service and there is no need to advise us when you receive your settled or pre-settled status. It is your choice whether you wish to do so.
  6. You can still prove your rights in the UK until 30 June 2021 with your passport or national identity card. If you already have pre-settled or settled status, you can also choose to show this status.

See Gov.uk advice on the settlement scheme


European nationals arriving in the UK to work from 1 January 2021.

  1. Most European nationals (except Irish nationals) not already in the UK will need to obtain a visa in advance of arriving to be able to come to work in the UK from 1 January 2021 onwards.
  2. The new immigration system and rules apply equally to any European and non-European nationals who require a visa to work in the UK from January 2021.
  3. The new Immigration system provides visa routes for skilled and specialist occupations, but does not provide a specific route for general low-skilled work.
  4. Applicants will need to meet the criteria and score the required number of points for the relevant immigration visa.
  5. The main immigration route for skilled work is the Skilled Worker Visa.
  6. For academics and researchers, the Global Talent visaroute may be applicable.
  7. Visa applicants will need to pay the relevant visa fees. In addition, if they are coming to the UK for more than 6 months, they may have to pay the Immigration Health Surcharge of £624 p.a. which gives access the UK’s National Health Service (NHS).
  8. For new starters who require a visa to work in the UK please state this on the new offer form and contact Immigration for advice.

Immigration Support Scheme to help with visa costs

The Immigration Support Scheme has been put in place to provide support to help all its international staff who are required to apply and pay for visas to work at Warwick. By providing a reimbursement scheme up to a capped amount, we hope to reduce some of the financial burdens associated with obtaining visas for our employees and their families to come to, and remain in the UK by providing financial support.

Read details of the Immigration Support Scheme


European nationals visiting the UK from 1 January 2021

  1. European nationals will continue to be able to travel to the UK for holidays, short trips or academic visits of up to 6 months (but not work) without needing a visa. You will be able to cross the UK border using a valid passport. For academic visits of between 6 and 12 months you will usually need to apply for a Standard Visitor visa.
  2. At the border you must provide a valid passport or travel document. Your passport should be valid for the whole of your stay in the UK. You may also be asked to prove that you are eligible for the activities you want to do, you have arranged accommodation for your stay, you will leave at the end of your visit and you are able to support yourself and your dependents during your trip (or have funding from someone else to support you).
  3. Irish nationals are not affected by these changes will continue to be able to enter and live in the UK as they do now.
  4. Those visiting the UK should ensure they have adequate travel insurance that covers healthcare including cover for pre-existing medical conditions for the duration of their trip.
  5. European visitors with a non-UK driving licence will still be able to drive in the UK and will not need an international driving permit (IDP).
  6. Those taking their own vehicle to the UK with vehicle insurance issued in the EEA should carry an insurance green card or other valid proof of insurance.

Right to Work

Existing employees do not need to tell us of the outcome of their EU Settlement application, and will not be asked if they have applied. It is the responsibility of the individual to apply.

  • There will be no retrospective right to work checks undertaken on existing EEA employees.
  • EEA nationals already living in the UK who start work for a new employer can still show their passport or national identity card to provide evidence of right to work in the UK up until 30 June 2021.
  • Non-EEA citizens can still show their biometric residence document as evidence of right to work in the UK.

Visiting Europe after Brexit

If you want to visit Europe after Brexit, you should check your passport, health insurance, and driving documentation.


Passports

On the day you travel, you’ll need your passport to have at least six months left, and be less than 10 years old (even if it has six months or more left)


Visas

You will not need a visa for short trips to most EU and EEA countries and Switzerland known as the Schengen area. You’ll be able to stay for up to 90 days in any 180-day period. Different rules will apply to Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus and Romania. If you visit these countries, visits to other EU countries will not count towards the 90-day total. The 90-day limit for visa-free travel will begin on 1 January 2021. Any days you stay in Schengen countries before 1 January 2021 will not count towards the 90-day limit.

At border control, you may need to show a return or onward ticket, show you have enough money for your stay and use separate lanes from European citizens when queueing.

You may need a visa or permit to stay for longer, to work or study, or for business travel. You need to check the country you are travelling to for its own entry requirements and if you are required to have certain documents. You can check the entry requirements for the country you are visiting on the gov.uk website here.

If you provide services like legal services in a European country, you need to check that your professional qualifications will be recognised in the EU.

Travel to Ireland will not change after Brexit. You’ll also be able to work in Ireland in the same way as before.


Insurance

The University’s travel policy will be unaffected by Brexit and will continue to provide cover for business trips and study abroad (not personal travel). The policy covers emergency medical expenses only. The EHIC card will no longer be applicable after 31 December 2020 so you will need to arrange your own medical insurance to ensure you are covered for healthcare including cover for pre-existing medical conditions.


Data roaming

Changes to data roaming charges may be impacted by Brexit. Currently there is a capped rate, but this may change after the UK leaves the EU.


Driving in the EU after the UK leaves the EU

If you’re planning on driving in the EU, you will need some extra documents. See the Gov.uk advice on driving in Europe after Brexit.

After Brexit, if you’re taking your own vehicle, you will also need a ‘green card’ as proof of motor insurance if driving in the EU and a GB sticker.

If you require a Green Card in connection with driving for work reasons please email insuranceservices at warwick dot ac dot uk, giving 2 weeks’ notice.

The uncertainty surrounding Brexit is often a cause for worry and concern.

Employees of the University can access personal support from the University’s Employee Assistance Programme (EAP), Health Assured, on a confidential basis.

Health Assured provide a complete support network that offers expert advice and compassionate guidance 24/7, covering a wide range of issues.

Immigration Support Scheme to help with UK visa costs

The Immigration Support Scheme has been put in place to provide support to help all its international staff who are required to apply and pay for visas to work at Warwick. By providing a reimbursement scheme up to a capped amount, we hope to reduce some of the financial burdens associated with obtaining UK visas for our employees and their families to come to, and remain in the UK by providing financial support.

Read details of the Immigration Support Scheme

The uncertainty surrounding Brexit is likely to be a cause for worry and concern; there is support available for employees of the University via the University’s Employee Assistance Programme (EAP), Health Assured, on a confidential basis.

Health Assured provide a complete support network that offers expert advice and compassionate guidance 24/7, 365 days a year. Their services include unlimited access to counselling, including face-to-face counselling sessions and telephone counselling and legal information.

If you work with or line manage somebody that is affected by issues surrounding Brexit, please direct them to these web pages for advice and guidance.

Encourage them to make use of our free employee assistance programme. Be mindful that they may be going through a hard time, and pressures outside of work can have an impact on them both personally and professionally.

Please direct concerned students and colleagues to these webpages for advice and guidance regarding Brexit.

You can also encourage them to seek support from Wellbeing Support Services.

We look forward to welcoming you

The University of Warwick is proud of our global community and our colleagues from the EU, and their families, are an important part of our campus.

Please explore our job vacancies and get in touch if you would like to work at the Warwick and move to the UK after the UK leaves the EU.

After 31 December 2020, most EU nationals (except Irish nationals) not already living in the UK will need to obtain a visa in advance of arriving to be able to come to work in the UK.

For many, a Skilled Worker visa may be the most appropriate visa route. Academic and research roles may also be eligible to apply for a Global Talent visa.

These and other visa routes are part of the new UK points based immigration system from 1 January 2021. The new rules apply equally to any EU and non EU citizens who require a visa to work in the UK. The new Immigration system provides routes for skilled and specialist work, but does not provide a route for general low-skilled work.

Visa applicants will need to pay the relevant visa fees. In addition, if you are coming to the UK for more than 6 months, you will have to pay the Immigration Health Surcharge of £624 p.a. which gives access the UK’s National Health Service (NHS).

 

For new starters who require a visa to work in the UK please discuss this with your recruiting department. You can also contact HR.Immigration for advice.

Find out more about the new UK Immigration System here


Immigration Support Scheme to help with UK visa costs

The Immigration Support Scheme has been put in place to provide support to help all its international staff who are required to apply and pay for visas to work at Warwick. By providing a reimbursement scheme up to a capped amount, we hope to reduce some of the financial burdens associated with obtaining visas for our employees and their families to come to, and remain in the UK by providing financial support.

Read details of the Immigration Support Scheme 


Right to Work

Current right to work in the UK checks conducted by an employer for EEA nationals will continue to apply until the 30 June 2021.

Non-EEA citizens who are family members of EEA nationals can still show their biometric residence document as evidence of right to work in the UK.


European nationals visiting the UK from 1 January 2021 

European nationals will continue to be able to travel to the UK for holidays, short trips or academic visits of up to 6 months (but not work) without needing a visa. You will be able to cross the UK border using a valid passport. For academic visits of between 6 and 12 months you will usually need to apply for a Standard Visitor visa.

At the border you must provide a valid passport or travel document. Your passport should be valid for the whole of your stay in the UK. You may also be asked to prove that you are eligible for the activities you want to do, you have arranged accommodation for your stay, you will leave at the end of your visit and you are able to support yourself and your dependents during your trip (or have funding from someone else to support you).

Irish nationals are not affected by these changes will continue to be able to enter and live in the UK as they do now.

Those visiting the UK should ensure they have adequate travel insurance that covers healthcare including cover for pre-existing medical conditions for the duration of their trip.

European visitors with a non-UK driving licence will still be able to drive in the UK and will not need an international driving permit (IDP).

Those taking their own vehicle to the UK with vehicle insurance issued in the EEA should carry an insurance green card or other valid proof of insurance.

Procurement

Further to advice provided in the run up to the previous withdrawal deadlines, departments should continue to review supply chain risks in order to be prepared in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

A no-deal Brexit will mean that goods from the EU will be considered imports (3rd country). Customs duties will come into force immediately for certain goods. Duty payments, if applicable, and customs declarations will need to be made when the goods enter the UK.

The University may be eligible for a number of customs reliefs dependent on the goods being imported and their intended use. Where the University is the “importer” it will be essential that necessary customs paperwork is in place and correctly completed in order to secure the reliefs where eligible. Retrospective application for customs relief should be avoided as cannot be guaranteed.

The Procurement Office continues to review risks across centrally managed approved supplier agreements, however it is essential that departments also consider the risks to their own supply chains and their exposure to negative impacts. The Procurement Office will offer support wherever possible.

Visit the Procurement web pages for further advice and guidance on preparing for Brexit.