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Taught MA Booklet 2008-9

Department of Classics and Ancient history

University of Warwick






Taught MA in Ancient Visual and Material Culture


Taught MA in the Visual and Material Culture of Ancient Rome


Handbook 2008/9



Contents

p.2 Outline, Organization

p.4 Timetable, Deadlines

p.5 Taught MA (Rome)

p.6 Language dossier

p.8 Dissertation


Taught MA in Ancient Visual and Material Culture


Outline

This taught MA course provides an overview of the scope of the visual and material culture of the ancient world, the ways in which it might be studied, and the questions that can be asked of it. The core module gives students an awareness of historiography and methodological issues affecting the study of the material culture of the ancient world as well as inviting them to consider the ways in which its study can contribute to our picture of antiquity. Optional modules allow students to develop their interests in particular aspects of the subject (art, epigraphy, numismatics, or an approved external option) in more depth, while a core language component provides the linguistic skills necessary to conduct further research. The 15,000-20,000-word dissertation provides the opportunity to deploy these skills in the context of a research project based on individual interests.


The MA will provide a thorough grounding to anyone considering further research in the fields of art, numismatics, or epigraphy, or working on an historical topic that involves the consideration of material evidence. It will also be of interest to students who wish to continue their study of the ancient world for an additional year, perhaps with the aim of subsequently entering a career in museums or curatorial work, or in education.



Organization

There are four taught elements, each worth 30 CATS points as well as a 15,000-20,000-word dissertation (60 CATS).


Core Module - 'Approaching Ancient Visual and Material Culture'
CX901-30

Year 1 of part-time programme

2-hour seminar every fortnight in terms 1-2, assessed by a 5,000 word essay on a topic of your choice.

Deadline for essay title to be approved by appropriate module tutor:

Friday 20th February 2009, 12 noon

Deadline for essay: Friday 13th March 2009, 12 noon


Core Module in a Language:

Year 1 or 2 of part-time programme

Ancient Greek or Latin; Italian, German, or French, at appropriate level, taught alongside undergraduates either within the Classics Dept, or in the Italian Dept or the Language centre, over the course of the whole academic year.

Advanced Ancient Language (module code tbc*): two 1 ½ hour papers in January and May/June. Translation and comment on set passages (to be chosen in consultation with module tutor) relating to ancient visual and material culture, covering a wider range of authors than usually read at undergraduate level.

Beginners’ Greek (CX 105)/ Latin (CX 108): four 55 minute tests (Week 6, Autumn Term; Week 1 & Week 6, Spring Term; Week 1, Summer Term (40%); one 2 hour exam in the summer term (60%); + language dossier.

Deadline for approval of language dossier by AC:

Friday 15th May 2009, 12 noon

Deadline for submission of language dossier:

Friday 12th June 2009, 12 noon

Greek Language and Literature (CX 208): two 1 hour tests, each worth 10% (start of Term 2; start of Term 3); one 3 hour exam in May/June, worth 80%, of the final mark; + language dossier.

Deadline for approval of language dossier by AC:

Friday 15th May 2009, 12 noon

Deadline for submission of language dossier:

Friday 12th June 2009, 12 noon


2 optional modules chosen from the following

(part-time students take one module in Year 1, the other in Year 2):

Art of the Ancient World (Dr Alexia Petsalis-Diomidis)

Ancient Numismatics (Dr Stanley Ireland; Prof Kevin Butcher)

Classical Epigraphy (Dr Alison Cooley, Dr Abigail Graham)

Approved external option

These are taught in 2-hour seminars held every other week throughout Terms 1 and 2 and are assessed by a 5,000-word essay on a topic chosen in consultation with the lecturer responsible.


Optional module: Classical Epigraphy (CX900-30)

Assessment: 5,000 word essay

Deadline for essay title to be approved by AC:

Friday 13th March 2009, 12 noon

Deadline for essay:

Monday 20th April 2009, 12 noon


Optional module: Ancient Numismatics (CX902-30)

Deadline for essay title to be approved by SI or KB:

Friday 13th March 2009, 12 noon

Deadline for essay:

Friday 1st May 2009, 12 noon


Optional module: Art of the Ancient World (CX903-30)

Deadline for essay title to be approved by AP-D:

Friday 13th March 2009, 12 noon

Deadline for essay:

Friday 1st May 2009, 12 noon


Dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words (CX907-60)

The topic for this will be finalised during term 2 in conjunction with your supervisor. The dissertation must be submitted by Tuesday 1stSeptember 2009, 12 noon.


See Departmental Postgrad Handbook for full regulations re submission of work, extensions, and marking descriptors.



Timetable


Core Module ‘Approaching Ancient Visual and Material Culture’

Autumn & Spring Terms, fortnightly sessions, odd-numbered weeks (2 hours)

Fridays 13.00-15.00, S1.41

Week 9, autumn term, meeting AG at British Museum


Ancient Numismatics (Dr Stanley Ireland; Prof Kevin Butcher)

Autumn & Spring Terms, fortnightly sessions (2 hours)
Details to be confirmed with tutors.


Art of the Ancient World (Dr Alexia Petsalis-Diomidis)

Autumn & Spring Terms, fortnightly sessions, odd-numbered weeks (2 hours)

Tuesdays, 12.00-14.00, Westwood campus WT 0.02


Classical Epigraphy (Dr Alison Cooley)

Autumn & Spring Terms, fortnightly sessions, even-numbered weeks (2

hours)

Autumn term, Week 2: 10-12 in Library 2nd floor, seminar room;

thereafter 9-11 in H3.22


Language Classes

Please consult your tutors for the times: Margaret Midgley for Beginners’ Latin/ Greek; Latin LL, Greek LL; Alison Cooley/Kevin Butcher/Alexia Petsalis-Diomidis for Advanced Language, depending on passages chosen.


Essay Deadlines:


Core Module: 5,000 word essay Friday 13th March 2009, 12 noon


Numismatics Module: 5,000 word essay Friday 1st May 2009, 12 noon


Art Module: 5,000 word essay Friday 1st May 2009, 12 noon


Epigraphy Module: 5,000 word essay Monday 20th April 2009, 12 noon


Language Dossier Friday 12th June 2009, 12 noon


Dissertation Tuesday 1st September 2009



Taught MA in the Visual and Material Culture of Ancient Rome


Core module - Approaching Ancient Visual and Material Culture (as above)

Core language module (as above)

One optional module out of Classical Epigraphy, Art of the Ancient World, Ancient Numismatics (as above). A second optional module should also be attended during the autumn term, in case a place is not awarded on the BSR course.

BSR City of Rome course: seminar presentation and 5,000 word essay (assessed at BSR)

Dissertation 15-20,000 words (as above).



Taught MA in Ancient Visual and Material Culture

Taught MA in the Visual and Material Culture of Ancient Rome


Language Dossier

The aim of the language dossier is to show that you can apply the linguistic skills you have acquired to the study of ancient visual and material culture. It is worth 15% of the final mark for the language module (the examination makes up the other 85%) and is due in by Friday 12th June 2009, 12 noon. The contents of your dossier must first be approved by the Taught M.A. co-ordinator, Alison Cooley, by Friday 15th May 2009, 12 noon. The Advanced Language module does not require a language dossier; all other language options do.


What a Dossier should contain

3 passagesin the language you have been learning together with either a translation or commentary setting them in the context of the course. The total length of each piece including commentary will be up to about 500 words.


Some examples of suitable material are given below. It will be best to try to achieve a cross-section of different types of evidence. If you think of other possible examples, do ask to see if they are suitable.


For Ancient Greek/Latin

An inscription (or 2 or 3 similar ones if very short) with a translation and explanation of any abbreviations, along with a short commentary setting it into context, explaining where it was found or is likely to have been set up, dating it, and explaining its relevance to the study of ancient material culture.

1 or more object/s where text and image are combined, with a translation of the text and an appraisal of the effect of this combination of text and image (eg a series of coins with legends, a funerary or votive relief, a statue dedication).

A passage from an ancient author which gives an account of an artist, statue, monument or site (eg from Vitruvius, Pliny NH, Pausanias) along with a translation (if short) and a commentary drawing out the important elements of the passage and commenting on any difficulties in translating terms. Also a brief account of the author’s date, context etc.


Your choice of passages will depend on your levels of attainment in the language (beginners will probably select simple inscriptions, or short combinations of text and image, and be expected to comment on rather than translate longer passages, those studying at higher levels will be expected to choose more complex/longer passages and discuss their problems of translation and interpretation more).


In brief, this exercise involves you selecting gobbets of the sort you might find on an exam paper, and writing an account of them.

For Modern Languages

A letter written in the language introducing yourself to a museum curator or superintendent of an archaeological area, along with correct addresses (found on the web) and a request to see or visit particular material/sites

Either a real or made-up example of a museum label or catalogue entry for an object, along with an illustration of the object, with a translation and an explanation of any striking features – eg the audience and issues the label addresses, other factors which could have been included, its context if part of an exhibition catalogue

A magazine or newspaper article on an archaeological/art topic, with a commentary summarising the content of the article and referring to particular words to show you have understood it (look in the library for foreign magazines, newspapers, as well as on the web).



Dissertation: Guidelines

The dissertation should be between 15,000 and 20,000 words, including footnotes but excluding bibliography and any appendices (see below re appendices). Penalties will be imposed for work less than 14,000 and more than 21,000 words, as outlined in pg handbook (a deduction of 3% from mark per 1,000 words over/under the word-limit).


Deadline: Tuesday 1st September 2009, noon.

Format:

The dissertation should consist of the following, in this order:

title page along the following model (font size & layout as you prefer)

Title of Thesis

Candidate Name and student number

Thesis submitted as part of the requirements for the Taught MA in Ancient Visual and Material Culture

[OR “Thesis submitted as part of the requirements for the Taught MA in the Visual and Material Culture of Ancient Rome”]



Department of Classics and Ancient History

University of Warwick”

Date

Word Count

table of contents (giving page refs for list of illustrations, intro, chapters, bibl, any appendices)

list of figures (give brief description, museum inv no. and source of illustration)

introduction

chapters

appendices (if included, see below)

bibliography

illustrations: numbered as fig 1 etc. These can either be placed in a section at the end of the thesis, or integrated into the text. Remember to give a brief caption.

Notes: it is preferable to present these as footnotes, though end notes at the end of chapter can be used if necessary. Use them primarily for references to ancient and modern works. Ensure that you are consistent in use of either name/date, name/title system of referencing. For further info see pg handbook.

Binding: The thesis should be either soft bound or spiral bound.


Appendices

For most theses appendices should not be included. Only include an appendix if you have produced a catalogue as part of the dissertation, or have extensive amounts of primary material (ancient texts, manuscripts, catalogue of inscriptions) which are not otherwise easily accessible.