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Classical Civilisation (Q820)

 

CLASSICAL CIVILISATION (BA)

Full-time 2019 entry, ABB, IB 34

This wide-ranging, flexible degree is devoted to the study of the literature, history, philosophy, languages, art and archaeology of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds.


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The course allows you to choose from a wide range of topics - such as gender and sexuality in antiquity, democracy and imperialism, ancient global history, Roman laughter, or the history of medicine - and to develop skills in literary criticism and historical analysis as well as in theoretical and interdisciplinary approaches to the ancient world.

Teaching is varied, innovative and interactive, and our students benefit from many hands-on learning experiences, including recreating the experience of a Greek symposium, visiting historical sites and museums in the UK. You can also join the Classics Society and take part in our annual classical play, which is staged at a professional theatre and played to public audiences of over a thousand people. You'll take either Latin or Ancient Greek in your first year, and study four modules per year.

All our degrees involve core modules in your first year. In subsequent years, you build on what you have learnt through a choice of modules, which allow you to engage in your own way with the civilisation of the Ancient Mediterranean. You are required to complete one module in an ancient language in your first year.

Second and final year students may take one 30-CAT module or two 15-CAT modules from outside the department (e.g. from the Institute for Advanced Teaching and Learning or another academic dept) in place of an optional module.

You will study Classical Civilisation in a variety of ways – through lectures, seminars, and language classes, and, in your final year, through a dissertation on a topic of your own choice, with guidance from your departmental supervisor.

Contact hours

You'll take four modules, each with 2-3 contact hours per week (more for your language module/s).

Class size

Class sizes vary from 6 to 80. Honours modules are capped at 60.

You will take four modules each year, the assessment of which is generally equally divided between essays submitted during the year and exams in the summer (100% exam for language modules). Your second and final years contribute equally to your final degree classification.

On our Classical Civilisation with Study in Europe degree you will spend your third year studying classical subjects in Italian at one of our partner universities (currently in Venice, Rome, Bologna or Padua) and then return for your final year at Warwick.

Alternatively, you may choose to spend a year at our partner university of Monash, Australia, at the end of your second year. The Study Abroad Team based in the Office for Global Engagement offers support for these activities, and the Department's dedicated Study Abroad Co-ordinator can provide more specific information and assistance.

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A level ABB to include grade C/grade 4 in GCSE Mathematics (or equivalent).

IB 34 to include grade C/grade 4 in GCSE Mathematics (or equivalent).

You will also need to meet our English Language requirements.

Contextual data and differential offers: Warwick may make differential offers to students in a number of circumstances. These include students participating in the Realising Opportunities programme, or who meet two of the contextual data criteria. Differential offers will be one or two grades below Warwick’s standard offer (to a minimum of BBB).

  • Access Courses: Access to HE Diploma (QAA- recognised) including appropriate subjects with distinction grades in level 3 units. Candidates must meet essential subject requirements.
  • Warwick International Foundation Programme (IFP) All students who successfully complete the Warwick IFP and apply to Warwick through UCAS will receive a guaranteed conditional offer for a related undergraduate programme (selected courses only). For full details of standard offers and conditions visit the IFP website.
  • We welcome applications from students with other internationally recognised qualifications. For more information please visit the international entry requirements page.
  • Taking a gap year Applications for deferred entry welcomed.

    Interviews We do not typically interview applicants. Offers are made based on your UCAS form which includes predicted and actual grades, your personal statement and school reference.

    Open Days All students who have been offered a place are invited to visit. Find out more about our main University Open Days and other opportunities to visit us.

Year 1
Greek Culture and Society

You will receive a grounding in the rich panorama of Ancient Greek culture, during which your appreciation of art, literature and thought will be complemented by an understanding of the cultural contexts in which they flourished. From this foundation, you will pursue a specialism, choosing from subjects as varied as myths and religion, performing arts, and political and societal structures. Using primary sources, you will hone your research and analytical skills to consider the differences and continuities between Ancient Greek culture and your own.


Roman Culture and Society

This module allows you to explore how the Romans shaped the modern world through their literary and material cultures. Analysing how different civilisations contributed to the concept of ‘Roman’, using an eclectic range of evidence, from high literature and ancient graffiti, to the monuments and religious artefacts of Ancient Rome. This strong foundation in how evidence from the ancient world is evaluated will contribute to your understanding of the development of culture in ancient and modern contexts.


Latin Language

This introductory module will teach you the fundamental grammatical structures of Latin through explicit, systematic exposure and explanation, graded exercises and translation. By the end of your course, you can expect to have a good knowledge of Latin vocabulary and syntax, and the ability to read and translate from Latin, with an understanding of an inflected language. You will be encouraged to develop your appreciation of the influence of Latin on English, and to cultivate your capacity for logical analysis. Many students progress to the study of the module Latin Language and Literature, with access to unadapted versions of the works of authors such as Cicero and Virgil.


OR

Greek Language

This introductory module will teach you the fundamental elements of Ancient Greek in a logical and systematic way. It will enable you to read and translate passages of adapted Greek with accuracy and confidence. By the end of your course, you can expect to have a good knowledge of Greek vocabulary and syntax, with the ability to read and translate from Greek, you will have an understanding of an inflected language. You will be encouraged to develop your appreciation of the influence of Greek on English, and cultivate your capacity for logical analysis. Many students go on to study the module Greek Language and Literature, through the work of authors such as Lysias, Euripides and Homer.


Introduction to Greek and Roman History

You will be introduced to the central themes of Greek and Roman history; from the Greek Archaic Period to the beginning of the Roman Empire. You will gain a broad chronological understanding of the ancient world, and knowledge of the main types of evidence and methodologies used to analyse its historical events and cultural practices. You will simultaneously gain study skills in analysing evidence, crafting an argument and presenting your ideas coherently and fluently.


OR

Philosophy in Practice

On this project-based module, you will put your knowledge of philosophy into practice by applying what you have learned to current affairs and presenting your reasoning through informed and authoritative debate. Taking a contemporary topic of interest, such as the ethics of war, reproductive ethics or assisted suicide, you’ll identify and reconstruct the arguments both for and against, and deploy your logical and interpretive skills to present an informed position both orally and in writing. Your research project will also see you making efficient use of library resources, working collaboratively with your peers, and gaining confidence and professionalism in the skills of presentation and debate.


AND

Ancient Philosophy

You will learn about Ancient Greek thinkers such as Parmenides, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle, focusing on metaphysics, epistemology and ethics. You will see contrast and continuity between treatments of these topics in the ancient literature and you will gain a foundation for further study of Greek philosophy, and of contemporary philosophical literature. You will develop skills in critical analysis, presenting rigorous arguments, oral and written, and learn how to discuss a topic with clarity, patience and sensitivity to the views of others.


Year 2
Hellenistic World

The campaigns of Alexander the Great transformed the Greek world, creating an empire that stretched from the Adriatic to the Himalayas. Through this module, you will explore the political histories, power structures, cultural developments and ideologies of the period, and gain critical insight into the evidence from which our understanding of Hellenistic culture and history is constructed. This will lead to an increased appreciation of how the Hellenistic world helped shape the Roman world and beyond.


Year 3
Selection of optional modules that current students are studying:

Sexuality and Gender in Antiquity; Roman Laughter; The Roman Empire from Tiberius to Hadrian; Ancient Global History; Politics and Poetics in Greek and Roman Literature; The Vulnerable Body in Roman Literature and Thought; Democracy and Imperialism; Rhetorics; The History of Medicine; Receptions of Antiquity, East and West; The Transformation of Roman Society under Augustus.

Our graduates have gone on to work for organisations including: EY (formerly Ernst and Young), Amnesty International USA, Museum of London, Ofcom, Civil Service, Marks & Spencer, GlaxoSmithKline, Oxford University Press, Cancer Research UK.

Examples of our graduates’ job roles include: Events Co-ordinator, Public Relations Consultant, Tax Advisor, Digital Editorial Assistant, Trainee Police Officer, Data Analyst. Others have chosen to pursue postgraduate study.

A level ABB to include grade C/grade 4 in GCSE Mathematics (or equivalent).

IB 34 to include grade C/grade 4 in GCSE Mathematics (or equivalent).

UCAS Code
Q820

Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Duration
3 years full time

4-10 years part time - find out more about the part time course

Start Date
24 September 2019

Location of study
University of Warwick, Coventry

Tuition fees
Find out more about fees and funding

Additional costs
There may be costs associated with other items or services such as academic texts, course notes, and trips associated with your course. Possible costs are estimated as follows:

Year One: £50 textbooks + £15 trip

Year Two: £120 textbooks, £20 trip

Year Four: £25 printing/binding of dissertation, £120 textbooks, £20 trip

This information is applicable for 2019 entry.

Given the interval between the publication of courses and enrolment, some of the information may change. It is important to check our website before you apply. Please read our terms and conditions to find out more.

Classical Civilisation with Study in Europe
Ancient History and Classical Archaeology
Ancient History and Classical Archaeology with Study in Europe
Classics
Classics (Ancient Greek) with Study in Europe
Classics (Latin) with Study in Europe
Classics and English
Italian and Classics