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Lecture 7: The Symposium

Sources

Xenophon, Symposium

Plato, Symposium

Timaeus FrGrHist 566 F149: `...in Agrigentum there is a house called `the trireme' for the following reason. Some young men were getting drunk in it, and became feverish with intoxication, off their heads to such an extent that they supposed they were in a trireme, sailing through a dangerous tempest; they became so befuddled as to throw all the furniture and fittings out of the house as though at sea, thinking that the pilot had told them to lighten the ship because of the storm. A great many people, meanwhile were gathering at the scene and started to carry off the discarded property, but even then the youths did not pause from their lunacy. On the following day the generals turned up at the house, and charges were brought against them. Still sea-sick, they answered to the officials' questioning that in their anxiety over the storm they had been compelled to jettison their superfluous cargo by throwing it into the sea.'

Secondary material
  • M. Jameson in O.Murray and S.Price edd. The Greek City from Homer to Alexander (Oxford, 1990)
  • François Lissarrague, The Aesthetics of the Greek Banquet (Princeton, 1990)
  • *Murray, O. Sympotica (Oxford 1990)
  • *J.Davidson, Courtesans... c.2, index sv symposium