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Syllabus & Coursework (Greek and/or Latin language)

Additional prescribed editions for students offering the module with original Greek:

  • Homer Iliad IX, ed. Jasper Griffin (Oxford) - you will need to buy this
  • Pindar, Pythian 1, ed. Snell-Maehler, Teubner (text & commentary supplied as a course extract)
  • Herodotus 3.80–4, ed. Hude, Oxford (text & commentary supplied as course extract)
  • Gorgias, Encomium of Helen (text supplied as course extract)
Additional prescribed editions for students offering the module with original Latin:


  • Ovid Metamorphoses 3 ed. A. R. Henderson (Bristol Classical Press) - you will need to buy this
  • Statius Thebaid 9 (Loeb edition, 2nd volume) - you will need to buy this
Reduced prescriptions for students offering the module with both original Greek and Latin (editions as above):


Greek:

  • Homer Iliad 9; Pindar, Pythian 1

Latin:

  • Ovid Metamorphoses 3


Term 1 & 2 Coursework – Classics/English&Latin with Greek/Latin:


PRACTICAL CRITICISMS

 

Q800 Students taking this module will be required to offer two practical criticisms in lieu of an essay for one of the coursework assessment points, as follows:

Q800 Latin students: 2 practical criticisms in term 1 instead of an essay

Q800 Greek students: 2 practical criticisms in term 2 instead of an essay

Q800 Greek and Latin students: 2 practical criticisms in EITHER term 1 OR term 2 instead of one of the essays.

Term 1: Latin

Write on TWO of the following THREE passages, answering the question set with specific reference to the Latin text, while paying attention to the guidelines for gobbets.
You will need to consult commentaries and cite and discuss relevant bibliography, presenting each answer as a mini-essay with bibliography and detailed referencing to the text specified.

The two practical criticisms should be submitted, both electronically and in hard copy, as one document of about 2,500 words in total.

1. Ovid, Metamorphoses 3.173-205

Question: Analyse the transformation of Actaeon here, paying close attention both to the interaction between content and form in this passage, and to the role Actaeon plays in Metamorphoses 3 as a whole.

Extra bibliography (also see bibliography tab):

Feldherr, A. 'Metamorphosis and sacrifice in Ovid's Theban narrative' Materiali e discussioni dei testi classici 38 (1997) 25-55.
Gantz, T. Early Greek Myth (Baltimore, 1993, 478-81)
Heath, J. Actaeon, the Unmannerly Intruder (New York, 1992)
Leach, E.W. 'Metamorphoses of the Actaeon myth in Romano-Campanian painting' Mitteilungen des Deutsches Archaologisches Instituts 88 (1981) 307-27.
Schlam, C. 'Diana and Actaeon: metamorphoses of a myth' Classical Antiquity 3 (1984) 82-109


2. Virgil, Aeneid 9.410-445

Question: Why does Virgil choose the moment of Nisus' and Euryalus' deaths, after a reckless failed mission, to make his most emphatic and 'imperialistic' intervention in the epic?

Extra bibliography (also see bibliography tab):
Casali, S. 'Nisus and Euryalus: exploiting the contradictions in Vergil's Doloneia' Harvard Studies in Classical Philology 102 (2004) 319-54.
Fitzgerald,G.J. 'Nisus and Euryalus: a paradigm of futile behaviour and the tragedy of youth' in J.R.C.Martyn (ed.) Cicero and Virgil: Studies in Honour of H.Hunt (Amsterdam, 1972: 114-37).
Hardie, P. Virgil, Aeneid IX (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics commentary, Cambridge, 1994)
Meban, D. 'The Nisus and Euryalus episode and Roman friendship' Phoenix 63 (2009) 239-59.
Pavlock, B. 'Epic and tragedy in Vergil's Nisus and Euryalus episode' Transactions of the American Philological Association 115 (1985) 207-24.
Saylor, C. 'Group vs. individual in Vergil Aeneid IX' Latomus 49 (1990) 88-94.


3. Ovid, Metamorphoses 3.474-98

Question: How does Ovid shape and drive Narcissus' identity crisis in his poetry? How is this scene pivotal for the book as a whole?

Extra bibliography (also see bibliography tab):
Elsner, J. 'Naturalism and the erotics of the gaze: intimations of Narcissus' in N.B.Kampen (ed.) Sexuality in Ancient Art (Cambridge, 1996, 247-61)
Hardie, P. 'Lucretius and the delusion of Narcissus' Materiali e discussioni dei testi classici 20-21 (1988) 71-89.
Hardie, P. Ovid's Poetics of Illusion (Cambridge, 2002)
Hinds, S. Allusion and Intertext (Cambridge, 1998, 5-8)
Loewenstein, J. Responsive Readings. Versions of Echo in Pastoral, Epic and the Jonsonian Masque (New Haven-London, 1984).
Rimell, V. Ovid's Lovers. Desire, Difference and the Poetic Imagination (Cambridge, 2006: read introduction)


Click on the following link for advice on writing practical criticisms (distributed in class in Term 1, 2016): (Word Document) Prac crits advice


Term 2: Greek

Write on TWO of the following THREE passages, answering the question set with specific reference to the Greek text, while paying attention to the guidelines for literary gobbets.
You will need to consult commentaries and cite and discuss relevant bibliography, presenting each answer as a mini-essay with bibliography and detailed referencing to the text specified.

The two practical criticisms should be submitted, both electronically and in hard copy, as one document of about 2,500 words in total.

1. Iliad 9.308–55.

Question: 'Achilles is out of sync with the underpinnings of the Iliad's social structures.' Assess this view.

2. Pindar, Pythian 1.1–33.

Question: ‘Pindar’s imagery and themes merely serve as overblown flattery.’ Assess this view.

3. Gorgias, Encomium of Helen sections 8–14.

Question: What consequences are there if we are not persuaded by Gorgias’ account of the power of persuasion?