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Assessment

Assessment of the module for all students is 50% for work submitted during the course and 50% for a 2-hour exam in the May/June session of examinations. Overlap should be avoided between pre-submitted essays and the questions answered in the exam. Lack of breadth may be penalised.

Non-assessed work:

During the first half of the autumn term, students will also be required to produce a piece of non-assessed work. This will consist of practice in writing a gobbet, a skill required for the examination. The gobbet answer should be handed in during the lectures in Week 3. It will be marked and returned to you.

Seminars:

Note that all students are required to attend seminars, and are expected to prepare for and to be able to take part in discussions. Seminar groups will be announced in due course, and worksheets distributed.

Assessed Essays:

Students are required to produce TWO essays during the module (length 2,500 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography). The normal expected length for assessed essays is ‘c. 2,500 words’, which in practice means 2250-3000 words (including footnotes not including bibliography). Students are required to declare a word count on the cover sheet. Essays will be penalized for being too short or too long. Use 12-point font and double-space your text.

Essays must include footnotes where appropriate, and a bibliography of works cited. They should be word-processed. Due attention should be given to literacy (both spelling and grammar). Titles and submission dates follow below. Please refer to the departmental handbook and the documents ‘Advice on writing essays’ and the Style guide for further information about assessment criteria and marking. These are available online. The second assessed essay for Q800 Classics students will be closely focused upon the set texts, and require detailed linguistic analysis of the Latin original.

For titles and submission deadlines, see essays.

Criteria for assessment

  • Presentation: Marks will be awarded for good English expression; points will be deducted for poor presentation, including poor grammar and spelling. Marks will be awarded for correct presentation of footnotes and bibliography
  • Clarity of analysis: Marks will be awarded for work which is organised coherently on the basis of arguments, and deducted for work which is incoherent or presents a mass of amorphous material. The case the student is arguing should be clear to the assessor in every paragraph - don't fall automatically into a chronological arrangement of your material, or a line by line examination of a text, unless you are making a specific point, narrowly argued, about development or change over time.
  • Primary data: Marks will be awarded for good use of a range of ancient texts and other materials – inscriptions, images, coins, archaeology etc. - and deducted for unsubstantiated arguments and opinions. Marks will be awarded for pertinent quotation and for thoughtfulness about its usefulness as evidence. Don’t use quotations of primary materials or images merely as illustrations. Think about what contribution they make to your argument, what role they play as evidence, where the producers of the text or artefact are 'coming from'.
  • Secondary material: Marks will be awarded for isolating the main issues and debates in modern scholarship on the subject. Marks will be deducted for overdependence on a single unquestioned modern authority. Think also about where modern scholars are 'coming from', e.g. by reading reviews of their work from the websites of JSTOR, BMCR, or Project Muse. Marks will not be awarded for essays that mainly of quotations from secondary sources instead of your own words.
  • Originality and Sophistication: Marks will be awarded for thoughtfulness, well-founded scepticism and original ideas which attempt to surpass the issues and debates found in modern discussions in order to take the argument in a new direction.

Refer to the departmental essay-writing checklist in order to help ensure that you meet these criteria.

Class descriptors

  • 2nd YEAR - 1st class essay will present a reasoned and analytical argument throughout, its individual points presented in a manner that displays a logical flow between paragraphs and in good English. It will demonstrate an intelligent and critical use of primary and secondary sources; the referencing of these will be clear and accurate. The essay will also display an ability on the part of the student to advance ideas that display a considerable degree of sophistication and some degree of originality.
  • 3rd YEAR - 1st class essay will present a reasoned and analytical argument throughout, its individual points presented in a manner that displays a logical flow between paragraphs and in good English. It will demonstrate intelligent interpretation of appropriate primary sources and the ability to identify, characterise, and interrogate appropriate secondary literature on the subject; it may also demonstrate the ability to situate the topic within a broader intellectual/academic context. The referencing of both primary and secondary sources will be clear and accurate. The essay will also display an ability on the part of the student to advance ideas that display a considerable degree of sophistication and some degree of originality.
  • 2nd YEAR - Upper 2nd class essay will present a reasoned and analytical argument, its individual points presented in a manner that displays a logical flow between paragraphs and in good English. It will demonstrate an intelligent use of primary and secondary sources; the referencing of these will be clear and accurate.
  • 3rd YEAR - Upper 2nd class essay will present a reasoned and analytical argument, its individual points presented in a manner that displays a logical flow between paragraphs and in good English. It will demonstrate an interpretation of appropriate primary sources and the ability to identify and characterise appropriate secondary literature on the subject; the referencing of both primary and secondary sources will be clear and accurate.
  • 2nd YEAR - Lower 2nd class essay may rely heavily upon narrative, from which salient points of argument will, or are expected, to emerge. It will demonstrate a moderate use of primary and secondary sources and include referencing to these which is clear and accurate. It may also answer only part of the question.
  • 3rd YEAR - Lower 2nd class essay may rely heavily upon narrative, from which salient points of argument will, or are expected, to emerge. It will demonstrate a moderate capacity to interpret primary and secondary sources and include referencing to these which is clear and accurate. It may also answer only part of the question.
  • 2nd YEAR - 3rd class essay will either 1) deviate from the question set in whole or at significant points; or 2) will be presented in a manner that shows few signs of coherent thought and in a form that is ill-referenced and poorly formulated.
  • 3rd YEAR - 3rd class essay will either 1) deviate from the question set in whole or at significant points; or 2) will be presented in a manner that shows few signs of coherent thought and in a form that is ill-referenced and poorly formulated; or 3) show little acumen in interpreting primary sources and/or shows little recognition of appropriate secondary literature on the subject.
  • 2nd YEAR - fail essay will display considerable ineptitude in terms of knowledge, essay-structure, use of English, and referencing.
  • 3rd YEAR – fail essay will display considerable ineptitude in terms of knowledge, essay-structure, use of English, and referencing; or 2) offer little or no interpretation of primary sources and no recognition of appropriate secondary literature on the subject.

Submission of Essays

Essays should be submitted online via Tabula (http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/classics/students/esubmission/) together with the Dept Cover Sheet before 12 noon on the deadline date. Anonymity of marking is an adopted principle of the University for both assessed essays and examinations, so DO NOT put your name on your work. By University regulation, late essays will attract a penalty of 5 marks for each day they are late, excluding weekends (from 12.01 on the day they are due to 12.00 the next day is counted as 1 day).

Deadlines

  • Non-assessed gobbet: hand this in during lectures in Week 3.
  • First assessed essay: 12 noon, Thursday 7 December 2017.
  • Second assessed essay: 12 noon, Friday 9 March 2018.

Essays must be submitted via Tabula by the deadline, together with the Dept Cover Sheet.

Extensions to Essay Deadlines:

Applications for an extension of the essay-deadline are only allowed in exceptional circumstances – well-documented medical reasons etc. Any such application should be made to the Head of Dept (Prof Alison Cooley) or Director of Undergraduate Studies (Prof Suzanne Frey-Kupper, autumn term; Dr David Fearn, spring term) or Deputy Head of Dept (Prof Kevin Butcher) well before the deadline. Problems with e.g. printers, getting hold of books, bunching-up of essay-deadlines etc. are not considered acceptable excuses. Only in exceptional circumstances will an extension be allowed beyond one week.

Feedback:

Feedback on essays will be returned to students within 20 working days. Essays will be handed back individually, when there will be a chance to discuss them. It is essential that students attend these tutorials. Keep a copy of your essay, and re-read it before your feedback session. You will also find it helpful when re-reading your essay to complete the departmental ‘Essay checklist’ template, which can be found online, and which will help you to understand how you can improve your work.

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism, defined as ‘the attempt to pass off someone else’s work as one’s own’ is a variety of cheating or fraud. It is taken very seriously by the University and students who are caught can suffer penalties which are extremely detrimental to their career. Please see the Dept Ug Handbook for more details.

To avoid any confusion however you should take special care with two things:

1: Cite the sources you are using

2: Use quotation marks for the quotes you are quoting.

Avoiding plagiarism

All written work produced for assessment must be entirely yours. Your work will often use material covered in lectures and seminars, but your work must demonstrably be your own representation of that material. You must not quote from other people’s work word-for-word without acknowledging this by use of “quotation-marks”. If you present someone else’s thoughts, words, or other work as your own, then you will have committed plagiarism. In general it is poor practice to scatter quotations from other scholars throughout your essay; you should attempt to rephrase what other people have said in your own words, and then also include a reference to the source of your ideas in a footnote. When taking notes from journals and books, make sure that you indicate clearly in your notes, using quotation marks, if you’re copying directly word-for-word. This will ensure that you do not inadvertently reproduce someone else’s words in your essay. In general, however, the best practice is to paraphrase and analyse as you read and make notes so that your notes do not simply copy out chunks of other people’s work. You should also avoid referring to what a lecturer has said without finding out for yourself on what his/her ideas are based. You may cite primary sources on handouts.

Rules for avoiding plagiarism

Good study technique, writing style and correct referencing of quotations will help you to avoid unintentional plagiarism. If you follow these simple rules you will always be safe:

  • Always take down a detailed reference for each text that you read and take notes from.
  • While copying quotations, make sure you clearly mark them as quotations in your working notes.
  • Gather and use your own examples whenever you want to support a particular view.
  • Ensure that all quotations are surrounded by quotation marks.
  • Ensure that your references can be used to locate the original source text.

Exam:

The exam will be divided into two parts: students will be required

  1. to comment on two 'gobbets' (from a choice of six) – one text and one artefact - from a choice of six
  2. to write two essays (from a choice of seven titles).

Q800 Classics students will translate and comment on two text ‘gobbets’ (from a choice of six), and write one essay (from a choice of seven titles).