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EN964 Translation Studies in Theory and Practice

Convenor: Dr Chantal Wright

2018-19, Term 1, Day and time TBC, Room TBC. This module begins in Week One.

This is the core theory module for MA in Literary Translation Studies and MA in Translation and Cultures students and will run each autumn. Please see the Library's Talis Aspire reading list system for the up-to-date 2018-19 reading list, which will be available by July 31, 2018. Preparatory reading and useful anthologies are suggested below.

This module is also open to any MA student with an interest in Translation Studies and can function as a core theory module for MAEL students; students from MAW, MAWL, the MA in Philosophy and the Arts and others are also welcome.

Aims: This module seeks to provide an overview of the development of Translation Studies as a discipline since the 1970s but also of “pre-scientific” thought on translation dating from the classical era; the module simultaneously provides an overview of translation theory and explores how translation theory relates to translation practice and to the study of translated texts.

Assessment: Students will submit a final essay on a topic that they will devise themselves in consultation with the module convenor. The length of the final essay will depend on the student’s "home" MA programme and pathway through it. MALTS and MATC students will submit an essay of 6,000 words. The preferred referencing style for this module is Harvard, in line with subject norms for Translation Studies. MALTS students will be required to use Harvard style; students from other programmes may choose to use Harvard but are also welcome to use the preferred referencing style for their home programme if this is mandated or if they feel more comfortable doing so. Consistency and accuracy in the application of a referencing system are ultimately more important than whether a student uses Harvard, MLA, MHRA or any other commonly used scholarly referencing system.


Preparatory Reading and Useful Anthologies

Bassnett, S., 2014. Translation Studies. 4th ed. London and New York: Routledge.

**Boase-Beier, J., 2010. Who needs theory? In: A. Fawcett, K. Guadarrama García and R. Hyde Parker, eds. 2010. Translation: Theory and Practice in Dialogue. London: Continuum. pp. 25-38. [Please read this text before the Week One seminar.]

Lefevere, A., 1992. Translation/History/Culture: A Sourcebook. London and New York: Routledge.

Munday, J., 2012. Introducing Translation Studies: Theories and Applications. 4th ed or a previous edition. London and New York: Routledge.

**Venuti, L. ed., 2012. The Translation Studies Reader. 3rd ed. London and New York: Routledge. [module set text, available for purchase in the campus bookstore]

Weissbort, D. and Eysteinsson, A. eds., 2006. Translation Theory and Practice: A Historical Reader. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Wright, C., 2016. Literary Translation. Abingdon: Routledge.