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Assessment

Assessment

100% assessed: 1 x 3000 word essay (30%); 1 x 5000 word essay (50%); Wiki (20%)
50/50: 1 x 3000 word essay (30%); 1 x 3-hour exam (50%); Wiki (20%)

The first essays will be due in week 2 of term 2; the second (where applicable) in week 2 of term 3. Wiki pages should be complete before the last class of Term 2, although you will be working on them over the course of the year.

Please follow this link for the full essay deadline list (Excel Spreadsheet) for further details.

WIKI pages

One aim of the course is to get students using archival and primary research sources and to this end every class participant will complete a “wiki” page (think Wikipedia) on an eighteenth-century object or concept. These research assignments, will be written up in the form of a WIKI page (think “Wikipedia”) linked to the entries of other class members. Possible stubs for these pages include: potatoes, wigs, cross-dressing, contraception, silk, weddings, printing, air balloons, hack-writing, sport, etc. Research for this page will involve reading original sources online (searching ECCO, EEBO and other databases available through the library), taking note of the role one’s object or practice plays in course texts, and finding or creating images associated with the object in question. You will be given some training in doing primary research with eighteenth-century databases. This WIKI page will be graded as 20% of the course. You may see the WIKI online and already populated with the entries of students from last year by following this link: http://eighteenthcenturylit.pbworks.com/w/page/68910549/FrontPage

The Exam:

The exam will be three hours long, with three sections A, B and C. You will write three answers of equal length (each answer carries equal marks). No books or other materials are permitted in the exam. Section A relates to authors and texts studied in term 1 of the course; section B relates to authors and texts studied in term 2 of the course and you may select one author. The last section will pose general questions requiring a comparative answer drawing on authors from any part of the course. Your exam essays should not repeat material from your first essay.