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Warwick announces the winner of the inaugural Warwick Prize for Women in Translation

Memoirs of a Polar Bear by Yoko Tawada, translated from German by American translator Susan Bernofsky and published by Portobello Books, has been announced as the winner of the inaugural Warwick Prize for Women in Translation. https://warwick.ac.uk/newsandevents/pressreleases/warwick_announces_the

Thu 16 November 2017, 13:47 | Tags: Prizes, awards, long / shortlist, Public Event, Media

Pop-up International Women's Literature Reading Group

Novelist Sarah Moss and literary translator Chantal Wright from the Warwick Writing Programme will lead a discussion on international women’s literature and the new Warwick Prize for Women in Translation on Wednesday 22 November, 7 - 8.15 p.m., at Warwick Books in Warwick town centre. You may want to read one or more of the six books shortlisted for this year’s prize and come along with your thoughts but you can also simply join us for the discussion – all welcome! Please e-mail translation@warwick.ac.uk to reserve your spot. Supported by the Connecting Cultures GRP, Warwick Books and Harper Collins Independent Thinking.


Translation Slam

Literary translators Sophie Hughes and Rosalind Harvey will be battling it out over commas and word choices at Warwick Books on Tuesday 21 November, 7 - 8.15 p.m., at Warwick Books in Warwick town centre. Mexican writer Laia Jufresa will be in attendance. Please e-mail translation@warwick.ac.uk to reserve your spot. Supported by the Connecting Cultures GRP, Warwick Books and Harper Collins Independent Thinking.


The Warwick Prize for Women in Translation - Shortlist Announced!

The competition received a total of 58 eligible entries of which 16 titles made the initial longlist. The shortlist comprises a novel, a novella, a children’s book, a collection of poetry and a volume of short stories. The source languages represented are Polish and German, with two shortlisted titles apiece, as well as Irish and Russian.

The full list of shortlisted titles is as follows: 

- Second-hand Time by Svetlana Alexievich, translated from Russian by Bela Sheyavich (Fitzcarraldo Editions, 2016)

- Swallow Summer by Larissa Boehning, translated from German by Lyn Marven (Comma Press, 2016)

- Clementine Loves Red by Krystyna Boglar, translated from Polish by Antonia Lloyd-Jones and Zosia Krasodomska-Jones (Pushkin Children’s Books, 2016)

- The Coast Road by Ailbhe Ní Ghearbhuigh, translated from Irish by Michael Coady, Peter Fallon, Tom French, Alan Gillis, Vona Groarke, John McAuliffe, Medbh McGuckian, Paul Muldoon, Michelle O’Sullivan, Justin Quinn, Billy Ramsell, Peter Sirr and David Wheatley (The Gallery Press, 2016)

- Swallowing Mercury by Wioletta Greg, translated from Polish by Eliza Marciniak (Portobello Books, 2017)

- Memoirs of a Polar Bear by Yoko Tawada, translated from German by Susan Bernofsky (Portobello Books, 2016)

Click here for more information on the Prize for Women in Translation and Translation at Warwick.


Tabish Khair - Digitalisation, Politics and Literature: Or Why Literature Matters?

Partly drawing upon Byung-Chul Han’s philosophical texts, this talk will examine why – and how – creative literature matters in an age of ‘post-truth.’ It will try to formulate a definition of literature that is neither parochial nor relativist, neither left to the ‘market’ nor to the ‘reader’, and that does not depend, finally, on unexamined nationalist or globalist assumptions. It will also look at the impact of digitalisation on literature, and connect both to politics.

The event will be held on the 6th October 2017, 17:00 in Oculus building, room 1.04

 

ABOUT THE SPEAKER:

Tabish Khair, PhD, DPhil

Associate Professor, Aarhus University, Denmark

Leverhulme Guest Professor, Leeds University, UK

Educated up to his Masters in Gaya, Bihar, India, and then doing a PhD from Copenhagen, after working as a journalist in Patna and Delhi for a few years, Tabish Khair is the author of various books, including novels and poetry. These include the studies Babu Fictions: Alienation in Contemporary Indian English Novels, and The Gothic, Postcolonialism and Otherness. In 2016, he published a study, The New Xenophobia and a novel, Jihadi Jane, to critical acclaim. Winner of the All India Poetry Prize, his fiction has been shortlisted for the Man Asian Prize, the DSC Prize, the Hindu Fiction Prize, Encore Award, etc. He is currently a Leverhulme guest professor at the School of English, Leeds University, UK.

Tue 03 October 2017, 07:31 | Tags: Conference, Undergraduate, Staff, Research, Public Event, Postgraduate

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