Skip to main content

Dr Simon Jackson

SJ


Leverhulme Early Career Fellow

Email: simon dot j dot jackson at warwick dot ac dot uk

Web: https://warwick.academia.edu/SimonJackson

Room H436
Humanities Building, University Road
University of Warwick
Coventry CV4 7AL


About

Dr Simon Jackson is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in the Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies.


Research interests

My research centres on the relationship between poetry and music in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. My doctoral research examined the literary and musical activities of the poet-priest George Herbert and his extended family; my thesis was awarded the first triennial George Herbert Society Chauncey Wood Dissertation Award (2011-2013). My article on 'The Visual Music of the Masque, and George Herbert's "The Temple",' was recently awarded the award for the best work published in English Literary Renaissance in 2015.

I am currently working on a project titled the Musical Publications of the Seventeenth-Century Lyric, exploring the variety of ways musicians ‘published’ and helped to disseminate lyric poetry in the period through manuscript circulation, printed collections and in practical musical performance. I also work on the early modern poet-composers Thomas Campion and Thomas Whythorne; early modern psalmody; a project to reconstruct the library of the philosopher, poet and composer Edward, first Lord Herbert of Cherbury; and the literary interests of the composer Benjamin Britten.

In addition to my academic work, I also hold the post of Organist and Director of Music at Little St Mary’s, Cambridge, sometime church of the metaphysical poet and priest Richard Crashaw.


Teaching and supervision

EN101: The Epic Tradition

EN228: The Seventeenth Century


Selected publications

His Sweet Art (Choir of LSM, directed by Simon Jackson)


Qualifications

  • BA (Cambridge)
  • MPhil (Cambridge)
  • PhD (Cambridge)

Office hours

Autumn 2014

Mondays, 4-5pm



Teaching

Undergraduate modules

EN101 The Epic Tradition

EN228 Seventeenth Century


Connect

FacebookTwitterLinkedInacademia.eduYouTubeWordpress