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History Club - Week 6

This week, we're back to exploring the various sources held by the Modern Records Centre. Founded in 1973, the MRC launched with the principal objectives of locating and preserving primary sources for modern British social, political and economic history. As we'll see, they have loads of interesting and important things in their collections!

Women Chainmakers

During the 19th century, the Black Country - in particular the Cradley Heath area - became the centre for chain making in Britain. Heavy to medium chains were produced by men in factories, however the smaller chains (often known as 'hand-hammered' or 'country-work' chains) were often hand-worked by women or children in small cramped forges in outbuildings next to the home.

Look at the exhibition at https://warwick.ac.uk/services/library/mrc/archives_online/digital/tradeboard/chainmakers/ and use the following sources to answer the questions: 

 

  1. What was the purpose of the Trades Board Act 1909? 
  2. Describe the working conditions of the chainmakers.
  3. What reasons does Source D give for increasing wages? 
  4. According to Source D what should you be able to afford with a living wage? 
  5. Why does Arthur Powell object to the increase in wages? 
  6. Using Sources A and E as evidence, why do you think the strike was successful?  

 

When you've made your way through the sources and questions, you can submit them to us at historyclub@warwick.ac.uk. Try to respond to all of the questions if you can, but don't worry if you can't - this isn't a test!

General Information:

To help you think about these sources in a historical way, use the list of questions to guide your thinking.

When you've made your way through the sources and questions, you can submit them to us at historyclub@warwick.ac.uk. Try to respond to all of the questions if you can, but don't worry if you can't - this isn't a test!

 

Tips for Using
Primary Sources: