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Juvenile Crime


Key reading

  • Clive Emsley, Crime and Society in England, 1750-1900, chapter 3

Further Reading

  • K. Bradley, A. Logan and S. Shaw, ‘Youth and Crime: Centennial Reflections on the Children’s Act, 1908’, Crimes and Misdemeanours, 3 (2009)
  • Pamela Cox and Heather Shore, Becoming Delinquent
  • A. Davies, '"These viragoes are no less cruel than the lads": young women, gangs and violence in late Victorian Manchester and Salford', British Journal of Criminology, 39 (1999)
  • Jeannie Duckworth, Fagin's Children: Criminal Children in Victorian England
  • J Gillis, 'The evolution of juvenile delinquency', Past and Present, 1975
  • Philip Gooderson, 'Noisy and Dangerous Boys' : The Slogging Gang Phenomenon in Late Nineteenth-Century Birmingham', Midland History, 2013
  • Drew Gray, Crime, Policing and Punishment in England (chapter on juvenile crime)
  • Peter King, ‘The Rise of Juvenile Delinquency in England, 1780-1840’, Past and Present, 160 (1998), pp. 116-166.
  • Seth Koven, 'Borderlands' in Seth Koven and Sonya Michel, Mothers of a New World
  • P. Lerman, ‘Policing Juveniles in London: Shifts in Guiding Discretion, 1893-1968’, British Journal for Criminology, 24 (1984), pp. 168-84
  • Anne Logan, ‘Policy Networks and the Juvenile Court: the Reform of Youth Justice, c. 1905-50’, Crimes and Misdemeanours, 3 (2009)
  • S.Magarey, ‘The Invention of Juvenile Delinquency in Early Nineteenth Century England’, in John Muncie, Gordon Hughes and Eugene McLaughlin (eds), Youth Justice: Critical Readings
  • M. May, ‘Innocence and Experience: The Evolution of the Concept of Juvenile Delinquency in the Mid Nineteenth Century’, in John Muncie, Gordon Hughes and Eugene McLaughlin (eds), Youth Justice: Critical Readings
  • Geoffrey Pearson, Hooligan: A History of Respectable Fears
  • Sarah Pickard, Anti-Social Behaviour in Britain chapter 10
  • Heather Shore, ‘The Trouble with Boys: Gender and the “Invention” of the Juvenile Offender in Early Nineteenth-Century Britain’, in Margaret Arnot and Cornelie Usborne, Gender and Crime in Modern Europe
  • Heather Shore, ‘Cross Coves, Buzzers and General Sorts of Prigs: Crime and the Criminal “Underworld” in the Early Nineteenth Century’, British Journal of Criminology, 39 (1999), 10-24
  • Heather Shore, ‘Reforming the Juvenile: Gender, Justice and the Child Criminal in Nineteenth-Century England’, in John Muncie, Gordon Hughes and Eugene McLaughlin (eds), Youth Justice: Critical Readings

Questions

  • Was the juvenile delinquent an invention of the Victorian era?
  • Why did gangs of youths cause such concern?
  • What were the reasons that contemporary commentators gave for youth crime?
  • What motivated young girls to commit crimes? Were they treated differently than young men?
  • How important was philanthropy or the 'voluntary impulse' in the treatment of juvenile offenders?