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Politics and Literature in Britain from the Russian Revolution to the Cold War (HI2D7): Bibliography


Term 1

Week 1: Introduction and historical background

Suggested reading: Douglas Moggach, 'Aesthetics and Politics', in Gareth Stedman Jones & Gregory Claeys, eds., The Cambridge History of Nineteenth-Century Political Thought (Cambridge, 2011), 479-520; Irving Howe, Politics and the Novel (New York, 1957), esp. ch.1; Carolyn Steedman, Poetry for Historians: Or, W.H. Auden and History (Manchester, 2018); Terry Eagleton, The Ideology of the Aesthetic (Oxford, 1990), Introduction & ch.1; Jürgen Habermas, The Philosophical Discourse of Modernity: Twelve Lectures, trans. F. Lawrence (Cambridge, MA, 1987), ch.I & pp.45-50

 

Week 2: Aesthetics and politics in Britain before 1914 

Key reading: Stephen Yeo, ‘A New Life: The Religion of Socialism in Britain, 1883-1896’, History Workshop Journal 4 (1977), 5-56; Ruth Livesey, Socialism, Sex, and the Culture of Aestheticism in Britain, 1880-1914 (Oxford, 2007), Introduction & chs.1, 6-7

Additional reading: Mark Bevir, The Making of British Socialism (Princeton NJ/ Oxford, 2011), chs. 5, 8, 12; Patrick Brantlinger, ‘“News from Nowhere”: William Morris’s Socialist Anti-Novel’, Victorian Studies 19:1 (1975), 35-49; Kevin Manton, ‘The Fellowship of the New Life: English Ethical Socialism Reconsidered’, History of Political Thought XXIV (2003), 282-304; Ian Britain, Fabianism and Culture: A study in British socialism and the arts, c.1884-1918 (Cambridge, 1982); Gareth Griffin, Socialism and Superior Brains: The Political Thought of Bernard Shaw (London, 1993); Thomas Linehan, Modernism and British Socialism (Basingstoke, 2012); Kay Daniels, ‘Emma Brooke: Fabian, feminist and writer’, Women’s History Review 12:2 (2003), 153-168; George P. Landow, Ruskin (Oxford, 1985); Robert Hewison, Ruskin (Oxford, 2007); Peter Stansky, William Morris (Oxford, 1983); Sheila Rowbotham, Edward Carpenter: A Life of Liberty and Love (London, 2009); Stuart Eagles, After Ruskin: The Social and Political Legacies of a Victorian Prophet (Oxford, 2011), esp. ch.1 & Conclusion


Week 3: The Great War and literary ‘reconstruction’

Key reading: George Robb, British Culture & the First World War (London/ New York, 2002; second edn., 2015), chs.5 & 6; Chris Baldick, Literature of the 1920s: Writers Among the Ruins (Edinburgh, 2012); David Goldie, A Critical Difference: T.S. Eliot and John Middleton Murry in English Literary Criticism, 1919-1928 (Oxford, 1998), ch.1 esp. pp.15-34

Additional reading: Anne Rasmussen, ‘Mobilising Minds’, and Nicolas Beaupré, ‘Soldier-writers and poets’, in Jay Winter, ed., The Cambridge History of the First World War, Volume 3: Civil Society (Cambridge, 2014); Paul Fussell, The Great War and Modern Memory (Oxford, 1975); Samuel Hynes, A War Imagined: The First World War and English Culture (London, 1990); Vincent Sherry, The Great War and the Language of Modernism (Oxford, 2003), or his ‘The Great War and literary modernism in England’, in Sherry, ed., The Cambridge Companion to the Literature of the First World War (Cambridge, 2005), 113-137; Chris Baldick, The Social Mission of English Criticism 1848-1932 (Oxford, 1983), ch.4; Jason Harding, The Criterion: Cultural Politics and Periodical Networks in Inter-War Britain (Oxford, 2002), ch.10; Samuel Hynes, The Auden Generation: Literature and Politics in England in the 1930s (London, 1976), ch.I; Rodney Gerald Beecham, ‘Fiction and memoir of Britain’s Great War: disillusioned or disparate?’, European Review of History 22:5 (2015), 791-813

 

Week 4: The Russian Revolution: ‘Proletcult’ or universal culture?

Key reading: Sheila Fitzpatrick, ‘The Bolsheviks’ Dilemma: Class, Culture and Politics in the Early Soviet Years’, Slavic Review 47:4 (1988), 599-613; Geoff Eley, Forging Democracy: The History of the Left in Europe, 1850-2000 (Oxford, 2002), ch.13 (introductory)

Additional reading: Lynn Malley, Culture of the Future: The Proletkult Movement in Revolutionary Russia (Berkeley/ Los Angeles, 1990), esp. chs.1-2, 7-8; Alan M. Wald, ‘Leon Trotsky’s Contributions to Marxist Cultural Theory and Literary Criticism’, in Wald, Writing from the Left: New Essays on Radical Culture and Politics (London, 1994); Murray Frame et al., eds., Russian Culture in War and Revolution, 1914-1922, Book 1: Popular Culture, the Arts, and Institutions (Bloomington, 2014); Terry Eagleton, Marxism and Literary Criticism (Berkeley/ Los Angeles, 1976); Sheila Fitzpatrick, ‘The “Soft” Line on Culture and Its Enemies: Soviet Cultural Policy, 1922-1927’, Slavic Review 33:2 (1974), 267-287; id., ‘Cultural Revolution in Russia, 1928-1932’, Journal of Contemporary History 9:1 (1974), 33-52; Andy Croft, Red Letter Days: British Fiction in the 1930s (London, 1990), ch.1; Stuart Macintyre, A Proletarian Science: Marxism in Britain, 1900-1933 (Cambridge, 1980), chs.3-4; Jonathan Rée, Proletarian Philosophers: Problems in Socialist Culture in Britain, 1900-1940 (Oxford, 1984), esp. chs.2-4

 

Week 5: Modernism and the ‘battle of the brows’: art and politics in the 1920s

Key reading: Sara Blair, ‘Modernism and the Politics of Culture’ in Michael Levenson (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Modernism (Cambridge, 2006), 157-173; Stefan Collini, Absent Minds: Intellectuals in Britain (Oxford, 2006), ch.5 esp. pp.110-19 (introductory)

Additional reading: Rachel Potter, Modernism and Democracy: Literary Culture 1900-1930 (Oxford, 2006), esp. chs.1-2 & 4; Melba Cuddy-Keane, Virginia Woolf, the Intellectual & the Public Sphere (Cambridge, 2007), esp. Introduction & ch.1; D.L. LeMahieu, A Culture for Democracy: Mass Communication and the Cultivated Mind in Britain Between the Wars (Oxford, 1988), ch.3; John Carey, The Intellectuals and the Masses: Pride and Prejudice Among the Literary Intelligentsia, 1880-1939 (London, 1992); Ann Ardis, Modernism and Cultural Conflict, 1880-1922 (Cambridge, 2002); id., ‘Democracy and Modernism: The New Age under A.R. Orage (1907-22)’, in Peter Brooker and Andrew Thacker, eds., The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Modernist Magazines, Volume I: Britain and Ireland 1880-1955 (Oxford, 2009), 205-225, or ‘The Dialogics of Modernism in the New Age’, Modernism/ modernity 14:3 (2007), 407-434; Erica Brown & Mary Grover (eds.), Middlebrow Literary Cultures: The Battle of the Brows, 1920-1960 (Basingstoke, 2012), Introduction & chs.4-5; Jason Harding, The Criterion: Cultural Politics and Periodical Networks in Inter-War Britain (Oxford, 2002), esp. ch.9; Christopher Hilliard, ‘Modernism and the Common Writer’, Historical Journal 48:3 (2005), 769-787; Charles Ferrall & Dougal McNeill, Writing the 1926 General Strike: Literature, Culture, Politics (Cambridge, 2015), Introduction & chs.2-3, Conclusion; John X. Cooper, Modernism and the Culture of Market Society (Cambridge, 2004), esp. Introduction

 

Week 7: Mass culture and its critics in inter-war Britain

Key reading: John Baxendale, ‘Popular Fiction and the Critique of Mass Culture’, in Patrick Parrinder & Andrzej Gasiorek (eds.), The Oxford History of the Novel in English, Volume IV: The Reinvention of the British and Irish Novel, 1880-1940 (Oxford, 2011); Stefan Collini, ‘Where Did It All Go Wrong? Cultural Critics and “Modernity” in Inter-War Britain’, in E.H.H. Green & Duncan Tanner (eds.), The Strange Survival of Liberal England: Political Leaders, Moral Values and the Reception of Economic Debate (Cambridge, 2007), 247-74

Additional reading: Asa Briggs, ‘The Language of Mass and Masses’ in D.E. Martin and D. Rubinstein (eds.), Ideology and the Labour Movement: Essays presented to John Saville (London: Croom Helm, 1979), also reprinted in Briggs, Collected Essays Vol. 1 (Brighton: Harvester Press, 1985); Christopher Hilliard, English as a Vocation: The Scrutiny Movement (Oxford, 2012), ch.2; Chris Baldick, The Social Mission of English Criticism, 1848-1932 (Oxford, 1983), ch.6-8; Gary Day, Re-reading Leavis: ‘Culture’ and Literary Criticism (Basingstoke, 1996), chs.1-3; Stefan Collini, ‘The Literary Critic and the Village Labourer: “Culture” in Twentieth-Century Britain’, Transactions of the Royal Historical Society 14 (2004), 93-116; Fred Inglis, Radical Earnestness: English Social Theory 1880-1980 (Oxford, 1982), ch.5; Chris Waters, ‘Beyond “Americanization”: Rethinking Anglo-American Cultural Exchange between the Wars’, Cultural and Social History 4:4 (2007), 451-9; Genevieve Abravanel, ‘English by Example: F.R. Leavis and the Americanization of Modern England’, Modernism/ modernity 15:4 (2008), 685-701; Chris Waters, British Socialists and the Politics of Popular Culture, 1884-1914 (Manchester, 1990), ch.6 & conclusion


Week 8: Literature and politics in the 1930s 

Key reading: Rod Mengham, ‘The Thirties: Politics, Authority, Perspective’, and David Ayers, ‘Literary Criticism and Cultural Politics’, in The Cambridge History of Twentieth-Century English Literature (Cambridge, 2005), pp. 359-378 & 379-395; Peter Marks, ‘Art and Politics in the 1930s: The European Quarterly (1934-5), Left Review (1934-8) and Poetry and the People (1938-40)’ in Peter Brooker & Andrew Thacker (eds.), The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Modernist Magazines, Volume I: Britain and Ireland 1880-1955 (Oxford, 2009)

Additional reading: Samuel Hynes, The Auden Generation: Literature and Politics in England in the 1930s (London, 1976), chs.II-V; Benjamin Kohlmann, ed., Edward Upward and Left-Wing Literary Culture in Britain (Farnham/ Burlington, VT, 2014), chs.2-3; Valentine Cunningham, British Writers of the Thirties (Oxford, 1988), chs.2-3, 7; Benjamin Kohlmann, Committed Styles: Modernism, Politics, and Left-Wing Literature in the 1930s (Oxford, 2014), Introduction & ch.1; Jason Harding, The Criterion: Cultural Politics and Periodical Networks in Inter-War Britain (Oxford, 2002), chs.8-9; Tyrus Miller, Late Modernism: Politics, Fiction and the Arts Between the World Wars (Berkeley/ Los Angeles, 1999), ch.1; Andy Croft, Red Letter Days: British Fiction in the 1930s (London, 1990); A. Caesar, Dividing lines: poetry, class and ideology in the 1930s (Manchester/ New York: Manchester University Press, 1991), esp. Introduction & chs.1-3; Geoff Andrews, Nina Fishman & Kevin Morgan, eds., Opening the Books: Essays on the Social and Cultural History of British Communism (London, 1995), chs.5 & 8; K. Williams and S. Matthews (eds.), Rewriting the Thirties: Modernism and After (London/ New York: Longman, 1997), chs.2-6; Bernard Bergonzi, Reading the Thirties: Texts and Contexts (London, 1978)


Week 9: Proletarian literature in Britain during the 1930s 

Key reading: Christopher Hilliard, To Exercise our Talents: The Democratization of Writing in Britain (Cambridge, MA/ London, 2006), chs.4-5; Roger Webster, ‘Love on the Dole and the Aesthetic of Contradiction’ in Jeremy Hawthorn (ed.), The British Working-Class Novel in the Twentieth Century (London, 1984), 48-61

Additional reading: Valentine Cunningham, British Writers of the Thirties (Oxford, 1988), pp.305-322; John Fordham, ‘Working-class fiction across the century’ in Robert L. Caserio (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the Twentieth-Century English Novel (Cambridge, 2009), 131-145; Christopher Hilliard, ‘Modernism and the Common Writer’, Historical Journal 48:3 (2005), 769-787; Stephen Constantine, ‘Love on the Dole and its Reception in the 1930s’, Literature and History 8:2 (1992); Chris Hopkins, English Fiction in the 1930s (London, 2006), Part 2 esp. ch.3; Roy Johnson, ‘The Proletarian Novel’, Literature and History 2 (1975); Carole Snee, ‘Working-Class Literature or Proletarian Writing?’ in John Clark, Margot Heinemann, David Margolies & Carole Snee (eds.), Culture and Crisis in Britain in the Thirties (London, 1979); H. Gustav Klaus (ed.), The Socialist Novel in Britain: Towards the Recovery of a Tradition (Brighton, 1982), chs.6 & 7; Ian Haywood, Working-Class Fiction: From Chartism to Trainspotting (1996), ch.2; Nick Hubble, The Proletarian Answer to the Modernist Question (Edinburgh, 2012), Introduction; id., ‘The Making of the Working Class: Proletarian Writing in the 1930s’, in Benjamin Kohlmann & Matthew Taunton (eds.), A History of 1930s British Literature (Cambridge, 2018 – forthcoming); Regenia Gagnier, Subjectivities: A history of self-representation in Britain, 1832-1920 (New York/ Oxford, 1991), ch.4


Week 10: Socialist realism and the Popular Front 

Key reading: Peter Marks, ‘Illusion and Reality: The Spectre of Socialist Realism in Thirties Literature’, in Keith Williams & Steven Matthews (eds.), Rewriting the Thirties: Modernism and After (London/ New York, 1997), 23-36; Ben Harker, ‘“Communism is English”: Edgell Rickword, Jack Lindsay and the Cultural Politics of the Popular Front’, Literature & History 20:2 (2011), 16-34;

Additional reading: David Margolies, ‘Left Review and Left Literary Theory’, in J. Clark et al. (eds.), Culture and Crisis in Britain in the Thirties (London, 1979), 67-81; id., ‘Literature and Democracy: “Left Review”’, Critical Survey 10:3 (1998), 73-82; Philip Bounds, British Communism and the Politics of Literature, 1928-1939 (Pontypool, 2012), chs.2 (on Soviet socialist realism) and 3-5 (British versions); Hannah Behrend, ‘An Intellectual Irrelevance? Marxist Literary Criticism in the 1930s’, in Andy Croft (ed.), A Weapon in the Struggle: The Cultural History of the Communist Party of Great Britain (London, 1998); Samuel Hynes, The Auden Generation: Literature and Politics in England in the 1930s (London, 1976), chs.VI-VIII; Stuart Samuels, ‘The Left Book Club’, Journal of Contemporary History 1:2 (1966), 65-86; John Coombes, Writing from the Left: Socialism, Liberalism and the Popular Front (New York/ London, 1989); Francis Mulhern, ‘The Marxist Aesthetics of Christopher Caudwell’, New Left Review I/85 (1974), 37-58; Elinor Taylor, The Popular Front Novel in Britain, 1934-40 (Leiden/ Boston, 2018)

 

Term 2


Week 11: Literature and the Spanish Civil War 

Key reading: Tom Buchanan, Britain and the Spanish Civil War (Cambridge, 1997), ch.6; Valentine Cunningham, British Writers of the Thirties (Oxford, 1988), ch.13 or his ‘The Spanish Civil War’ in Kate McLoughlin (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to War Writing (Cambridge, 2009), 185-196

Additional reading: J. Wilkinson, ‘Truth and delusion: European Intellectuals in Search of the Spanish Civil War’, Salmagundi 76-7 (1987-88), 3-52; Katherine Bail Hoskins, Today the Struggle: Literature and Politics in England during the Spanish Civil War (Austin TX, 1969); Tom Buchanan, ‘Three Lives of Homage to Catalonia’, The Library 3:3 (2002), 302-14; Stephen Ingle, The Social and Political Thought of George Orwell: A reassessment (Abingdon, 2006), ch.4; Robert Colls, George Orwell: English Rebel (Oxford, 2013), ch.3; Patricia Rae, ‘Orwell, World War I modernism and the Spanish Civil War’, Journal of War and Culture Studies 2:3 (2009); Robert Stradling, History and Legend: Writing the International Brigades (Cardiff, 2003), Introduction, Part I, & ch.8; James K. Hopkins, Into the Heart of the Fire: The British in the Spanish Civil War (Stanford CA, 1998); Anindya Raychaudhuri, ‘“A Courage Steadfast, Luminous”: Christopher Caudwell and the Communist Hero’, in B. Korte and S. Lethbridge, eds., Heroes and Heroism in British Fiction Since 1800 (Palgrave, 2016), 101-16; Ian Patterson, ‘The Penny’s Mighty Sacrifice: The Spanish Civil War and Left Poetics’, in Alex Houen & Jan-Melissa Schramm (eds.), Sacrifice and Modern War Literature: The Battle of Waterloo to the War on Terror (Oxford, 2018); Peter Monteath, Writing the Good Fight: Political Commitment in the International Literature of the Spanish Civil War (Westport CT/ London, 1994)

 

Week 12: ‘The long 1939’: literature and politics at the end of ‘the Thirties’ 

Key reading: Steve Ellis, British Writers and the Approach of World War II (Cambridge, 2015), Introduction & ch.4; Samuel Hynes, The Auden Generation: Literature and Politics in England in the 1930s (London, 1976), chs.X-XI

Additional reading: Sebastian Knowles, A Purgatorial Flame: Seven British Writers in the Second World War (Philadelphia, 1990), Preface & chs.I-III; Phyllis Lassner, British Women Writers of World War II: Battlegrounds of Their Own (Basingstoke, 1998), Introduction & chs.1-2; Sean Pryor, ‘Poetry and Decision: F.T. Prince in September 1938’, Review of English Studies 63 (2012), 818-40; Malcolm Smith, ‘George Orwell, War and Politics in the 1930s’, Literature and History 6:2 (1980), 219-234; Robert Colls, George Orwell: English Rebel (Oxford, 2013), ch.4; Peter MacDonald, ‘Believing in the Thirties’, in Keith Williams & Steven Matthews (eds.), Rewriting the Thirties: Modernism and After (Longman, 1997), 71-90; John Baxendale and Christopher Pawling (eds.), Narrating the Thirties: A decade in the making, 1930 to the present (Basingstoke, 1996); Leo Mellor & Glyn Salton-Cox, ‘Introduction’, Critical Quarterly 57:3 (2015), 1-9 (introduction to special issue on ‘The Long 1930s’)

 

Week 13: Literature and national culture in the Second World War

Key reading: Robert Hewison, Culture and Consensus: England, Art and Politics since 1940 (London, 1995), ch.II; Sonya Rose, Which People’s War? National Identity and Citizenship in Britain 1939-1945 (Oxford, 2003), Introduction (pp.1-28); Christopher Hilliard, To Exercise Our Talents: The Democratization of Writing in Britain (Cambridge, MA/ London, 2006), chs.6-7

Additional reading: Sean Latham, ‘Cyril Connolly’s Horizon and the End of Modernism’ in Peter Brooker & Andrew Thacker, eds., The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Modernist Magazines, Volume I: Britain and Ireland 1880-1955 (Oxford, 2009); Peter Marks, George Orwell the Essayist: Literature, Politics and the Periodical Culture (London, 2011), ch.3; John Baxendale, Priestley’s England: J.B. Priestley and English Culture (Manchester/ New York, 2007), ch.5; Kristine A. Miller, British Literature of the Blitz: Fighting the People’s War (Basingstoke, 2009); Mark Rawlinson, British Writing of the Second World War (Oxford, 2000), ch.5; Marina MacKay, Modernism and World War II (Cambridge, 2007); Caroline Levine, ‘Propaganda for Democracy: The Curious Case of Love on the Dole’, Journal of British Studies 45:4 (2006), 846-874; Geoffrey Field, Blood, Sweat and Toil: Remaking the British Working Class, 1939-1945 (Oxford, 2011), esp. Introduction, ch.6, Conclusion; F.M. Leventhal, ‘“The Best for the Most”: CEMA and State Sponsorship of the Arts in Wartime, 1939-1945’, Twentieth Century British History 1:3 (1990), 289-317; Richard Weight, ‘State, Intelligentsia and the Promotion of National Culture in Britain, 1939-1945’, Historical Research 69 (1996), 83-101; Janet Minihan, The Nationalization of Culture: The Development of State Subsidies to the Arts in Great Britain (New York 1977), ch.7


Week 14: Literature, politics and the state from the Second World War to the Cold War 

Key reading: Ben Harker, ‘Politics and Letters: The “Soviet Literary Controversy” in Britain’, Literature & History 24:1 (2015), 41-56; H. Wilford, The CIA, the British Left and the Cultural Cold War: Calling the Tune? (London, 2003), Introduction & ch.6

Additional reading: Benjamin Kohlmann & Matthew Taunton, ‘Literatures of Anti-Communism’, Literature & History 24:1 (2015), 5-10 and essays in same issue by Marina MacKay (27-40) & Nick Hubble (57-72); Andy Croft, ‘Writers, the Communist Party and the Battle of Ideas, 1945-50’, Socialist History 5 (1994), 2-25; Robert Hewison, In Anger: British Culture in the Cold War, 1945-60 (New York, 1981); Stefan Collini, Absent Minds: Intellectuals in Britain (Oxford, 2006), ch.17; J.R. Fyrth (ed.), Labour’s Promised Land? Culture and Society in Labour Britain, 1945-51 (London, 1955) – esp. essays by Andy Croft, ‘Betrayed Spring: The Labour Government and British Literary Culture’, 217-50; and S. Parsons, ‘British McCarthyism and the Intellectuals’; Marina MacKay, ‘“Doing Business with Totalitaria”: British Late Modernism and the Politics of Reputation’, ELH 73:2 (2006), 729-753; Giles Scott-Smith, The Politics of Apolitical Culture: The Congress for Cultural Freedom, the CIA, and Post-War American Hegemony (New York, 2002), Introduction & ch.4; Tony Shaw, ‘The British Popular Press and the Early Cold War’, History 83 (1998), 66-85

 

Week 15: Liberalism and the Cold War (I): Orwell

Key reading: David Dwan, ‘Truth and Freedom in Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four’, Philosophy and Literature 34:2 (2010), 381-393, and id., ‘Orwell’s Paradox: Equality in Animal Farm’, ELH 79:3 (2012), 655-683; Stephen Ingle, The Social and Political Thought of George Orwell: A Reassessment (Abingdon, 2006), ch.6

Additional reading: John Rodden, The Politics of Literary Reputation: The Making and Claiming of “St George” Orwell (New York/ Oxford, 1989); David Dwan, Liberty, Equality and Humbug: Orwell’s Political Ideals (forthcoming, Oxford, 2018); John Newsinger, Orwell’s Politics (Basingstoke, 1999); Peter Marks, George Orwell the Essayist: Literature, Politics and the Periodical Culture (London, 2011), ch.4; Philip Bounds, Orwell & Marxism: The Political and Cultural Thinking of George Orwell (London/ New York, 2009), chs.3 & 5; Alex Woloch, Or Orwell: Writing and Democratic Socialism (Cambridge MA/ London, 2016), Part 2; Carl Freedman, ‘The Antinomies of “Nineteen Eighty-Four”’, Modern Fiction Studies 30:4 (1984), 601-20; Peter Stansky, ed., On Nineteen Eighty-Four (New York, 1983); R.K. Sanderson, ‘The Two Narrators and Happy Ending of Nineteen Eighty-Four’, Modern Fiction Studies 34 (1988), 587-595; Alok Rai, Orwell and the Politics of Despair: A critical study of the writings of George Orwell (Cambridge, 1988)

 

Week 17: Communist Literature after the Soviet Literary Controversy

Key reading: Sheila Fitzpatrick, ‘Cultural Orthodoxies Under Stalin’, in Fitzpatrick, The Cultural Front: Power and Culture in Revolutionary Russia (Ithaca & London, 1992), 238-256; Andrzej Gasiorek, Post-War British Fiction: Realism and After (London, 1995), ch.4

Additional reading: David Caute, Politics and the Novel During the Cold War (New Brunswick/ London, 2010), ch.17; Andy Croft, ‘The End of Socialist Realism’, in M. Joannou & D. Margolies (eds.), Heart of a Heathen World: Essays on Culture and Commitment in Memory of Margot Heinemann (London, 1995), 196-214; id., ‘The Boys Round the Corner: The Story of Fore Publications’ in Croft ed., A Weapon in the Struggle: The History of the Communist Party of Great Britain (London, 1998), or ‘Authors Take Sides: Writers and the Communist Party 1920-56’, in Geoff Andrews, Nina Fishman & Kevin Morgan, eds., Opening the Books: Essays on the Social and Cultural History of British Communism (London, 1995); Gordon Johnston, ‘Writing and Publishing the Cold War: John Berger and Secker & Warburg’, Twentieth Century British History 12:4 (2001), 432-460; Sandra Singer, ‘Feminist Commitment to Left-Wing Realism in The Golden Notebook’, in Alice Ridout et al. (eds.), Doris Lessing’s The Golden Notebook After Fifty (New York, 2015), 73-95; Dipek Nandy, ‘Arnold Kettle and English Marxist Literary Criticism’, in Graham Martin & W.R. Owens (eds.), Arnold Kettle, Literature and Liberation: Selected Essays (Manchester, 1988), 1-20; John T. Connnor, ‘Jack Lindsay, Socialist Humanism and the Communist Historical Novel’, Review of English Studies n.s. 66:274 (2014), 342-363; Benjamin Kohlmann, ‘Toward a History and Theory of the Socialist Bildungsroman’, Novel 48:2 (2015), 167-189


Week 18: Liberalism and the Cold War (II): Encounter magazine 

Key reading: Jason Harding, ‘“Our Greatest Asset”: Encounter Magazine and the Congress for Cultural Freedom’, in G.G. Scott-Smith & C.A. Leg (eds.), Campaigning Culture and the Global Cold War: The Journals of the Congress for Cultural Freedom (London, 2017), 107-125; Greg Barnhisel, Cold War Modernists: Art, Literature, and American Cultural Diplomacy (New York, 2015), ch.4

Additional reading: H. Wilford, The CIA, the British Left and the Cultural Cold War: Calling the Tune? (London, 2003), ch.8; Giles Scott-Smith, The Politics of Apolitical Culture: The Congress for Cultural Freedom, the CIA and post-war American hegemony (London, 2002), Introduction, chs.5 (esp. pp.125-32) & ch.6, or id., ‘The Congress for Cultural Freedom, The End of Ideology and the 1955 Milan Conference: “Defining the Parameters of Discourse”’, Journal of Contemporary History 37:3 (2002), 437-455; Peter Coleman, The Liberal Conspiracy: The Congress for Cultural Freedom and the Struggle for the Mind of Postwar Europe (New York/ London, 1989), ch.4; Frances Stonor Saunders, Who Paid the Piper? The CIA and the Cultural Cold War (London, 1999), ch.12; David Caute, The Dancer Defects: The Struggle for Cultural Supremacy during the Cold War (Oxford, 2005); Tony Shaw, ‘The Politics of Cold War Culture’, Journal of Cold War Studies 3:3 (2001), 59-76; Gordon Johnston, ‘Revisiting the cultural Cold War’, Social History 35:3 (2010), 290-307

  

Week 19: Realism and the novel in the 1950s

Key reading: Alice Ferrebe, Literature of the 1950s: Good, Brave Causes (Edinburgh, 2012), chs.1, 3-4; Blake Morrison, The Movement: English Poetry and Fiction of the 1950s (Oxford, 1980), Introduction & chs.2 & 4

Additional reading: Tracy Hargreaves & Alice Ferrebe, ‘Introduction: Literature of the 1950s and 1960s’, Yearbook of English Studies 42 (2012), 1-12 (introductory); Andrzej Gasiorek, Post-war British Fiction: Realism and After (London, 1995), ch.1; Nick Bentley, Radical Fictions: The English Novel in the 1950s (Bern, 2007); Stefan Collini, Absent Minds: Intellectuals in Britain (Oxford, 2006), ch.7; Greg Londe, ‘Reconsidering Lucky Jim: Kingsley Amis and the Condition of England’, and Bernard Bergonzi, ‘The British Novel in 1960’, in Marina MacKay & Lyndsey Stonebridge, eds., British Fiction After Modernism: The Novel at Mid-Century (Basingstoke, 2007), pp.131-144 & 203-211; Zachary Leader (ed.), The Movement Reconsidered: Essays on Larkin, Amis, Gunn, Davie and Their Contemporaries (Oxford, 2009); Rod Mengham, ‘Bad Teeth: British Social Realism in Fiction’ in David Tucker (ed.), British Social Realism in the Arts since 1940 (Basingstoke, 2012), 81-102; Roberto del Valle Alcalá, ‘Sketches of Autonomy: Capitalist Subsumption and Working-Class Resistance in Alan Sillitoe’s Early Fiction’, Genre 48:3 (2015), 435-459; Ingrid von Rosenberg, ‘Militancy, Anger and Resignation: Alternative Moods in the Working-Class Novel of the 1950s and early 1960s’, in H. Gustav Klaus (ed.), The Socialist Novel in Britain (Brighton, 1982), 145-65; Nicola Wilson, ‘Working-Class Fictions’ in Peter Boxall & Bryan Cheyette (eds.), The Oxford History of the Novel in English, Volume 7: British and Irish Fiction since 1940 (Oxford, 2016), 64-79; Stuart Laing, Representations of Working-Class Life, 1957-64 (London, 1986); Stephen Lacey, British Realist Theatre: The New Wave in its Context, 1956-1965 (London, 1995); Dan Rebellato, 1956 And All That: The Making of Modern British Drama (London, 1999), ch.1

 

Week 20: The New Left and the politics of culture after Stalinism 

Key reading: Michael Kenny, The First New Left (London, 1995), chs.2 & 4; Ken Hirschkop, ‘Culture, class and education’ in The Cambridge History of Twentieth-Century English Literature (Cambridge, 2005), 455-473

Additional reading: Alexander Hutton, ‘Literature, Criticism, and Politics in the Early New Left, 1956-62’, Twentieth Century British History 27:1 (2016), 51-75; Nick Bentley, Radical Fictions: The English Novel in the 1950s (Bern, 2007), ch.3; Stuart Middleton, ‘E.P. Thompson and the cultural politics of literary modernism’, Contemporary British History 28:4 (2014), 422-437; id., ‘The concept of “experience” and the making of the English working class, 1924-1963’, Modern Intellectual History 13:1 (2016), 179-208; Lesley Hardy, ‘F.R. Leavis, E.P. Thompson and the New Left: Some Shared Critical Responses’, Socialist History 30 (2007), 1-21; Christopher Hilliard, English as a Vocation: The Scrutiny Movement (Oxford, 2012), ch.5; Sue Owen, ‘The Abuse of Literacy and the Feeling Heart: The Trials of Richard Hoggart’, Cambridge Quarterly 34:2 (2005), 147-176; Stefan Collini, ‘Richard Hoggart: Literary Criticism and Cultural Decline in Twentieth-Century Britain’, in Sue Owen, ed., Richard Hoggart and Cultural Studies (Basingstoke, 2008); Lin Chun, The British New Left: A Critical History (Edinburgh, 1993), ch.2; Dennis Dworkin, Cultural Marxism in Postwar Britain: History, the New Left and the Origins of Cultural Studies (Durham, NC/ London, 1997) chs.1-3; John Goode, ‘E.P. Thomson and “the Significance of Literature”’, in Harvey J. Kaye & Keith McLelland, eds., E.P. Thompson: Critical Perspectives (Philadelphia, 1990), 183-203

 

Term 3

 

Week 21: Themes

Suggested reading: D.L. LeMahieu, A Culture for Democracy: Mass Communication and the Cultivated Mind in Britain Between the Wars (Oxford, 1988); Ross McKibbin, Classes and Cultures: England 1918-1951 (Oxford, 1998), Conclusion; Robert Hewison, Culture and Consensus: England, Art and Politics since 1940 (London, 1995); Alan Sinfield, Literature, Politics and Culture in Postwar Britain (London, 1989); Francis Mulhern, Culture/ Metaculture (London/ New York, 2000); John Coombes, Writing from the Left: Socialism, Liberalism and the Popular Front (New York/ London, 1989); Chris Waters, British Socialists and the Politics of Popular Culture, 1884-1914 (Manchester, 1990); Daniel Bell, ‘Modernism Mummified’, American Quarterly 39:1 (1987), 122-132; Greg Barnhisel, Cold War Modernists: Art, Literature, and American Cultural Diplomacy (New York, 2015), Introduction & ch.1, Conclusion; Benjamin Kohlmann, Committed Styles: Modernism, Politics, and Left-Wing Literature in the 1930s (Oxford, 2014), Introduction & pp.197-200; Michael Denning, The Cultural Front: The Laboring of American Culture in the Twentieth Century (London/ New York, 1997)