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Composite calendar

This is a composite calendar page template pulling in feeds from events calendars in department and research centre sites. It is purely used as a tool to collect the event details before filtering through to a publicly-visible calendar filter page template. To remove or add a feed to this composite calendar, please contact the IT Services Web Team (webteam at warwick dot ac dot uk).

Thursday, May 09, 2019

 
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Light in Darkness: The mystical philosophy of Jacob Böhme
Chapel of Christ the Servan, Coventry Cathedral

Runs from Tuesday, April 30 to Friday, July 05.

Light in Darkness: The mystical philosophy of Jacob Böhme

Free special guided tours of the exhibition.

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Renaissance Support Librarian-Office Hour
H4.50
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GSD - UGSC
R3.38, Ramphal Building
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Humanities Book Launch
Graduate Space, Humanities

Further details will be announced in the Spring Term

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Lost Before It Was Found: The 'LBT' Moment in Indian LGBT activism
R1.03 Ramphal Building

Speaker: Poorva Rajaram. The speaker is a writer and a co-organiser of the Bangalore Queer Film Festival. She is also a PhD research scholar at the Centre for Historical Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. She used to work as a journalist and co-founded The Ladies Finger, an online women's zine.

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History of Art Alumni Careers Event.

Past students from the Department will be returning to speak to History of Art undergraduates about their current careers and their career path. The attendance form is available on the student intranet pages.

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"Of Winged Words and Homeland Security" - Dr Sasha-Mae Eccleston
MS.04

Dr Sasha-Mae Eccleston

IAS International visiting fellowship - Public Lecture followed by a drinks reception

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Classical Connections - IAS VF Public Lecture: Dr Sasha-Mae Eccleston (Brown) "Of Winged Words and Homeland Security"
MS.04

Dr Sasha-Mae Eccleston is Assistant Professor of Classics at Brown University. Her research examines the interstices between moral philosophy, ecocriticism, and literature from the Roman Empire; Classical reception (throughout the African Diaspora); and critical race theory, Classics, and educational reform. This lecture is part of her ongoing project Epic Events, which explains how authors of works produced after 9/11, especially those from newly racialized groups in the U.S., use the Greco-Roman canon to negotiate the state’s efforts to define the terrorist attacks of 2001 as an epoch making event. Of interest to Americanists, scholars interested in museum studies, literature, popular culture, and ecocriticism.

The lecture is generously funded by the IAS.