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Composite calendar

This is a composite calendar page template pulling in feeds from events calendars in department and research centre sites. It is purely used as a tool to collect the event details before filtering through to a publicly-visible calendar filter page template. To remove or add a feed to this composite calendar, please contact the IT Services Web Team (webteam at warwick dot ac dot uk).

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

 
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Warwick Marrow appeal
Piazza and Students Union

Warwick Marrow are running an event on Tuesday 29th October from 10-5pm. We will be located on the Piazza and in the SU.

Warwick Marrow are a student led-branch of the national charity Anthony Nolan, we run events on campus in order to sign up people to the stem cell register to find matches that can potentially lead to a second chance of life for many patients with blood cancers and disorders.

One year ago we ran an event for a young boy named Marley, while tens of thousands of people have signed up to the stem cell register at events held under his name, he still doesnt have a match. Our event on Tuesday will be held in order to help people like Marley to get a second chance of life and find that lifesaving match.

The more people on the register means more potential lives saved and it only takes 5 minutes so please come and see us!

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WiP: Dr Kathryn Woods (Warwick) ‘Exclusion and the Voluntary Hospital in Eighteenth-Century London’
Seminar room 2, Wolfson Research Exchange, 3rd floor, the Library, University of Warwick

Lunch will be provided. Please let the CHM Coordinator know if you will be attending.

I will be presenting an overview of a chapter I am writing entitled 'Exclusion and the Voluntary Hospital in Eighteenth-Century London'. This chapter is to be included in an edited collection that I am editing with Dr Naomi Pullin, Negotiating Exclusion in the Early Modern England, 1550-1750 (Routledge, forthcoming 2020). The chapter focusses on the Westminster Infirmary: the world's first voluntary hospital. It explores how the activities of the hospital - from its foundation and institutional governance and administration, to staffing, practices of admittance and discharge, and daily ward activity – were shaped by eighteenth-century conceptions of who constituted societal ‘insiders’ and ‘outsiders’, and societal conditions of ‘normalcy’ and ‘abnormalcy’. It also considers how these categories were negotiated within and defined by the Westminster Infirmary.



To provide some context and give an indication of how exclusion is conceptualised and used as a category of analysis in this volume, I have attached a draft of the introduction that I have been writing with Naomi. I would welcome any comments on this. I also welcome the opportunity to field your ideas on my plan for the chapter in the session.


Negotiating Exclusions Draft Intro for WiP

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seminar: Dr Rachel Bennett (Warwick) 'A Heritage of Woe? Debating Prison Births in Twentieth-Century England'
R0.14 Ramphal building, University of Warwick
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seminar: Dr Rachel Bennett (Warwick): 'A Heritage of Woe? Debating Prison Births in Twentieth-Century England'
R0.14 Ramphal building, University of Warwick

In 1903 Arthur Griffiths, a prison administrator, stated that to be born in prison was an ‘inalienable heritage of woe.’ However, he captured the long-standing inconsistency surrounding this issue when he added that, despite the stigma, in many cases ‘the prison born are better off than the free born – they are more cared for, more delicately nurtured.’ The question of prison births perennially troubled prison authorities throughout the first half of the twentieth century. There were those who acknowledged the potential remedial effects for mothers and other women of having children in the prison and the opportunities a prison sentence offered for medical and social intervention. However, others lamented the risk of moral contagion and worried that to be born in prison carried with it a life-long stigma for children – deemed to be innocent in the eyes of the law.

Holloway Prison image

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Annual Walter Rodney lecture
Room OC0.04

"Living with a Legacy: My Journey with Walter Rodney".

by Dr Patricia Rodney

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Walter Rodney Lecture
Oculus, Room OC0.04

Yesu Persaud Centre for Caribbean Studies

 Living with a Legacy: My Journey with Walter Rodney

 This year’s Walter Rodney lecture will be given by Dr Patricia Rodney, CEO of the Walter Rodney Foundation (WRF), established by the Rodney family. As a seasoned public health professional, Dr Rodney’s career spans the disciplines of health, adult education and literacy, social work and women, gender and development.

 All welcome. Refreshments provided. .

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Walter Rodney Memorial Lecture by Dr Patricia Rodney, ‘Living with a Legacy: My Journey with Walter Rodney’
OC0.04, Oculus Building
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Research Centre for Post-Kantian European Philosophy Seminar: ‘Kant and Hegel on the Antinomies of Reason’
S0.11 Social Sciences Building

Research Centre for Post-Kantian European Philosophy Seminar:‘Kant and Hegel on the Antinomies of Reason’ taking place on Tuesday 29 October, commencing at 5.30p.m. in S0.11.