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Theatre & Performance Studies News

Nicolas WhybrowNicolas WhybrowTOP STORY: Professor Nicolas Whybrow is Retiring

Professor Nicolas Whybrow is retiring early at the end of October 2020 owing to recent ill health. He is a long-time member of Theatre and Performance Studies at Warwick, joining in February 2004. A former Head of School (2014-2017), Nicolas taught across a range of modules, most notably Performance and the Contemporary City and Live Art and Performance. In 2010 he won the Warwick Award for Teaching Excellence.

Nicolas played a leading role in the University’s research culture, being appointed as thematic lead for two of its GRPs, Sustainable Cities and Connecting Cultures. In 2017-2020 he was the PI on a 3-year AHRC-funded practice-as-research project entitled Sensing the City, which culminated in a multi-medial exhibition at the Herbert Art Gallery, Coventry and an edited book, Urban Sensographies (2021). Meanwhile, his book Contemporary Art Biennials in Europe: the Work of Art in the Complex City appeared in 2020.


Further details about Nicolas are available on his staff profile on the Theatre and Performance Studies website. Happily, he retains his connection to the University as Emeritus Professor.

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Julia Peetz to edit issue of Performance Research 'On Protest'

Julia Peetz is editing an issue of Performance Research 'On Protest' with former Head of Department, Prof. Andy Lavender. Their call for papers is out and can be found below:

Storming the Capitol. Dismantling Confederate and slave trader statues. Refusing to wear a mask. Booing Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko. Sabotaging 5G towers. Buying stamps in an attempt to prop up the United States Postal Service. Defying lèse-majesté laws to criticize Thai royalty. Writing ‘Black Lives Matter’ on roads, so large that the message can be read from Earth orbit. All these actions have been performed as protests in 2020 and 2021, marking this as a year of significant dissent. In the United States alone, the Black Lives Matter actions may be the largest protest movement in the country’s history, eclipsing even the protests of the civil rights era. The US presidential election, meanwhile, was a site for trenchant protests that dramatize the situation of commitment-amid-division that protest typically represents—and that beg wider questions of protest as a contemporary mode of political insistence.

While many of the recent protests around the world mark a resurgence of the popular voice, the language of resistance and opposition has become ubiquitous on the political right as well as for progressives. Right-wing populists paint themselves as perennial outsiders, embattled by and protesting against deep state powers and global cabals. Protestors have weaponized ideals of personal freedom to rage

against COVID-19-specific health guidance regarding the wearing of face coverings in public. Social media are increasingly sites of and means of coordinating protest actions; even so, social media posts framed as protest actions are frequently denounced as merely ‘performative’ forms of protest and allyship. Debates on the correct and most effective manner of performing protest abound, and once-controversial civil rights heroes are invoked as exemplars of ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ ways to protest. Protest has mainstreamed, and it has become more volatile. It belongs not to any single faction or persuasion but has become pervasive—even while it is fostered as part of the repertoire of political sway, a system-theatre of power.

This issue calls for critical examinations of contemporary performances of protest across the globe. It is interested in ways that protest can be understood as theatre, but more particularly—in a multimodal, interconnected environment—as a form of public manifestation that draws upon a wide repertoire of representational devices. It seeks to address the relationship between embodied action, affective presence, communication and ideological affiliation. How does protest feel, and who is doing the feeling? It considers the performativity of protest. It pays particular regard to the extent to which protest achieves change (however this is defined) and the ways in which historical protests help to inform judgements of the conduct, legitimacy and efficacy of current protest actions. What historical instances are invoked to draw comparisons to current forms of activism and resistance? How do contemporary protests draw on historical repertoires of protest that reflect or extend beyond their specific political contexts? Do protest strategies and tactics need to evolve as languages of protest become a default mode of mainstream political discourse? Our concern with the modal nature of protest, we suggest, might also be historicized. What is it about our times, our modes of communication, our political systems, that help to produce protest as a defining feature of contemporary political process?

We invite contributions in the form of longer essays (up to 7,000 words), shorter provocations (2,000 words) and artist pages. We also welcome suggestions for unique or hybrid formats.

Contributors may wish to draw on the following list of topics as a source of inspiration, although the list is not intended to be exhaustive or restrictive.

  • Staging/Representation of protest in mainstream media
  • Contemporary theatres of protest
  • Violent and non-violent protest
  • Criteria for the efficacy of protest
  • The triviality and ubiquity of protest
  • Populism and protest
  • Protest and the political right
  • Protest and the political left
  • The protestor as actor
  • The affective nature of protest
  • Protests and conspiracy theories
  • Hyperbole and protest
  • Social media and the performance of protest
  • Performative protest/Performativity of protest
  • Collective/Cultural memory of protest
  • Protest and national identity
  • Heroes of past/present protests (and their representation)
  • Protest in the social sciences versus protest in the humanities
  • Protest and change
  • The purpose of protest (thinking of performance

Schedule:

Proposals 8th March 2021

First Drafts July 2021

Final Drafts September 2021

Publication Jan/Feb 2022

ALL proposals, submissions and general enquiries should be sent direct to the PR office: info@performance-research.org

Issue-related enquiries should be directed to the issue editors:

Andy Lavender (andy.lavender@gsmd.ac.uk )

Julia Peetz (julia.peetz@warwick.ac.uk )

General Guidelines for Submissions:

  • Before submitting a proposal we encourage you to visit our website (www.performance-research.org ) and familiarize yourself with the journal.
  • Proposals will be accepted by e-mail (MS-Word or RTF). Proposals should not exceed one A4 side.
  • Please include your surname in the file name of the document you send.
  • Submission of images and visual material is welcome provided that all attachments do not exceed 5MB, and there is a maximum of five images.
  • Submission of a proposal will be taken to imply that it presents original, unpublished work not under consideration for publication elsewhere.
  • If your proposal is accepted, you will be invited to submit an article in first draft by the deadline indicated above. On the final acceptance of a completed article you will be asked to sign an author agreement in order for your work to be published in Performance Research.
Fri 22 Jan 2021, 09:54 | Tags: Publications Research Dr Julia Peetz Prof. Andy Lavendar

Prof. Nadine Holdsworth's latest article has been published in RiDE

Prof. Nadine Holdsworth's article 'Disrupting Monopoly: Homelessness, Gamification and Learned Resourcefulness' has just been published in @ride_journal (Research in Drama Education: The Journal of Applied Theatre and Performance), Volume 26 Issue 1.

Thu 21 Jan 2021, 09:22 | Tags: Publications Prof. Nadine Holdsworth Research

ONLINE SYMPOSIUM: THEATRE AND DEVELOPMENT PARTNERSHIPS - 23rd SEPTEMBER 2021

Bobby Smith is organising an online symposium 'Theatre and Development Partnerships'. The event will examine partnerships involving researchers, practitioners, donors and communities from the Global North and South and reflect on how we establish more equal, interconnected and mutually beneficial global partnerships in Theatre for Development (TfD) and applied and socially-engaged performance projects.
 
The symposium will ask:
  • What are the implications of the recent 'global turn' in development studies for those of us involved in theatre and performance projects that relate to development outcomes?
  • Might the renewed focus 'global partnerships', as outlined by the Sustainable Development Goals, offer new possibilities to work together? Or is it just more of the same empty rhetoric?
  • In terms of attempts to create more equal and mutually beneficial projects, what might success look like?
To join the symposium, or to find out more, please contact Bobby. Proposals for contributions are due 23rd April, and you can find the Call for Papers here:
Mon 18 Jan 2021, 20:05 | Tags: Research Dr Bobby Smith Call for Papers

PhD candidate Sky Herington wins the prestigious TaPRA Postgraduate Essay Prize

In December 2020, it was announced that Sky Herington has won the Theatre and Performance Research Association's prestigious Postgraduate Essay Prize. Sky's essay is called 'Grotesque Bodies & Subversive Healing: The Politics of the Belly in Two Plays by Sony Labou Tansi'.

Fri 18 Dec 2020, 12:47 | Tags: Publications Research Postgraduate Awards

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