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Health and Sustainable Development

Pills

GD204-15
or
GD204-30

Module Leader

Dr Marco J Haenssgen
Optional Core - Second year only
Either Terms 1 or 2 or Terms 1 and 2
15 or 30 CATS
15 workshop hours and 10 lecture hours
(15 CATS variant)

30 workshop hours and 20 lecture hours

(30 CATS variant)

Not available to students outside the School for Cross-Faculty Studies.



Please note: The information on this page relates to the 2019-20 academic year.

Principal Aims

This module offers an in-depth examination of Sustainable Development Goal 3 (“good health and well-being”) and the broader field of global health. The module will involve a blend of conceptual foundations, case study analysis, and work with real-life qualitative and quantitative data. Teaching and case studies will be interdisciplinary, drawing on medical as well as social science research.

The module is offered each of terms 1 and 2 (as a 15 CATS module) and as a 30 CATS module available across terms 1 and 2.

In Term 1, the focus is on concepts and dimensions of global health, equipping students with a big-picture understanding of health governance and health systems. The examination of a broad range of global health priorities within and beyond the Sustainable Development Goals will further enable students to grasp and discuss key issues that will dominate global health in the coming decades (e.g. universal healthcare, antimicrobial resistance), their relationship to international development and other sustainable development goals, and their global and local dimensions.
In Term 2, the module focuses on cross-cutting issues that consistently intersect global health issues and policies. We will explore human behaviour and contextual influences thereof through case studies like anti-vaccine movements and precarious living environments. Term 2 also addresses health policy processes and interventions, covering among others tensions between local and global health knowledge, unintended consequences of health policy implementation, and methods to evaluate health interventions.

Principal Learning Outcomes

By the end of the module, students will be able to:

  • Appreciate economic, social, environmental, and governance dimensions of global health issues
  • Understand and evaluate un-/intended outcomes of health interventions and policies
  • Develop balanced and theoretically grounded arguments on the potential and limitations of technical solutions for health problems
  • Critically analyse the ways in which changing contexts affect people’s health
  • Apply qualitative and quantitative research methods to global health issues

Syllabus

Term 1

Following an introduction to global health and development, we examine,

  • Polity and Governance (Weeks 2 and 3): We explore the global and local governance (or absence thereof) of health, historical trajectories that define current governance arrangements and the structures of national health systems.
  • Global health priorities (Weeks 4 to 10): We will study specific topics of global health within the Sustainable Development Goal 3 (e.g. universal healthcare, health emergency preparedness) and topics outside the SDGs that are likely to dominate global health agendas in the coming decades (e.g. multimorbidity, antimicrobial resistance).

Term 2

The introductory week of this module will outline cross-cutting issues in health and sustainable development, and their analytical power in interrogating and challenging current global health practice. We study these issues in detail in the remainder of Term 2:

  • Behaviour and Context (Weeks 2 to 5): Health policy often makes strong simplifying assumptions about human behaviour. We will explore ways in which we can conceptualise behaviour and analyse case studies on topics such as the politicisation of vaccines and the influences of precarity on treatment-seeking behaviour.
  • Policy and intervention (Weeks 6 to 10): We will revisit the policy process underlying global health, in which we scrutinise discourses, power, implementation dynamics, unintended (and often obscured) side-effects of health interventions, and methods to evaluate health policy and interventions.

Assessment for 30 CAT Module





Assessment for 15 CAT Module Term 1



Assessment for 15 CAT Module Term 2