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Bodies, Health and Sustainable Development

GD204 SDGs
GD204-30

Module Leader

Dr Stephanie Panichelli-Batalla
Optional Core - Second year only
Terms 1 - 2
30 CATS
40 seminars hours

Not available to students outside the School for Cross-Faculty Studies


GD204-15
Option - Second year only
Term 1 (Visiting students only may take the module in Term 2 only)
15 CATS
20 seminar hours

Term 1 variant not available to students outside the School for Cross-Faculty Studies.

Term 2 variant only available to visiting students


Principal Aims

This module examines, in depth, the ways in which our bodies relate to various forms of development. It engages with the Sustainable Development goals around “Good Health and Well-being” (Goal 3), “Gender Equality” (Goal 5) and “Reduced Inequalities” (Goal 10).

The module is taught over two terms. Although the three SDGs will be discussed in both terms, the first term focuses mainly on bodies, health and sustainable development (SDG3 and SDG10), and the second term on bodies, inequalities and sustainable development (SDG5 and 10).

Principal Learning Outcomes

By the end of the module students will be able to:

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of major global concerns around health, inequalities and development

Apply a deep and detailed understanding of SDG3, 5 and 10, and their constituent targets to analyse bodies and health from the perspective of the sustainable development agenda.

Apply a deep and detailed understanding of the ways in which a people’s understanding of Health, Well-being and Illness is mediated through cultural and social norms

Critically analyse the ways in which the changing environment has affected people’s health

Apply a critical approach to analysing the impact of existing and new inequalities on the sustainable development agenda

Critically analyse the impact of the changing environment on the sustainable development agenda

Understand measures put in place to address the most serious health-related global crises; and critically reflect on their efficacy

Understand measures put in place to address inequalities of health and bodies at national, international or global level; and critically reflect on their efficacy.

Generate original, well-researched and evidence-based suggestions to address health and inequalities-related crisis

Syllabus

The module is taught around 4 areas of intellectual enquiry.


We examine these areas by responding to a set of provocations around national and global concerns:

Term 1

How do societies allocate responsibility for Health? (weeks 1-5)

• Using a case-study approach we examine scenarios from different parts of the world which detail the ways in which cultures, traditions and the natural environment have shaped societies’ understanding of health and well-being.

• We ask context-relevant provocative questions in relation to each case-study:

Is there equal access to healthcare? • Are there continued inequalities in health status? What has exacerbated / diminished this? • Does healthcare have a more social focus (e.g. care)? • How is society sharing responsibility for health care (e.g. among families, communities etc)? • Is healthcare focused on prevention or cure? • Do people manage their own healthcare treatment and diagnosis, instead of medical practitioners.


Major global concerns around Health and Development (weeks 6-10)

• Using a case-study approach we examine scenarios from different parts of the world which analyse major concerns around Health and Development

• We ask context-relevant provocative questions in relation to each case-study:

• How do developing countries access affordable vaccines and medicines? Are patent rights reduced in case of outbreaks in developing countries? • How are global health crisis dealt with and where is there space for improvement? • Are food and nutrition a more integrated part of healthcare?

• We also ask to what extent the SDGs respond to national and global concerns: “SDG 3 aspires to ensure health and well-being for all, including a bold commitment to end the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and other communicable diseases by 2030”. • SDG 3 “aims to achieve universal health coverage, and provide access to safe and effective medicines and vaccines for all.” We consider the interventions that have been implemented to address: Child Mortality; Maternal Mortality; HIV / AIDS; Malaria; Tuberculosis, among others.

Term 2

In Term 2, we focus mainly on SDG 5 and SDG10. We ask to what extent will the Sustainable Development Goals respond to national and global concerns? (weeks 1-10)


• “SDG 5 aspires to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls”. We consider and critically assess the targets that have been set for this goal and we study the social, environmental and economic contexts that impact on their success.


• “SDG 10 aspires to reduce inequality within and among countries”. We consider and critically assess the targets around disability rights and the empowering of marginalised communities.


• Using a case-study approach we examine scenarios from different parts of the world which analyse major concerns around Inequalities. We will discuss issues linked to inequalities such as age, gender, sexual orientation, race, disabilities, among others. We will also discuss the ways in which societies adapt to existing and newly appearing inequalities and we will consider alternative interventions.



Assessment for 30 CAT Module





Assessment for 15 CAT Module Term 1



Assessment for 15 CAT Module Term 2