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Keir Wotherspoon (Teaching Fellow)

Keir Wotherspoon (Teaching Fellow)

I am interested in how social and political actors and movements have intersected with mass mediated, networked and digital technologies, often making historically decisive contributions to how we think about the media environment and what constitutes the ‘public’. In studying the period since World War II, I have deployed intermedial and genealogical methodologies in my historical research to understand the ways in which media experiments moved fluidly between communications forms. I’m interested in the translations that occur in this process as well as the reoccurrence of themes, ideas and practices. My PhD dissertation examined the social, cultural and intellectual ruptures that reordered how Americans thought about what made mass media technologies democratic, orienting cultural attitudes and policy towards a new set of understandings about distributed networked communication.

Research Profile

Media history and theory; intermedial histories; social media and social movements; genealogies of the digital turn; digital humanities, popular and cultural history of the United States, and post-colonial histories.

Academic Background

I began my teaching career the University of Melbourne, where I completed my PhD in 2017. My postgraduate study was undertaken in the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, where I taught subjects in U.S. and global history as well Arts faculty foundational subjects in democracy studies and gender studies. I hold a BA Honours (first class) in History from the Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. Before joining CIM, I was a Research Officer at La Trobe University, Australia (2013 -2016) and a Post Doctoral Research Associate at King’s College, London (2017-2018). I began my career as a historical researcher at the Waitangi Tribunal Research Unit in New Zealand.

Modules Taught

IM930 – Futures Past: the Sixties Counterculture and the Origins of the Digital Revolution

Publications

"Convergence and Divergence: The Radical Origins of the Network Revolution and Its Transformation of the Public Sphere," 2017. PhD Dissertation. Department of History, University of Melbourne.

Keir Wotherspoon “History From Below: The First Decade of the Melbourne Historical Journal”, in Written into History: Fifty Years of the Melbourne Historical Journal 1961-2011, in Keir Wotherspoon and Erik Ropers (eds.), (Melbourne Historical Journal research series; no. 1.: Melbourne, 2012), 15-32.

Keir Wotherspoon, “‘A Controversy About Ideas Is Again in the Air’: The Postgraduate Revival of the Printed Word, 1981–1989”, in Keir Wotherspoon and Erik Ropers (eds.), Written into History: Fifty Years of the Melbourne Historical Journal 1961-2011, (Melbourne Historical Journal research series; no. 1.: Melbourne, 2012), 209-222.

Keir Wotherspoon, “‘Adrift in the World’: Postgraduate Life and the MHJ in the Twenty-First Century”, in Keir Wotherspoon and Erik Ropers (eds.), Written into History: Fifty Years of the Melbourne Historical Journal 1961-2011, (Melbourne Historical Journal research series; no. 1.: Melbourne, 2012), 391-408.

“‘Have you any Uni. Archives?’: Frank Strahan and the Melbourne Historical Journal Archives,” UMA Bulletin, No 31, July 2012.

Conference Papers & Public Speaking

"When the Cyberculture Met the New Left: 1968 and the radicalization of the public sphere," 1968 and Its Legacies Symposium, King’s College London, June 15th – Sunday, June 15-17 2018.

“‘We will not recover from the change’: Network Democracy and the Legacy of the Sixties Underground Press.” HOTCUS 2017 Annual Conference, University College, University of Dublin. 16-18 June 2017.

Paper: “‘Post-political’: The Sixties and the Networked Communications Revolution.” Voices of Dissent Conference, Rothermere American Institute, University of Oxford. 2 June 2017.

Podcast interview about my research. “Networked Histories,” Dirt 2016, http://dirtspace.com/ podcast release: 30 October 2016.

“The Radical Origins of the Network Revolution and its Transformation of the Public Sphere.” School of Historical and Philosophical Studies Seminar Series, University of Melbourne, Australia. 18 December 2014.

“Buckminster Fuller’s Geodesic Public Sphere: Futurist Alternatives to Mass Media and Mass Society.” Australian Historical Association, University of Wollongong, Australia. 8 – 12 July 2013

“American Translations: Access and Democracy in U.S. Media Culture, 1960-1972.” Australian Historical Association Conference, University of Adelaide, Australia. 9 – 13 July 2012.

Joanna Cuttell

Contact

Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies
B0.05
University of Warwick
Coventry
CV4 7AL


Email: Keir.Wotherspoon@warwick.ac.uk

Spring term office hours: Thursdays 1-3.