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Seminar 1: Racism, feminism and the politics of fundamentalism in Britain

Wednesday, December 5, 2018
3-5 pm Council Chambers, Senate House

Seminar Tutor: Pragna Patel, Southall Black Sisters

Pragna Patel is a founding member of the Southall Black Sisters (SBS), a non-profit service and campaigning organisation for black and ethnic minority women, with a focus on domestic violence, immigration, religious fundamentalism and racism. In 2011, The Guardian named her among the Top 100 Women: Activists and Campaigners.

This is the first of two interdisciplinary pilot seminars that draws its inspiration from the Warwick-based online peer-reviewed journal called Feminist Dissent. The module’s focus is to develop understanding of a worldwide proliferation of fundamentalist religious movements and the global rise of conservative and racist populist movements taking place in the context of the ongoing crises of capitalism and resources. The first of these seminars will focus on the politics of feminism, racism and religious fundamentalism in Britain.
The seminar is open to all University of Warwick students. Registered students will receive a certificate of participation. Places are limited.

Please register, to secure a place click here!

The seminar will take place at Warwick, but will be simultaneously attended by a live global audience of students, academics, activists and artists, who will send in their questions and comments for discussion.
Suggested readings will be uploaded shortly.

If you would like to participate remotely online please register here: https://feministdissent-webinar1.eventbrite.co.uk/

Seminar 2:

Everyday Bordering: Gender, Race and Migration in an Intersectional Perspective

Date: Wednesday 8 May 2019

Time: 2.30-4.30 pm

Venue: International Portal (R0.12, Ramphal Building)

Seminar Tutor: Professor Nira Yuval-Davis

Nira Yuval-Davis is Professor Emeritus, Honorary Director of the Research Centre on Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB) at the University of East London. She has been the President of the Research Committee 05 (on Racism, Nationalism, Indigeneity and Ethnic Relations) of the International Sociological Association, founder member of Women Against Fundamentalism and the international research network on Women In Militarized Conflict Zones and has acted as a consultant for various UN and human rights organisations. Nira Yuval-Davis has won the 2018 International Sociological Association Distinguished Award for Excellence in Research and Practice. She has written widely on intersected gendered nationalisms, racisms, fundamentalisms, citizenships, identities, belonging/and everyday bordering as well as on situated intersectionality and dialogical epistemology. Among her books are Woman-Nation-State, 1989, Racialized Boundaries,1992, Unsettling Settler Societies, 1995, Gender and Nation, 1997, The Warning Signs of Fundamentalism, 2004, The Politics of Belonging: Intersectional Contestations, 2011, Women Against Fundamentalism, 2014 and Bordering (Forthcoming). Her works have been translated into more than ten languages.

Abstract:

The seminar explores contemporary bordering and the ways in which borders have moved from the margins into the centre of everyday lives. Connecting everyday bordering to the neo-liberal globalisation’s double crisis of governability and governmentality, the seminar links everyday bordering to the rise of the autochthonic right and to the transformation of citizenship duties, transforming citizens to unpaid untrained borderguards. It also examines the spread of grey zones and limbo spaces in and outside the borders and the ways more and more people embody borders instead of crossing them.

The seminar will use illustrative examples from empirical research which has used situated intersectionality as an epistemological and methodological approach in which ‘the truth’ can be approached via encompassing the differential situated gazes of the participants in different social encounters.