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Exam information

When is the exam?

The examination will take place on the Friday of the first week of Term 3, Friday 27th April, starting at 14.00 pm, in Rootes Panorama Room.

Do I need a calculator?

Calculations may (or may not) be set in Section A, so you are advised to bring a calculator with you to the examination. (Any calculation would be no more advanced than those which appear in the lecture notes, and would not require any mathematical sophistication beyond GCSE level.)

Are there any available past papers for this module?

Yes, and they can be accessed in the right hand column of this page.

What is the structure of the examination in 17/18?

The structure is broadly similar to that used in 16/17.

Students taking the 7.5 CATs version will answer Section A only, and you will have 1.5 hours.

Students taking the 15 CATs version of the module will answer both Section A and Section B, and you will have 3 hours. (Both sections will be handed out at the beginning of the examination. You are advised to spend 1.5 hours on Section A and 1.5 hours on Section B. You will hand in your answers to both sections at the end of the 3 hours.)

Section A will consist of 8 compulsory questions. Each question in Section A will be equally weighted, so you are advised to spend approximately 10 minutes on each question, with 10 minutes left at the end for checking. Material from any of the lectures may be examined (except from the guest lecture in week 10, which is non-examinable).

Section B has three sub-sections: one on the science of climate change, one on the politics/economics of climate change, and one which is interdisciplinary. Students taking Section B will have to answer one question from each subsection (the sub-section on the science of climate change will contain only one question; the two other sub-sections will each contain more than one question). All 3 questions that you answer in Section B will be equally weighted, so you are advised to spend approximately 30 minutes on each. Material from any of the lectures and seminars may be examined (except from the guest lecture in week 10, which is non-examinable). Anything you have learned through reading outside the lectures, and especially through paying attention to current events, will of course be welcomed. We do not expect you to memorise quotes or give precise references, but some indication of where ideas and views come from is an advantage.

Are there any mark schemes published for the past papers?

We do not publish mark schemes for past papers. However feedback on the 16/17 examination is available from the right hand column of this page. This is because, unlike examinations in mathematics and physics, there are often many ways of answering a question well! Please see the next question for further advice on exam technique.

Do you have any advice on exam technique?

As discussed above, you should allocate approximately 10 minutes to answer each question in Section A. Please answer in prose, and not bullet points. Try not to be repetitive in your answers, and make sure you address the question asked. Write in simple straightforward language.