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Dr Robert Dallmann

Dr Robert Dallmann

Dr Robert Dallmann
University of Warwick
Who is your scientific inspiration and why?

Nicholas Mrosovsky, PhD, FRSC (1934-2015). He has significantly contributed to entirely different fields of leatherback sea turtle conservation as well as physiology, where he first described the sliding setpoint principle, worked on hibernation and circadian biology. His work ethic was to be aspired to. Not only had he great passion for science, but he always scrutinised the details of the methods and results before drawing any conclusions; of his own data as much as those of others, for the benefit of the scientific community. Romanian born, and educated in Cambridge, UK, he worked in Toronto, Canada, for most of his career, and tongue-in-cheek displayed his FRSC certificate on the wall of the outhouse at his cabin in Ontario’s Cottage Country.

In three words or phrases how would you describe your supervision style?

Collaborative, supportive, creative.

In one or two sentences please describe your strategies regarding the following.
Provision of training:

Your hands on lab training will be supervised by the people best suited to do this (usually experienced researchers (post docs/PhD students). If that is not feasible, I will train you or help to arrange training. In any case, we will discuss what is needed in detail at the beginning of the project.

Progression monitoring and management:

While I do expect that you are driving your project and share progress with me in regular intervals, I am here for advice and guidance on how to develop your approach and define next steps.

Communication:

I have an open door policy, which means that my students can get in touch any time. We use a lab chat on Teams as well as a WhatsApp group to keep in touch.

How often do your PhD students see you in a timetabled group meeting?

At least once per week

In year 1 of PhD study, how often do your PhD students have a scheduled >30 minute 1:1 meeting with you?

At least once per fortnight

In year 2 of PhD study, how often do your PhD students have a scheduled >30 minute 1:1 meeting with you?

At least once per month

In year 3 of PhD study, how often do your PhD students have a scheduled >30 minute 1:1 meeting with you?

At least once per month

What form do your 1:1 meetings with PhD students take?

Face to face (if allowed under current health and safety advice)

Open door policy?

Yes, I am usually contactable for an instant response (if required) on every working day.

My expectation of PhD student working patterns?

Certain tasks in my lab need to occur at set times, and students need to be able to commit to a rota/timetable shared with other members of the team.

Notice for feedback (e.g. on reports, manuscript drafts, thesis chapters)?

I need at least 1 week’s notice to provide feedback on written work of up to 5000 words.