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GeMVi: Application of Genomics and Modelling to the Control of Virus Pathogens

High throughput pathogen sequencing and predictive models underpin the modern approach to understanding community spread and optimal control of infectious diseases. In this field, despite high disease burden, low income countries have been left behind.

GeMVi aims to reduce this deficit in East Africa, combining strengths of University of Warwick, KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme (Kenya) and other East African Institutes. GeMVi will engage health authorities and institutes, identify priority questions and link output to policy; fund 20 high calibre Research Fellows on locally relevant projects; transfer sequencing technologies, share bioinformatic methods and develop modelling capacity; generate new understanding through predictive modelling and virus sequence data.

Ultimately GeMVi aims at provision of evidence for intervention decisions, a sustainable collaborative network in the Region, and an Alliance on Virus Prevention and Control Preparedness.

GeMVi is looking to recruit East African Research Fellows for up to 4-9 months, with a focus on enhancing the Fellow's skills in pathogen sequencing or predictive modelling applied to local public-health problems. Potential applicants should complete a application form, although we strongly encourage you to contact either JNokes at kemri-wellcome dot org (pathogen sequencing) or M dot J dot Keeling at warwick dot ac dot uk (predictive modelling) to discuss you proposal.

Application for Research Fellowships now open.

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Funded by NIHR
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Main Investigators

james-nokes
James Nokes

Matt Keeling
Matt Keeling

Sam Kinyanjui
Sam Kinyanjui

Etienne de Villiers
Etienne de Villiers

Funding Statement: The research was commissioned by the National Institute for Health Research using Official Development Assistance (ODA) funding.

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care.