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Ozer, EA; Nnah, E; Didelot, X; Whitaker, RJ; Hauser, AR (2019) The Population Structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Characterized by Genetic Isolation of exoU+ and exoS+ Lineages. Genome Biology & Evolution 11 1780-1796

Ozer, EA; Nnah, E; Didelot, X; Whitaker, RJ; Hauser, AR (2019) The Population Structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Characterized by Genetic Isolation of exoU+ and exoS+Lineages. Genome Biology & Evolution 11 1780-1796

The diversification of microbial populations may be driven by many factors including adaptation to distinct ecological niches and barriers to recombination. We examined the population structure of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by analyzing whole-genome sequences of 739 isolates from diverse sources. We confirmed that the population structure of P. aeruginosa consists of two major groups (referred to as Groups A and B) and at least two minor groups (Groups C1 and C2). Evidence for frequent intragroup but limited intergroup recombination in the core genome was observed, consistent with sexual isolation of the groups. Likewise, accessory genome analysis demonstrated more gene flow within Groups A and B than between these groups, and a few accessory genomic elements were nearly specific to one or the other group. In particular, the exoS gene was highly overrepresented in Group A compared with Group B isolates (99.4% vs. 1.1%) and the exoU gene was highly overrepresented in Group B compared with Group A isolates (95.2% vs. 1.8%). The exoS and exoU genes encode effector proteins secreted by the P. aeruginosa type III secretion system. Together these results suggest that the major P. aeruginosa groups defined in part by the exoS and exoU genes are divergent from each other, and that these groups are genetically isolated and may be ecologically distinct. Although both groups were globally distributed and caused human infections, certain groups predominated in some clinical contexts.

Fri 20 Sep 2019, 12:50