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Dr Amol Bhandare

 

Title   

Research Fellow
 

Contact   

Life Sciences
University of Warwick
Coventry
CV4 7AL
Tel: +44 247 65 22697
Email: A.Bhandare@warwick.ac.uk

Research Interests

Cardiorespiratory autonomic system is essential for the maintenance of normal blood pressure, excretion of carbon dioxide and intake of oxygen. The system is controlled by nuclei present in the brainstem such as RVLM, CVLM, NTS, RTN, pre-Böt, Böt etc. The different disease conditions, such as epilepsy and sleep apnea, disturb the normal cardiorespiratory autonomic function, which can also lead to a death.

My current work is focused on in vivo imaging of single neuron to understand the role of ATP in central chemosensory control of breathing using genetically encoded fluorescent reporters and Gradient Index (GRIN) optics in freely behaving animals. My interest also extends to understand the role of inflammation during epilepsy and sleep apnea and response of glia (microglia) and neuropeptides in the vicinity of cardiorespiratory autonomic nuclei to maintain the normal cardiorespiratory activity


Biography

PhD in Neurosciences from Macquarie University Sydney, Australia
Research Assistant at Department of Pharmacology, University of Virginia, USA
M.Pharm Pharmacology from University of Pune, India

Member, Society for Neurosciences
Member, International Society for Neurochemistry
Member, Australian Society for Neurosciences

Publications

Journals
  • Bhandare, Amol M., Kapoor, Komal, Powell, Kim L., Braine, Emma, Casillas-Espinosa, Pablo, O'Brien, Terence J., Farnham, Melissa M. J., Pilowsky, Paul M., 2017. Inhibition of microglial activation with minocycline at the intrathecal level attenuates sympathoexcitatory and proarrhythmogenic changes in rats with chronic temporal lobe epilepsy. Neuroscience, 350, pp. 23-38, View
  • Bhandare, Amol M., Kapoor, Komal, Farnham, Melissa M. J., Pilowsky, Paul M., 2016. Microglia PACAP and glutamate : friends or foes in seizure-induced autonomic dysfunction and SUDEP?. Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology, 226, pp. 39-50, View
  • Kapoor, Komal, Bhandare, Amol M., Nedoboy, Polina E., Mohammed, Suja, Farnham, Melissa M. J., Pilowsky, Paul M., 2016. Dynamic changes in the relationship of microglia to cardiovascular neurons in response to increases and decreases in blood pressure. Neuroscience, 329, pp. 12-29, View
  • Kapoor, Komal, Bhandare, Amol M., Mohammed, Suja, Farnham, Melissa M.J., Pilowsky, Paul M., 2016. Microglial number is related to the number of tyrosine hydroxylase neurons in SHR and normotensive rats. Autonomic Neuroscience, 198, pp. 10-18, View
  • Bhandare, Amol M., Kapoor, K., Pilowsky, P. M., Farnham, Melissa M. J., 2016. Seizure-induced sympathoexcitation is caused by activation of glutamatergic receptors in RVLM that also causes proarrhythmogenic changes mediated by PACAP and microglia in rats. Journal of Neuroscience, 36 (2), pp. 506-517, View
  • Kapoor, Komal, Bhandare, Amol M., Farnham, Melissa M. J., Pilowsky, Paul M., 2016. Alerted microglia and the sympathetic nervous system : a novel form of microglia in the development of hypertension. Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology, 226, pp. 51-62, View
  • Nedoboy, P. E., Mohammed, S., Kapoor, K., Bhandare, Amol M., Farnham, M. M. J., Pilowsky, P. M., 2016. pSer40 tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry identifies the anatomical location of C1 neurons in rat RVLM that are activated by hypotension. Neuroscience, 317, pp. 162-172, View
  • Bhandare, Amol M., Mohammed, S., Pilowsky, P. M., Farnham, M. M. J., 2015. Antagonism of PACAP or microglia function worsens the cardiovascular consequences of kainic-acid-induced seizures in rats. Journal of Neuroscience, 35 (5), pp. 2191-2199, View

View All Publications

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Research Themes:

Biomedical Science