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Financial benefits of footrot intervention programme

Use this page to calculate how much you could gain financially if you use our recommended intervention programme in your flock.

This calculation is based on data from a study on one lowland spring-lambing commercial flock with 800 ewes and a lambing % of 157. The study ran from tupping (October 2005) to tupping (October 2006). As such the calculation is an example and may not be compatible with other types of sheep production systems. However, playing with the figures may give you some indication of the possible financial gains from using our management programme through an increase in the number of lambs produced and a faster growth rate in lambs.

For our calculations we assume a difference in value for lambs finished before weaning (finished lambs) and after weaning (store lambs). (See 'Costs And Time'). Store lambs will either be sold on to other farms at a lower value or incur extra feeding and health costs when kept on the farm longer. We therefore ask you to estimate the proportion of lambs being finished before weaning in your flock.

We also ask you for the average percent of ewes that are lame in your flock in a year.

Calculation values






. per hour


Costs and time

We have based our calculation on the following values for the costs of treatment material and treatment times.

You can enter your own values in the boxes, then click on the "Calculate" button to repeat the calculation with the new values.

£.


£.


£.


£.


mins


mins


mins


Assumptions

We have made the following assumptions, based on the results of our study on a single lowland spring-lambing commercial flock:

  • Expected lameness level if intervention programme is followed:
  • Number of ewes caught annually per 100 ewes in the flock after lameness is reduced to target levels:
  • Number of ewes treated annually per 100 ewes in the flock after lameness is reduced to target levels:
  • Number of lambs caught annually per 100 ewes in the flock after lameness is reduced to target levels:
  • Number of lambs treated annually per 100 lambs in the flock after lameness is reduced to target levels:
  • Increase in proportion of lambs reared per percentage decrease in lameness:
  • Increase in proportion of lambs finished at weaning per percentage decrease in lameness: