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Footrot: In brief

Footrot has two stages: interdigital dermatitis (also known as scald or strip) and severe footrot.

The information and videos below will tell you more about how to diagnose and treat these two stages.

 

 


Scald diagnosis:

Red or pink skin with a white or grey scum between the toes, usually with a strong smell.

Scald treatment:
  • Treat adults with a long-acting antibiotic injection and antibiotic spray on all four feet; ensure you give the correct dose of antibiotic for the weight of the sheep.
  • Treat lambs with antibiotic spray on all four feet. Where levels of scald are high (e.g. in spring) footbath the whole group.
 
Severe footrot diagnosis:

Separation of hoof horn from sensitive tissue underneath and a grey, oozing pus with a distinctive foul smell.

Severe footrot treatment:
  • Treat all cases with long-acting antibiotic injection and antibiotic spray on all four feet; ensure you give the correct dose of antibiotic for the weight of the sheep.
Important points
  • Do not trim horntrimming delays healing.
  • Make sure you are treating cases of footrot within 3 days of the sheep becoming lame. If you have an extensive system (e.g. hill farms), do not turn out any lame sheep: treat them and keep them separate until they are sound.
  • Separate lame sheep wherever possible
  • Record all sheep that you treat and mark the lame limb with durable spray; cull ewes that require 2 or more treatments in a season.
Follow this link to see how much money your farm could save by treating lameness quickly and accurately.
What to do next:

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