Skip to main content

Piyatida Amnuaykan

EDUCATION

2010-Present School of life Sciences, University of Warwick, UK 

PhD in Plant and Environmental Sciences

2009- 2010 University of Reading, UK

M.Sc. in Horticulture

2005-2008 Mahidol University, Thailand

B.Sc. in Biology (Distinction Program)

2nd class Honors-GPA (3.43/4.00)

TRAININGS/SEMINARS

Attended the 7th EPSO Conference (Plants for a Greening Economy), 1-4 September 2013, Greece and presented the poster related to my PhD project, Environmental and Genetic Regulation of Juvenility in Antirrhinum majus

Attended the Postgraduate Symposium (2013) by School of life sciences, The university of Warwick and gave a talk about Environmental and Genetic Regulation of Juvenility in Antirrhinum majus

Postgraduate Training in Statistics (2013)

Attended the Postgraduate Symposium (2012) by School of life sciences, The university of Warwick and presented the poster, Environmental and Genetic Regulation of Juvenility in Antirrhinum majus

Attended the Postgraduate Symposium (2011) by School of life sciences, The university of Warwick and submitted an abstract related to my PhD project, Environmental and Genetic Regulation of Juvenility in Antirrhinum majus

The Postgraduate Certificate in Transferable Skills in Science (Module: Team Working and Networking 2011), The university of Warwick

Endnote Basic (Web) Traning (2011), The university of Warwick

Flower Invertebrates as Potential Predators of Pest Thrips in Thailand An undergraduate submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of bachelor of science (biology)

Successfully completed the Summer Research Training Program (2007) under Thailand Advanced Institute of Science and Technology’s Pilot Scholarship Project in the Biotechnology Research Unit (Plant Physiology laboratory)at NSTDA, National Science and Technology Development Agency

Certificate, Successfully participating in the English Training Program(2003) offered by First Global Community College

RESEARCH

I am currently working as a PhD student in Professor Brian Thomas’s group, School of life sciences, university of Warwick. My current research is about the study of environmental and genetic regulation of juvenility in Antirrhinum majus.

 

ABSTRACT

JP

Environmental and genetic regulation of Juvenility in Antirrhinum majus

Whilst juvenile during vegetative growth, plants are incapable of initiating flowering when grown under floral inductive conditions. Understanding juvenility is important since it influences flowering time, which in turn impacts on scheduling of crop production. The project aims are to determine the effect of light integral on 1) photosynthetic assimilation and partitioning in relation to juvenility and 2) the expression of key flowering time genes, including FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), and genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Transfer experiments have been carried out to generate material differing in juvenility length for molecular and biochemical analyses. These utilised antirrhinum plants grown under different light integrals and Arabidopsis mutants defective in specific carbohydrate related genes. cDNAs representing genes involved in starch synthesis (PHOSPHOGLUCOMUTASE(PGM), PHOSPHOGLUCOISOMERASE(PGI), SUCROSE PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE(SPS) ) and degradation (STARCH EXCESS1(SEX-1), BETA AMYLASE3(BAM-3), ALPHA AMYLASE(AMY)) have been isolated from antirrhinum plants. Antirrhinum plants grown under reduced light integrals had extended juvenile and adult vegetative phases and reduced levels of FT, PGM, PGI, SEX-1, and BAM-3 during juvenility. Juvenility was shown to be extended in mutants defective in both starch synthesis and starch degradation. This indicates that levels of oligosaccharide, released during starch degradation, may influence the length of juvenility. Consistently, in both Arabidopsis and antirrhinum, the timing of FT induction was shown to correlate with the end of juvenility.

 


 

 

for_profile.jpg

Piyatida Amnuaykan

P dot Amnuaykan at warwick dot ac dot uk