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Projects

Study Title Study Lead Health & Social Care Partner Organisations Lay Summary
Early Intervention Services & Reduction in the Delay of Untreated Psychosis (DUP):
  1. Don’t turn your back on the symptoms of psychosis: a proof-of-principle, quasi-experimental public health trial to reduce the duration of untreated psychosis in Birmingham, UK.
  2. Sustaining Positive Engagement and Recovery (SUPEREDEN) – the next step after Early Intervention for Psychosis. Study 3: Improving social recovery in young people with emerging severe social disability: A proof of principle randomised controlled trial.
Prof Max Birchwood,
University of Warwick
Birmingham & Solihull Mental Health NHS
Foundation Trusts
 
Sustaining Positive Engagement and Recovery (SUPEREDEN) – the next step after Early Intervention for Psychosis. Study 3: Improving social recovery in young people with emerging severe social disability: A proof of principle randomised controlled trial. Prof Max Birchwood,
University of Warwick
Universities of Cambridge, Sussex, Norwich, Warwick, Manchester, King's College, London. Collaboration with CLAHRC East of England Psychosis is a mental health problem that causes people to lose contact with reality, and can involve hallucinations or delusions. Social recovery is a return to effective social functioning after treatment (engaging in constructive leisure and social activity and return to education or work). Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a talking therapy that is most commonly used to treat anxiety and depression, but can be useful for other mental health problems. The aim of this study is to assess whether Social Recovery Orientated Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (SRCBT) increases the time patients spend in structured activity and reduces their levels of depression and hopelessness.Who can participate?
150 patients with non-affective psychosis (psychosis that is not related to emotions or moods)What does the study involve?
Participants are randomly allocated to either the control or the experimental group. The experimental group receive regular SRCBT for 9 months. The control group receive treatment as usual. All participants are assessed at the start of the study and after 9 and 15 months.What are the possible benefits and risks of participating?
We have found from previous studies that most participants welcome participation in research studies, as even contact with the researchers conducting assessments offers support from concerned and trained professionals above that provided in standard care. This is potentially a very important study which could have important implications for clinical practice in mental health services.Where is the study run from?
The study is sponsored by Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation trust (BSMHFT) and recruitment will take place in Birmingham, Norfolk and Lancashire Early Intervention Services.
Schools Space Network Research:
  1. Understanding Risk Factors for the Development of Eating Disorders: A Qualitative Study.
  2. Prospective study of young people at risk of developing eating disorders: The ‘SchoolSpace’ project.
Charlotte Connor,
University of Warwick
  1. Secondary schools in
    Birmingham
  2. Birmingham City Council; Birmingham & Solihull Mental Health NHS
    Foundation Trusts
 
PARTNERS2: development and pilot trial of primary care based collaborative care for people with serious mental illness. Prof Max Birchwood,
University of Warwick
Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust; Devon Partnership Trust

This project represents a collaboration with NIHR CLAHRC South West Peninsula
This project aims to help primary care and community based mental health services work more closely together by developing a system of collaborative care based in GP surgeries for people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.
THE MILESTONE PROJECT: Managing the link and strengthening transition from child to adult mental health care. Prof Swaran Singh,
University of Warwick
Collaboration with CLAHRC East of England  
A pilot study to assess the feasibility and impact of a brief motivational intervention on problem drug and alcohol use in adult mental health inpatient units. Prof Alex Copello,
University of Birmingham
Birmingham & Solihull Mental Health NHS
Foundation Trust; University of Bath
 
Linear and non-linear brain changes over the transition to psychosis. Prof Stephen Wood,
University of Birmingham
Kings College London  
Women’s lived experiences of a First Episode of Psychosis (FEP): A qualitative analysis of the influence of gender on day-to-day experiences of FEP and related healthcare needs. Dr Anna Lavis,
University of Birmingham
   
Primary Care Mental Health Services
  1. Depression in adolescents and young adults: A matched case control study.
  2. PARTNERS2: development and pilot trial of primary care based collaborative care for people with serious mental illness.
  1. Prof Max Birchwood,
    University of Warwick;Prof. Tom Marshall,
    University of Birmingham
  2. Prof Max Birchwood,
    University of Warwick

  1. CLAHRC WM Theme 3; Primary care settings in Birmingham
  2. Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust; Devon Partnership Trust

    This project represents a collaboration with NIHR CLAHRC South West Peninsula
 
Healthcare Transitions
  1. How can health services effectively improve the mental health and wellbeing of young people leaving public care? The LYNC Study.
  2. THE MILESTONE PROJECT: Managing the link and strengthening transition from child to adult mental health care.
  3. A pilot study to assess the feasibility and impact of a brief motivational intervention on problem drug and alcohol use in adult mental health inpatient units.
  4. Linear and non-linear brain changes over the transition to psychosis.
  1. Prof Max Birchwood,
    Prof Swaran Singh,
    University of Warwick;
    Prof Doug Simkiss,
    Birmingham Community Healthcare NHS Trust
  2. Prof Swaran Singh,
    University of Warwick
  3. Prof Alex Copello,
    University of Birmingham
  4. Prof Stephen Wood,
    University of Birmingham
  1. Birmingham Community Healthcare NHS Trust; Birmingham City Council; Birmingham & Solihull Mental Health NHS
    Foundation Trusts
  2. Collaboration with NIHR CLAHRC East of England
  3. Birmingham & Solihull Mental Health NHS
    Foundation Trust; University of Bath
  4. Kings College London
 
Severe Mental Health Ilness
  1. Women’s lived experiences of a First Episode of Psychosis (FEP): A qualitative analysis of the influence of gender on day-to-day experiences of FEP and related healthcare needs.
  2. PARTNERS2: development and pilot trial of primary care based collaborative care for people with serious mental illness.
  1. Dr Anna Lavis,
    University of Birmingham
  2. Prof Max Birchwood,
    University of Warwick
  1. University of Birmingham
  2. Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust; Devon Partnership TrustThis project represents a collaboration with NIHR CLAHRC South West Peninsula
 
Depression in adolescents and young adults: A matched case control study. Prof Max Birchwood,
University of Warwick;Prof. Tom Marshall,
University of Birmingham
Primary care settings in Birmingham Approximately 80,000 children and young people in the UK suffer from severe depression but many fail to receive the treatment they require. This is often due to poor identification of early warning signs and risk factors, resulting in poor outcome and the likelihood of continued mental health problems into adulthood.In order to develop a prediction model for a first diagnosis of depression in young people aged 15-24, we analysed electronic primary care records.Strongest predictors were symptoms of depression and other psychological conditions. School problems and social services involvement were prominent predictors in males aged 15 to 18 years, work stress was a predictor in females aged 19 to 24 years. Our model is a first step in the development of a predictive model identifying early warning signs of depression in young people in primary care.
How can health services effectively improve the mental health and wellbeing of young people leaving public care? The LYNC Study. Prof Max Birchwood,
Prof Swaran Singh,
University of Warwick;
Prof Doug Simkiss,
Birmingham Community Healthcare NHS Trust
Birmingham Community Healthcare NHS Trust; Birmingham City Council; Birmingham & Solihull Mental Health NHS
Foundation Trusts