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Studentships with Funding

The following projects are currently available. Click on links to jump directly to the subject areas.
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medbio.gif Medical, biological and soft matter

More funded studentships will be advertised from the end of 2016 onwards for October 2017 start. In addition, there are a limited number of scholarships available for outstanding UK students for any of the projects/research areas listed on the projects page.



astro.gif Astronomy and Astrophysics,

Studentships are available for a 2017 start, see the group website for more project descriptions. Interviews are usually held from middle of February through to middle of March, expected application deadline is mid February but it is suggested that you apply earlier than that.


There is no news to report.



logo2.gif Condensed Matter Physics

The (experimental) Condensed Matter Physics research area includes many interacting research groups and facilities within the department. Students undertake the Materials Physics Doctorate scheme, giving access to a tailored research degree to help you exploit both our own outstanding materials growth, fabrication, characterisation and computational capabilities, and those at central facilities. A broad education in Materials Physics is provided through dedicated modules under the Midlands Physics Alliance Graduate School, and external courses.

Quantimony Project

Supervisor: Richard Beanland

Project details: here
Start date: October 2021.

Funding: generously funded PhD studentship see project details.

An H2020 Marie Sklodowska-Curie Actions funded PhD studentship position in Quantum Semiconductor Technologies exploiting Antimony is available in the Department of Physics at The University of Warwick. You will be part of a cohort of international early stage researchers working as part of the QUANTIMONY Innovative Training Network (ITN). This ITN combines a group of world-leading laboratories and organisations, where early stage researchers benefit from academic and industrial collaboration and research skill training.

FIND-CDT

Fully funded PhD projects based at the University of Warwick, for 2020 entry.

 PhD Studentship in Liquid Crystal Sensors for Ultrasound Detection

University: University of Warwick Supervisor: Dr Rachel Edwards Start date: October 2020

PhD Studentship in Automated Implementation of EMAT Inspection

University: University of Warwick Supervisor: Dr Rachel Edwards Start date: October 2020

PhD Studentship in Ultrasonic Flow Measurement

University: University of Warwick. Supervisor: Prof. Steve Dixon. Start date: October 2020

Centre for Doctoral Training in Diamond Science and Technology

Diamond is a material of such diverse application, who knows what it is capable of achieving?

Who knows? You know.

The DST CDT is a gateway to the best in the UK's diamond research. You could deepen your understanding of diamond's properties, and apply your knowledge of physics, engineering, chemistry, life sciences or materials. You could uncover new ways to utilise this material's unique structure. You could be at the international forefront of efforts to transform society through aerospace, or telecommunications, or electronics, or manufacturing…

Fully funded PhD projects based at the University of Warwick, in Diamond Science and Technology for 2020 entry.

New projects available - see https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/dst/phd_projects/

If you would like further information, or if you would like to discuss potential PhD projects, please provide contact details and forward your CV to dst.admin@warwick.ac.uk.

Warwick Centre for Doctoral Training in Analytical Sciences

The Warwick Centre for Doctoral Training in Analytical Sciences is recruiting the next generation of analytical scientists. With the world-leading facilities and expertise in Analytical Science at Warwick and partner external facilities (e.g., Diamond, ILL, ISIS) at their disposal, our students will graduate with a unique combination of skills in exploiting synergies between different experimental methods, e.g., diffraction, electrochemistry, mass spectrometry, microscopy and NMR, and in harnessing the power of combining data collection with experimental design, statistical analysis and simulation. Research and training will be delivered from across physical sciences, engineering and manufacturing, statistics, life and medical sciences in close partnership with industry, with research areas including pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals and additives, soft matter, biological systems, energy and functional materials.

How to apply: We invite applications from recent graduates with a strong first degree in any related discipline, including Chemistry, Engineering, Life Sciences, Mathematics, Pharmacy, Physics and Statistics. Studentships are available for UK citizens for September 2019 entry (full fees + consumables budget and minimum £14k stipend). EU students can apply for a limited number of stipends covering tuition fees. Applications are invited throughout the year.

Register your interest now

Centre for Doctoral Training in Modelling of Heterogeneous Systems

HetSys is an EPSRC-supported Centre for Doctoral Training. It recruits enthusiastic students from across the physical sciences who enjoy using their mathematical skills and thinking flexibly to solve complex problems. By developing these skills HetSys trains people to challenge current state-of-the-art in computational modelling of heterogeneous, ‘real world’ systems across a range of research themes such as nanoscale devices, new catalysts, superalloys, smart fluids, laser-plasma interactions etc. We plan to recruit up to 12 students to work on a range of exciting PhD projects starting in Oct.2021.

For more details please see the HetSys website. Please contact us at hetsys@warwick.ac.uk if you'd like to find out more.

Current projects with particular relevance to applicants interested in theoretical physics in combination with computational modelling:

Novel 'Twistronics' devices

How semiconductor lasers fail

Dislocation mobility and machine learning

Energy harvesting with thermoelectrics

Magnetic quasiparticles and storing information

Laser-driven fusion power

Noisy biochemical switches

Disentangling aggregation kinetics in CVD diamond for quantum sensing

PhD Studentship: Disentangling aggregation kinetics in CVD diamond for quantum sensing

Exceptional technological progress in diamond means that it is now at the forefront of many quantum technologies. For instance, diamond-based sensors can detect the magnetic field of a single atom and determine precisely what and where it is; or probe the fundamental nature of our universe by employing quantum entanglement between two diamonds. On the micro- and macroscopic scale, diamond-based quantum technologies are capable of sensing magnetic effects in bacteria, probing defects in computer chips, and providing highprecision magnetic navigation in challenging environments [1–9].

These amazing capabilities are enabled by “point-defects” – atomic-scale “faults” in the diamond crystal formed by displacing, replacing, and/or removing carbon atoms – within the diamond structure. Most quantum technology applications of diamond exploit the electro-optical and spin properties of the negatively-charged nitrogen-vacancy centre (NV– ) – a defect consisting of a nitrogen atom next to a missing atom (the vacancy).

It is an ongoing challenge to produce the ideal diamond material for NV-based quantum technologies – namely low-strain, low-parasitic-spin density, highly charge-stable material with tightly-controlled NV– concentrations. Recent advances in plasma-assisted chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond synthesis have opened up a new regime of material which is nominally ideal for quantum technology applications, but which is as-yet poorly understood. Creating optimal material for quantum technologies will require an intimate understanding of the defects present, their interactions, and how to modify, create, and destroy them in this new diamond material.

This ambitious project will combine Warwick’s world-leading understanding of diamond point defects and their interactions under annealing, with extensive state-of-the-art experimental facilities and novel CVD diamond. It is anticipated that this work will result in the identification and characterisation of several new point defects and will drive understanding on optimal strategies for producing high-nitrogen material for quantum technology applications. The research will be carried out in the physics department at Warwick, and will involve but is not limited to: • characterization and treatment of novel high-nitrogen CVD diamond to develop routes toward optimized material for ensemble quantum sensing • identification and characterization of novel defects using cryogenic optical and magnetic resonance techniques • understanding of defects’ electronic properties to deduce their chemical constituents and atomic configuration • production of defects by irradiation and high temperature treatment to optimize their properties and understand their interactions with other defects • interaction with the large multidisciplinary cohort of leading diamond researchers based at Warwick as part of the Centre for Doctoral Training in Diamond Science and Technology • regular meetings with leading diamond industry figures to help maximally exploit our new understanding For further details please contact Dr. Ben Green: b.green@warwick.ac.uk

[1] L. Rondin et al., Reports Prog. Phys. 77, 056503 (2014). [2] J. F. Barry et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 113, 14133 (2016). [3] B. Hensen et al., Nature 526, 682 (2015). [4] M. Atatüre et al., Nat. Rev. Mater. 3, 38 (2018). [5] M. K. Bhaskar et al., Nature 580, 60 (2020). [6] A. Horsley et al., Phys. Rev. Appl. 10, 044039 (2018). [7] G. Mariani et al., Sci. Rep. 10, 4813 (2020). [8] R. L. Patel et al., Phys. Rev. Appl. 14, 044058 (2020). [9] M. N. R. Ashfold et al., Chem. Rev. 120, 5745 (2020)



thcom.gifTheoretical condensed matter Physics

More funded studentships will be advertised from the end of 2016 onwards for October 2017 start. In addition, there are a limited number of scholarships available for outstanding UK students for any of the projects/research areas listed on the projects page.



cfsa.gif Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics



epp.gif Elementary particle Physics

The EPP group has funded studentships available for 2017 entry on any of the following projects. Please see group website for further details. Enquires can be made to Please send enquiries to Dr. Yorck Ramachers (y.a.ramachers@warwick.ac.uk) tel. 024 765 73878.

Elementary Particle Physics

The EPP group has funded studentships available for 2021 entry on the following projects. A short overview of the project areas can be found on the group website. Enquires can be made to Dr. Tom Blake (T.Blake.1@warwick.ac.uk).

Application deadline: January 31st 2021

Funding:

PhD studentships (typically 42 months) are available. Typically support is available for UK and EU students, while others are likely to need their own source of funding. Enquiries, including queries on possible sources of funding, from all potential candidates are welcome.

 

 

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“I chose Warwick for its great reputation for research”
Postgraduate Applicant, 2014
"I chose Warwick based on its reputation and quality of research. I thought the postgraduate course here would give me a chance to learn a wide range of skills necessary for a career in research"
Current Postgraduate, 2013