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Requirements Management and High-Level Design

Introduction

Principal module aim is to present both theoretical and practical best practice in Requirements Management for programmes and projects, plus the linkages of Requirements to programme planning, and their use in conception of product ‘architecture’. This module is designed to appeal to experienced System Designers who wish to step up to lead System Engineering teams. Many of the skills and subjects taught will be generic however some will be company specific and delivered by Company tutors.

Objectives

Upon successful completion participants will be able to:

  • Understand and be able to apply best practice approaches for Requirements Elicitation, Development and Management processes which are contextually pertinent.
  • Prepare Statements and Models of needs and requirements (functional and non-functional), and appreciate the need to communicate and liaise with Stakeholders in the development of Requirement Statements
  • Test, prioritise and discuss Requirements Statements in terms of accuracy, consistency, clarity, coherence, correlation to all sources of information, user’s needs and expectations. Recognise clashes of Requirements and take appropriate actions to resolve the resulting paradoxes.
  • Apply techniques which utilise Requirements Statements and Models to formulate concept designs and developmental strategies for products, exercising change control techniques and recognising evolution of the Requirements.
  • Use Requirements Statements and Models to compare and evaluate system concepts and programme outcomes and undertake lessons-learned exercises.

Syllabus

Elicitation, Capture, Statementing, and Utilisation of Requirements for the products that will be
the outputs of systems development programmes within the avionics industry.

Assessment

In-Module Assessment Exercises (20% mark)
PMA (80% Mark)

Duration

total contact hours - 40.5 hours (33 hours of lectures, 7.5 hours of practical classes)