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IDH Insights

Practical considerations for micro/nanotechnology enabled biosensors

The field of biosenso­­­rs, driven among others by recent advances in micro and nanotechnologies, has seen the development of ultra-sensitive sensors. The progress has been such that the limit of detection of many micro/nano-sensors is low enough for the early diagnosis of a range of diseases...

by Jerome Charmet, Assistant Professor in Biomedical Engineering.

Mon 06 March 2017, 10:16 | Tags: bionsensors, Author: Jerome Charmet

Working with SMEs to help them develop and test their products and applications through academic rigour and co-design principles

by Neil Bryant, IDH Business Development Manager

The Institute of Digital Healthcare (IDH) is working with small-medium sized enterprises (SMEs) to bring their innovations in healthcare technology to the marketplace...

Mon 13 February 2017, 10:37 | Tags: Innovate UK, SBRI, digital healthcare, SMEs

An App to Support Rehabilitation for Patients undergoing Lung Surgery

by Chris Golby

The Institute of Digital healthcare (IDH) is currently working on a project with the health Foundation and Heart of England Foundation Trust...

Mon 16 November 2015, 13:34 | Tags: Author: Chris Golby, m-health, rehabilitation

Non-invasive characterisation of childhood tumours

by Ahmed Fetit

Cancer is a leading cause of mortality in children, with the latest available statistics in the UK showing that...


How to know when “thinking goes wrong”

by Prof Theo Arvanitis

The brain is an amazing organ. It controls many of the functions of the human body – but it is also the organ that processes the information that allows us to understand things – including itself. It is also the last part of the human body to be fully understood. That is, in part, due to it being protected within the skull, but also because of the complexity of its operation. However, recent developments in biomedical imaging techniques are giving us new insight into how it works, how it goes wrong and how we go about fixing it.


It’s Not Just Consumers Who Are Excited by Google’s Ultimate Wearable Technology

by Dr Mark Elliott

We recently saw the announcement of Project Jacquard: sensing fabrics that will allow clothing to become interfaces and controllers of consumer devices. Embedded sensors within clothing will create the ultimate wearable devices that will allow the tracking of specific movements, not just activity. This will add to the array of recent consumer technologies that allow individuals to now monitor and manage their own health. The onset of smart sensing clothing could now revolutionise the self-management of physiotherapy and rehabilitation of movements.

Fri 21 August 2015, 12:57 | Tags: wearables, kinect, healthcare big data, Author: Mark Elliott

Too few, Too little, Too late: Why we are failing to reduce obesity in the UK

by Prof Caroline Meyer

On average, people in the UK are getting more and more overweight. This will continue to be the case unless we educate people better, provide better care within the NHS, develop brand new ways of helping overweight people in the community and change the rules and regulations about how foods are manufactured, advertised and sold within our society.

Fri 21 August 2015, 12:42 | Tags: self-monitoring, wearables, obesity, Author: Caroline Meyer