Coronavirus (Covid-19): Latest updates and information
Skip to main content Skip to navigation

News


Select tags to filter on

Our Associate Professors Jerome Charmet and George Despotou deliver the first WMG Associate Professor Lecture Series

Our Associate Professors Dr Jerome Charmet and Dr George Despotou will deliver on 20/01/2021 the public lecture series in WMG.

Jerome will be giving an overview of his current activities, concentrating on two precision oncology projects. Jerome has worked with a company and clinicians to develop two devices that can simplify cancer management and in particular immunotherapies.

George will present his lecture on "The digital health transformation: at the crossroads of science, engineering and medicine.": Healthcare has experienced a profound transformation. This has been made possible by numerous applications that change the way one will interact with the healthcare system. Knowledge from biology, engineering, computer science, medicine, as well as knowledge from multiple domains such as aerospace and automotive, is brought together in digital health. This results in building safe, effective and efficient patient-centric services and empowering the patient to manage their daily care. The presentation gives an overview by examples, of digital health as the crossroads multiple disciplines.

To find out more about the lecture series have a look at the following link

https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/wmg/mediacentre/wmgevents/assocproflectureseries


WMG in 2020: Day 9 - IDH's achievements in VR and Physiotherapy

Back in March we shared this exciting story thanks to our colleagues at the Institute of Digital Healthcare, WMG. The advent of consumer virtual reality technology combined with 3D motion capture allows real movements to be accurately translated onto an avatar that can be viewed in a virtual environment. Our Researchers investigated whether this technology can be used to provide guidance to physiotherapy patients, by providing a virtual physiotherapist in the home to demonstrate the prescribed exercises.

  • Current Physiotherapy techniques require patients to complete exercises at home, which doesn’t include much guidance.
  • Virtual reality (VR) combined with 3D Motion capture could allow movements to be translated onto an avatar the patient can follow, thanks to researchers at WMG.
  • Consumer VR technologies can be used for both providing guidance to physiotherapy exercises, but also to make the exercises more interesting and encourage people to complete the course they need Virtual reality could help physiotherapy patients complete their exercises at home successfully thanks to researchers at WMG, University of Warwick, who managed to combine VR technology with 3D motion capture.

Risk factors for mortality in diabetic patients discharged from hospital identified

- Patients with diabetes are at a higher risk of mortality when discharged from hospital

- Procedures to discharge patients are in place, but researchers from the University of Warwick have decided to identify risk factors from a number of scientific papers

- The systemic review identified 48 risk factors, from age to BMI to multiple conditions, which should be considered when discharging diabetic patients

When patients are discharged from Hospital those with diabetes are at an increased risk of readmission and mortality, there are guidelines for discharging patients with diabetes to reduce these risks, however researchers from the Institute of Digital Healthcare at WMG, University of Warwick and Warwick Medical School have identified known risk factors for mortality in adult patients discharged from hospital with diabetes.

In the paper, A Systematic Review Considering Risk factors for Mortality of Patients Discharged from Hospital with a Diagnosis of Diabetes’, published in the Journal of Diabetes and its Complications, researchers identified 35 studies that considered the risk factors relating to mortality for patients discharged from hospital with diabetes, they analysed these studies and identified 48 significant risk factors for mortality.


Older news