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WMG in 2020: Day 9 - IDH's achievements in VR and Physiotherapy

Back in March we shared this exciting story thanks to our colleagues at the Institute of Digital Healthcare, WMG. The advent of consumer virtual reality technology combined with 3D motion capture allows real movements to be accurately translated onto an avatar that can be viewed in a virtual environment. Our Researchers investigated whether this technology can be used to provide guidance to physiotherapy patients, by providing a virtual physiotherapist in the home to demonstrate the prescribed exercises.

  • Current Physiotherapy techniques require patients to complete exercises at home, which doesn’t include much guidance.
  • Virtual reality (VR) combined with 3D Motion capture could allow movements to be translated onto an avatar the patient can follow, thanks to researchers at WMG.
  • Consumer VR technologies can be used for both providing guidance to physiotherapy exercises, but also to make the exercises more interesting and encourage people to complete the course they need Virtual reality could help physiotherapy patients complete their exercises at home successfully thanks to researchers at WMG, University of Warwick, who managed to combine VR technology with 3D motion capture.

IDH part of a study showing that people are reluctant to use public defibrillators to treat cardiac arrests

A study led the University of Warwick suggests that people are reluctant to use public access defibrillators to treat cardiac arrests.

Wed 27 Sep 2017, 08:10 | Tags: Digital Health, Theo Arvanitis, Healthcare Technology, Articles

Microsoft’s Xbox Kinect breathes new life into respiratory assessment

Kinect Motion CaptureXbox Kinects could be used in the future to assess the health of patients with conditions such as cystic fibrosis. Normally found in the hands of gamers rather than medics the Microsoft sensors could be used to assess the respiratory function of patients.

Researchers at the Institute of Digital Healthcare, WMG, University of Warwick and the Institute of Inflammation and Ageing, University of Birmingham and Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust (HEFT) have developed a method of using the devices. The system consists of four Kinect sensors which are capable of quickly creating a 3D image of a patient’s torso. This enables physicians to measure and assess how a chest wall moves. In tests it has proven to be as accurate as a patient breathing into a spirometer - the current method used - but providing additional information about the movement of the chest, which could help in identifying numerous respiratory problems.

The project lead, Dr Chris Golby at the Institute of Digital Healthcare, said: “We have developed a low-cost prototype which provides a more comprehensive measurement of a patient’s breathing than existing methods.”

Their work is detailed in their paper Chest Wall motion Analysis in Healthy Volunteers and Adults with Cystic Fibrosis using a Novel Kinect-based Motion Tracking System which is published in Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing.


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