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WMG News

RESOLVE prototypes shape future of electric urban commuting

RESOLVEThe future of daily urban commuting could be small, lightweight Electric L-category Vehicles (ELVs). A cost effective, energy efficient and comfortable alternative to traditional cars in cities, is at the heart of the €6.92m RESOLVE project, which included WMG at the University of Warwick.

The European project – named ‘Range of Electric Solutions for L-category Vehicles’ – designed and developed two stylish tilting four-wheeler prototype ELVs with leading European manufacturers Piaggio and KTM. These demonstrators were unveiled, and presented to representatives from the European Commission, at an event in Brussels in April 2018.

WMG was one of fourteen partners in the project, which included leading names from industry and research such as Piaggio, KTM, Bosch, Ricardo, the Austrian Institute of Technology, and the University of Florence.


WMG joins two new Faraday battery research projects: part of a £42 million UK initiative

Faraday battery researchToday, Tuesday January 23rd 2018, the Faraday Institution announced up to £42 million in new government funding to four UK consortia to conduct research aimed at overcoming battery challenges to accelerate the electric vehicle revolution, and WMG at the University of Warwick will be partners in two of those four new consortia.

The Faraday Institution, which WMG at the University of Warwick helped to form, is the UK’s independent national battery research institute, and it was established as part of the government’s £246 million investment in battery technology through the Government’s Industrial Strategy. Its formation was announced in October 2017 by the Business Secretary Greg Clark. The research it supports at organisations such as WMG at the University of Warwick aims to put the UK on the map as being at the forefront of battery technology worldwide and radically increase the speed with which we are able to make the move to electric vehicles.

Tue 23 January 2018, 11:12 | Tags: Advanced Propulsion Systems David Greenwood Partnerships

WMG researchers at the University of Warwick part of new national £65 million battery research programme

Battery researchWMG researchers, at the University of Warwick, will be a significant part of a new £65 million national battery research initiative. The Faraday Institution, a new multi-million pound research institute, was announced on Monday 2nd October 2017, by Greg Clark, Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. It will drive and accelerate fundamental research in developing battery technologies, and its translation.

The Faraday Institution (FI) will be the UK’s independent, national institute for energy storage research. Funded through the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) from the government’s Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund (ISCF), the Faraday Institution is part of the coordinated activity between UKRI partners Innovate UK and EPSRC with the Advanced Propulsion Centre (APC) to meet the Faraday Battery Challenge, announced by the government in July, of delivering an integrated programme of research, innovation and the scale-up of novel battery technologies.

The UK’s leading battery researchers in academia worked closely with UK industry to assess the challenges and opportunities, and the seven university founders (Cambridge, Imperial, Newcastle, Oxford, Southampton, UCL and Warwick) proposed to charter an independent national Institution as the best way forward. The ambition of the Faraday Institution is to make the UK the go-to place for the research, development, manufacture and production of new electrical storage technologies for both the automotive and the wider relevant sectors.


DELIVER-E: revolutionary electric delivery vehicle tech prototyped by WMG

DELIVER-EA technology demonstrator for a new type of electric delivery vehicle – which could make the courier industry greener and more efficient – has been developed by WMG at the University of Warwick and Warwickshire-based design company Astheimer Ltd.

Based on the platform of a Renault Twizy, the DELIVER-E is a quiet, compact, lightweight electric vehicle, ideal for navigating urban environments, addressing issues like congestion, noise, pollution - and responding to the demands of an ever-growing shift to online shopping. This prototype allows cutting-edge WMG research outputs to be shown in a real, driveable vehicle.

A number of teams in WMG have worked on the project, including their SME Group who developed the original design, and with the help of one of their partners Astheimer, progressed the design from concept to prototype.

Astheimer developed the WMG concept to create a unique vehicle exterior - by enlarging its rear storage area, giving it space for three online delivery baskets. They also added new body panels to the DELIVER-E, and fitted it with programmable LED pixel strips, which can change colour for brake and indicator lights.


WMG Leads Project To Create £14 million UK Automotive Battery Pack Research Facility

BatteryIt was announced today Wednesday 9th September 2015 that WMG, at the University of Warwick, will lead a £14 million consortium to create a new automotive battery pack manufacturing research centre. The project will help develop the next generation of traction batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. It will combine the best human and automated assembly methods to manufacture battery packs and lay the foundations of a new UK automotive supply chain based around this technology.

 


WMG gains two appointments to EPSRC Strategic Advisory Teams

Prof David Greenwood

We are very pleased to announce that Professor David Greenwood and Dr Kerry Kirwan have been appointed to EPSRC (Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council) Strategic Advisory Teams.

Dr Kerry KirwanProfessor David Greenwood will be serving on the Energy Scientific Advisory Committee and Dr Kerry Kirwan will be serving on the Manufacturing the Future Strategic Advisory Team, representing the EPSRC both nationally and internationally.

Their roles will be to provide Theme Leaders at EPSRC with strategic advice to develop their themes and will cover areas such as policy, training, funding priorities, etc.

Both Professor Greenwood and Dr Kirwan will take up three-year appointments commencing 1st April 2015.

Wed 01 April 2015, 15:04 | Tags: David Greenwood, Kerry Kirwan

Jaguar Land Rover Professorial Chair in Advanced Propulsion Systems for NAIC is appointed

Dave GreenwoodJaguar Land Rover and WMG, at the University of Warwick, have appointed Professor David Greenwood as the Jaguar Land Rover Professorial Chair in Advanced Propulsion Systems for the National Automotive Innovation Centre.

Jaguar Land Rover announced last year that it would invest £1.4m in the new position to lead a world-class team of international researchers to advance new and innovative propulsion systems. Professor Greenwood will take up the position, at WMG, on April 7th.

The new Chair is a key element of a long-term strategic plan at the National Automotive Innovation Centre (NAIC) that will create a new research base that will enhance the UK’s capacity and capability in key areas of automotive research. These systems will be essential to enable the UK automotive industry to embrace and robustly deploy new vehicle technologies and deliver a low carbon future, which will have a major impact on the supply chain and the wider economy.