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Autistic children in Berkshire school to benefit from new Digital Healthcare Apprentice support

DHS apprenticeship with Prior's Court

Prior's Court, a specialist residential school in Berkshire and training and development centre for young people aged between 5-25 who are severely affected by autism, is working with WMG at the University of Warwick to help recruit two specialist Digital Healthcare apprentice staff.

The new Digital Healthcare Apprentices will investigate and evaluate data collected on Prior’s Court pupils to support improvements in the wellbeing and experiences of young people with autism at Prior's Court –and will be part of the first wave of a new, innovative national digital healthcare science workforce, working in health and social care to improve people’s health and wellbeing.

Using ‘Big Data’ mining techniques the apprentices, working under joint supervision by academics and specialist autism practitioners, will be able to sift more than a million data points to identify circumstances which predict particular behaviour patterns. This will in turn enable earlier intervention steps to be taken.

This could make a major difference to their quality of life, minimising incidents and perhaps even enabling a young person at the school to later enter employment where this was may have not been previously possible.

The two new Digital Healthcare Apprentices will provide specialist support to the Foundation and its young people, while also studying towards a Bachelor of Science Undergraduate degree in Digital Healthcare Science with the University of Warwick drawing on the expertise of two departments – WMG and Warwick Medical School.

Prior’s Court Chief Executive Mike Robinson said: “Autism is a complex condition. The fundamental question ‘Why does someone with autism have a good day or a bad day?’ is a difficult one to answer. For the young people at Prior’s Court who are severely affected by autism, often with other complex coexisting conditions, it is almost impossible to answer. We believe that by applying the power of being able to collect and analyse large quantities of data to this problem, we will be able to start to answer the question.

“Our digital platform Prior Insight is capturing thousands of pieces of data on our young people every day but it is the practical application which is key. By working with the University of Warwick and recruiting Digital Healthcare Apprentices we can ensure that data is comprehensively analysed and applied to positively impact the lives of many more people with autism – both at Prior’s Court and in the wider world of autism.”

Professor Ed Peile, of Warwick Medical School, comments:

“On my first visit to Prior’s Court I was inspired by how the team there are constantly striving to help young people with severe autism lead happy and fulfilling lives. I was keen to see their cutting edge project using the digital platform ‘Prior Insight’ and to understand what role future members of the new specialism Digital Healthcare Science could play.

“It was immediately apparent to me that, both in their apprenticeship training and when they graduate, Digital Healthcare Scientists have so much to offer at Prior’s Court, and so much to gain there. Thanks to the investment in data collection at Prior’s Court, there is a huge amount of information about how each young person functions.

“Not only that, but working with other technologies including ‘wearable digital technology’ and using the skills of behavioural science and shared decision-making taught on our innovative ‘fusion science course’ will enable the apprentices to contribute as they learn in the workplace.”

How to apply

Applications for the two new roles close in just two weeks on 30th September 2020. Details on how to apply can be found here

 


Warwick Racing team develop second electric race car during lockdown

Warwick Racing is a team of 30 dedicated members all working towards getting a single-seater electric race car designed, manufactured and tested in the space of a year. The team consists of students from multiple departments including the School of Engineering, Warwick Business School and the Department of Computer Science, with the help and facilities of WMG.

The team usually spend their summer in the workshop building a race car. The Covid-19 lockdown hasn’t stopped them from designing and virtually validating their second electric competition car, WRe2.

Warwick Racing renderThe design of WRe2 was started by the 4th year team in October last year who completed development of the powertrain, suspension and chassis. Over the last few months this work has ramped up, continually improving the designs.

As a team first, the bespoke powertrain has not one, but two rear electric motors. The idea of two motors is to allow better control when deploying power in race conditions.

The Control Systems team have been working on developing a traction control system, employing the E400 Automotive Motor Controller under guidance kindly provided by Embed. The framework was developed in Simulink with future expansion kept in mind. Specifics of the vehicle powertrain, suspension configurations and tyre models were considered to achieve the fastest acceleration possible whilst effectively managing rear tyre slip.

Meanwhile, the workshop has very recently opened so students have started preparing the car that they’ll eventually see doing 0-60mph in 4.5 seconds. This has a power to weight ratio of around 300hp/tonne comes very close to the ratios seen in Formula E racing!

Rens Bossers, the chief powertrain engineer for the coming year says:

“WRe2 is a level up for Warwick Racing. By learning from issues found during the build of WRe1, our first electric car, the design is very resilient. As reliability is historically a very significant factor, WRe2 puts us in great stead for a very competitive finish at our annual competition, FSUK. The dual motor setup is also a massive step towards the 4-wheel drive powertrain that we aim to achieve in the near future.

“It is great that we have had the support of several major sponsors such as Catapult, Ford and RS Components – their support has got us to where we are and enables us to continually come up with new, innovative designs.”

However the design and validation of the new vehicle isn’t all the team have been up to, they’ve also been able to virtually race their current vehicle, WRe1, in the FSUK 2020 Virtual Challenge.

Sixty-six teams participated in the event, with the Warwick Racing team managing to get into the final for cost, finishing in 5th place. In their business presentation the team finished in 7th place.

As a first for this year, the dynamic events included wheel to wheel sim racing. Despite having little preparation time, the team finished in 10th place overall, with their best performance being 3rd place in an individual race out of 34 competing teams.

Iqra Hamid, Chief Powertrain Engineer for the 2019/20 season who oversaw the development of both vehicles, comments:

Warwick Racing Car"I've always had a passion for engineering and all things motorsport so being involved with Warwick Racing over the past 4 years has been an amazing experience! The team have come a long way in such a short space of time with the development of WRe1 and now WRe2.

“Whilst we weren't able to showcase our performance live on the track this year, I'm proud of how well the team came together to make the most of the situation during lockdown, achieving some of our best results to date in the virtual Formula Student competition.

“As the team now enters the new season, I'm looking forward to watching the team continue to build upon this success and achieve even better results at FSUK 2021!"

The entire car is built using funds from sponsors – without their generous support the project would not be possible. With thanks to WMG, Catapult HVM, Ford, Embed, Zuken, Vector, Emrax, Demon Tweeks, Loctite, RS, Colt, Igus, Lohmann Technologies, Aquajet, IMI, GRM, ST Motorsport, B-G Racing, Race Parts, AIM, OBP, Powerflex and the many other supporters of the project.

ENDS

10 SEPTEMBER 2020

NOTES TO EDITORS

High-res images available to view at: https://warwick.ac.uk/services/communications/medialibrary/images/september_2020/warwick_racing_render.jpg

Caption: A render of WRe2 spaceframe.

Credit: Warwick Racing, University of Warwick

https://warwick.ac.uk/services/communications/medialibrary/images/september_2020/warwick_racing_car.jpg

Caption: Wre1 on track
Credit: Warwick Racing, University of Warwick

Thu 10 Sep 2020, 12:55 | Tags: STEM Undergraduate Partnerships

Warwick Moto’s electric superbike build racing ahead despite lockdown

Warwick Moto Team (picture taken before the pandemic)Warwick Moto team, consisting of 25 Warwick students aren’t letting the pandemic get in the way of designing, building and developing the electric superbike, as they’re doing it virtually from home.

It was hoped that the Warwick Moto team would see their electric superbike Aurora race this summer with racer Tom Weeden racing it for them. Although plans are on hold due to the current pandemic, students have tried to make the most of their time during lockdown by carrying out virtual meetings to progress on the project as a whole.

Meeting online, the 25 students from a range of Departments including: WMG, School of Engineering, Computer Science, Physics and Maths have redesigned a vital part of the superbike chassis, the subframe.The Warwick Moto Team meeting virtually

The subframe is an integral part of the motorcycle geometry, therefore, has an impact on handling characteristics of the superbike by defining the seating position of the rider. The subframe for Aurora will also package a critical powertrain component, the inverter for the 3-phase 150 kW (200 bhp) electric motor along with some low voltage components.

The team utilised previously gathered data from the strip, measure and weigh activities performed in November 2019 before lockdown, with the help of the metrology team at WMG. This exercise enabled them to define the necessary constraints for the position of the subframe. They have managed to make it 1.5kg lighter than a stock Honda Fireblade subframe and roughly 300g than a racing one. It’s made using carbon fibre and aluminium parts as opposed to just aluminium, reducing weight and increasing the overall stiffness.

Nesta Ferguson and Aneesh Jois, two first year School of Engineering students, have led the design and engineering cycle behind the subframe while discussing ideas, constraints and risks with the rest of the team through online meetings.

Aman Surana, a School of Engineering student and the Chief Engineer for the Warwick Moto team comments:

“We wanted to make the most out of lockdown and try to use this setback as an opportunity to enhance the bike instead. The team’s design intent was to create something simple, easy to assemble and the ability to be built off-site.

“The current global situation demands for concepts that can be built while maintaining social distancing, this new design helps us achieve that as it can be put together by a single person. As a result, we can utilise workshop time for other critical activities.

“We believe this concept could be used by other racing enthusiasts, as it’s made using stock carbon fibre tubes cut to size and bonded to aluminium joining nodes, where the contact surfaces have been sanded to increase bond strength and area. Moreover, it has the potential to be used on other parts of the superbike at a much lower cost than traditional composite only components.”

Having spent the last 3 months to continuously come up with various load-cases to simulate and optimise the subframe structure, the team have used techniques such as shape optimisation to minimise the amount of material used.

The team are still hoping to be able to test the bike in winter, as a competition between University teams is still hoping to take place early next year, however their long-termAurora objective is to compete with a podium qualifying time at the Isle of Man TT 2022.

Rock West Composites are donating the raw material required for this concept along with advice to improve things like bond strength from their years of experience with composites. Xometry Europe have supported the team by providing on-demand manufacturing services that have enabled the manufacture of the joining nodes. The team will be able to assemble this concept off-site with the support of Rock West Composites and Xometry Europe.

Significant support from industrial partners such as High Value Manufacturing (HVM) Catapult team at WMG, MUPO Race Suspension, Michelin Tyre PLC, DYMAG Performance Wheels, MIVOLT, Demon Tweeks, SITRAmoto and Rajputana Custom Motorcycles have immensely helped the team, for which they would like to thank them all for.

To support the team making their first electric bike, you can sponsor them or donate to them here: https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/warwickmoto

Follow their journey:

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/warwick.moto/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/warwickmotoracing/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/warwick-moto/

ENDS

5 AUGUST 2020

NOTES TO EDITORS

Video of the team during lockdown available to view at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLyj7fzbIw0&feature=youtu.be

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Alice Scott
Media Relations Manager – Science
University of Warwick
Tel: +44 (0) 7920531221
E-mail: alice.j.scott@warwick.ac.uk

Wed 05 Aug 2020, 11:04 | Tags: STEM Undergraduate Partnerships

Inspiring the next generation of apprentices

Degree Apprenticeship Insight DayThis week, as part of National Apprenticeship Week 2020, WMG welcomed 38 local students and staff to a Degree Apprenticeship Insight Day.

The primary focus of the day was to help students learn more about Degree Apprenticeships and explore digital health, technology and engineering career paths.

The event included a range of practical workshops and demos including engine stripping in WMG’s engineering hall, an introduction to programming and electric circuits as well as finding out about airflow over an aeroplane using a wind tunnel. Existing apprentices also gave a short talk on their apprenticeship journey and some of the exciting projects they are working on.

Rebecca Archer, Business Engagement and Student Destinations Manager, at the WMG Academy for Young Engineers Solihull, said:

“An excellent and insightful event to give a fantastic introduction to Degree Apprenticeships in the digital health, technology and engineering sectors.”Degree Apprenticeship Insight Day 2

Steve Maggs, WMG’s Director of Undergraduate Programmes added:

“I’d encourage teachers, parents and students to attend more Degree Apprenticeship events to understand what engineering, technology and healthcare careers are available, and research how diverse, varied and stimulating studying and working in these area can be.”

WMG will be hosting further events of this kind to raise awareness of STEM career paths and Degree Apprenticeship programmes.


WMG and Birmingham Hospitals launch new degree for new NHS role

WMG at the University of Warwick has launched an exciting new fusion science degree, accredited by the National School of Healthcare Science as part of Health Education England, and is designed specifically to train people for a brand new, and first of its kind health role within the NHS - Digital Healthcare Scientist.

The BSc degree, which has been developed in partnership with University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Trust, will be open as both a full-time undergraduate course, and a Degree Apprenticeship.

Graduating students will be eligible to apply for membership of the Academy for Healthcare Sciences under the new heading of Digital Healthcare Science. This represents the formation of a new healthcare professional and a new branch within the Academy, the first for many years.

The course has been designed with the aim of augmenting the existing workforce in the NHS and breaking down silos, adopting a fusion science approach: taking into consideration aspects of digital science, academic and professional development, clinical decision making, physiological science and behavioural science. Students will learn in an integrated way, applying knowledge, and ensuring that no subject is taught in isolation from any other.

Four fusion sciences: Behavioural Science, Healthcare and Physiological Sciences, Digital Healthcare, and Shared Clinical Decision-making, will be interwoven throughout the programme giving students a breadth of scientific training.

Professor Ed Peile, from the University of Warwick comments:

“Rarely do patients and health service users have a single problem. They have multiple, often complex, problems affecting their health and wellbeing. Thus, the help they need is not confined to a single discipline. They need broad, holistic, scientific professionalism.

“The ‘Fusion Science’ approach developed here is specifically designed to ensure that the new Digital Healthcare Science workforce can meet these needs”.

Tim Jones, Executive Director of Workforce & Innovation at University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Trust comments:

“This is an exciting new degree which will help us train people for a significant new role in the NHS. University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Trust is also offering six full-time undergraduate students the opportunity for a paid summer vacation placement at the end of the first year of study.”

Berne Ferry, Head of the National School of Healthcare Science, adds:

“The National School of Healthcare Science has been closely involved in initiatives to develop a health workforce fit for the digital future. This includes the use of digital technologies and computer science in all areas of healthcare from artificial intelligence and bioinformatics to patient-focused apps and devices. We are delighted to see universities such as Warwick working quickly and responsively with the health service to develop exciting new programmes to meet these needs.”

The programme would suit students who are interested in medical and healthcare sciences, life sciences, data sciences or psychology. For more information on where to apply please call +44 (0) 2476 525724

ENDS

11 JUNE 2019

NOTES TO EDITORS

The programme would suit students who are interested in medical and healthcare sciences, life sciences, data sciences or psychology. For more information on where to apply please call +44 (0) 2476 525724

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Alice Scott
Media Relations Manager – Science
University of Warwick
Tel: +44 (0) 2476 574 255 or +44 (0) 7920 531 221
E-mail: alice.j.scott@warwick.ac.uk

Tue 11 Jun 2019, 09:03 | Tags: Undergraduate Education IDH

Record number of students join WMG

WMG StudentsA record number of almost 1450 students have enrolled at WMG this academic year.

A huge 1,241 people from 63 countries, are now studying full-time, with a further 27 studying part-time, on one of our 15 Management, Business or sector specific Master’s courses.

96 students have enrolled on our part-time Applied Engineering Programme, studying for a BEng degree alongside their full-time job in the engineering or technology industry. Another 11 have enrolled on our Postgraduate Engineering Degree Apprenticeship Programme.

We have welcomed our largest single intake of Research Degree students across various programmes, including seven EngDs, 24 PhDs and six MSc by Research and the first intake onto our new MSc by Research in Business Transformation.

We’ve also welcomed our first cohort of 23 full-time BSc Cyber Security students.

You can find out more about all of our education programmes here.


WMG submarine team UK champions at international race

Students from WMG at the University of Warwick, who designed and built a submarine, were the UK champions at the 2017 International Submarine Race (ISR) in Washington DC, USA.

godiva 3

The human-powered submarine – Godiva 3 – achieved the fastest times and won more awards than any UK team in the competition, scooping the ‘Best Use of Composites’ and the ‘Best Design Outline’ awards.

Godiva 3 also achieved third place internationally in its class for speed, reaching 2.52 knots.

The Warwick Submarine team is made up of seven Engineering students from a variety of disciplines across the University.

The team has access to world-class engineering expertise and facilities from both WMG and the School of Engineering - both academic departments at the University of Warwick.

Over the past few months, the team has gone from developing an original concept for the submarine to constructing its parts, conducting thorough analyses, working with sponsors, and now taking part in a major global competition.

During the ISR, the team had to deliver a presentation to the panel of judges, submit a design report of their submarine, and race it in time trials on a 100 metre underwater course.

Fri 21 Jul 2017, 15:05 | Tags: Undergraduate Education

New engineering degree developed between WMG and Dyson

AEPA bespoke engineering degree has been developed by WMG, at the University of Warwick, and Dyson which is designed for aspiring engineers.

The four-year degree programme will be delivered at the newly launched Dyson Institute of Technology which is based at Dyson’s Research and Development Campus in Malmesbury Wiltshire. The first cohort of 25 students will start in September 2017.

Professor Lord Bhattacharyya, Chairman and founder of WMG, University of Warwick said: “It is vital that in order for UK companies to be competitive they must have the right people with the right skills. I am delighted we are working with the Dyson Institute on this degree and welcome the move by James Dyson to develop a pool of talent which have the skills that are required to work in industry today.”

Fri 04 Nov 2016, 09:36 | Tags: Undergraduate Education Partnerships

Warwick Submarine scoops prize at European competition

Godiva 2A submarine designed and built by engineering students at the University of Warwick has brought home a prize from a European racing competition.

The Warwick Submarine team won ‘Best Design Report’, when they raced their human-powered submarine Godiva 2 against other university teams at the European International Submarine Race (eISR) at QinetiQ’s Ocean Basin facility in Gosport, Hampshire in July.

The Warwick Sub Project consists of a team of six undergraduate engineering students from a variety of disciplines. The team has access to cutting edge engineering research from both WMG and the School of Engineering, both academic departments at the University of Warwick.

Wed 03 Aug 2016, 13:34 | Tags: Undergraduate Education

From teenage school student to doctoral researcher, WMG’s ‘Class of 2016’ to share their year of learning online

Lord BhattacharyyaWMG at the University of Warwick has launched the ‘Class of 2016’, an exciting new initiative to showcase its world class education programmes, and the opportunities they offer people at any stage of their career.

WMG’s Chairman, Professor Lord Bhattacharyya, is passionate about education and ensuring that industry has the right skills base on which to sustain its future.

He explains: ‘I started out as an apprentice, and it is that grounding that has shaped my whole career. I worked my way up through the ranks, so I know first-hand what it takes to work hard to achieve career goals. I feel strongly that everyone, at any stage of their career, should have the opportunity to develop their skills, which is why workplace learning and technical education is at the very core of WMG.”


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