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Liquid biopsy

Liquid biopsy

Improve population health and wellbeing through minimally-invasive diagnosis. Liquid biopsy that relies on the capture and detection of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in blood, is a minimally invasive approach for cancer diagnosis and monitoring. However, current solutions do not combine high specificity, high sensitivity and high throughput. In collaboration with Bofu Biomedical Ltd (China), the team of WMG, in collaboration with Warwick Medical School, have developed a novel low cost/high throughput liquid biopsy approach.

Date
Tuesday, 01 January 2019

Early detection of prostate cancer

Early detection of prostate cancer

Improve population health and wellbeing through early cancer diagnosis. Development of a low-cost, high-resolution biosensor for the early detection of prostate cancer.

Improving public and workplace wellbeing using digital health technologies

Improving public and workplace wellbeing using digital health technologies

We are investigating how self-monitoring of activity and other physiology using wearable and smartphone devices can impact on public health and further, be used in workplace wellbeing programmes. We work closely with innovative technology companies in this sector, developing and validating algorithms and investigating outcomes following engagement with the programmes. Our work with Sweatcoin, an app that converts step-count into virtual currency, has led the development of new algorithms and findings that show the incentives are engaging individuals who are currently less active and classed as overweight.

Total Hip Arthroplasty Optimisation

Total Hip Arthroplasty Optimisation

Research teams at WMG’s Institute of Digital Healthcare and Centre for Imaging, Metrology and Advanced Technologies are working in collaboration with Corin Group and University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Foundation to Trust to develop new motion capture devices that will optimise implant positioning in total hip replacement surgery. Patients who have pelvises that rotate large amounts during movement are at higher risk of dislocation, particularly if the replacement hip is not fitted accurately. Those patients can receive a more advanced surgical plan, but it is currently difficult to identify who requires this without a number of time consuming and expensive x-rays. This project has resulted in the development of a pelvic motion tracking device that allows surgeons to immediately identify patients who have high levels of pelvic rotation and can therefore receive the additional surgical planning procedure. The project has been funded by grants from Corin Group and WMG High Value Manufacturing Catapult.

Using technology to improve physiotherapy and rehabilitation outcomes

Using technology to improve physiotherapy and rehabilitation outcomes

Currently movement assessment and guidance post-operation is limited to clinic appointments. Outside the clinic, patients are typically provided with a leaflet stating the exercises to be completed. There is no further guidance or feedback available. In IDH, we are investigating the use of consumer technologies to provide guidance and feedback during periods of physiotherapy. Our PhD students are investigating the use of virtual partners using virtual and augmented realities to provide exercise guidance. They are further investigating the use of smartphone sensors to provide continuous assessment of movement and identify periods of movement compensation (due to pain or constraints in movement).

Wearable sensors for healthy living

Wearable sensors for healthy living

The project is focused on improving population health and wellbeing through wearable devices working with Nanoflex. Bringing together a team of experts in sensors integration, electronics, design and batteries (in collaboration with experts in hydrogels, and electrochemical assays for the sensors functionalisation) to develop a wearable device to measure metabolites in sweat based around Nanoflex’s electrode. The team developed a dedicated printed circuit board with a potentiostat and Bluetooth module, tested a range of batteries for mobile applications, designed a device based on user feedback, and produced prototypes for their evaluation in real-life situations.