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Research Fellow

Dr Emma Langley

CEDAR
University of Warwick
Coventry
CV4 7AL

Email: e dot langley dot 1 at warwick dot ac dot uk

Room WE149 New Education Building

 

Research

I returned to CEDAR in 2019 as a Research Fellow following the completion of a PhD in Education and Psychology at the Centre in 2018. My research explores the psychological wellbeing of family members of children with Intellectual Disability (ID) and/or autism which is underpinned by a Family Systems perspective that considers the wellbeing of all family members and how each member influences one another. As part of my doctoral studies I analysed large-scale primary and secondary data to explore questions about family functioning, parental relationship satisfaction, and the outcomes of fathers and single mothers. I am currently working on a postdoctoral fellowship project funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) which focuses on the wellbeing of fathers of children with ID and/or autism.

My other research interests include: the identity and sexuality of disabled young people; the role of the early years practitioner in identifying and supporting children with SEN/D; and the transition and inclusion of children with ID and/or autism in mainstream school settings.

 

Teaching

Prior to joining CEDAR I was as a Teaching Fellow at the Centre for Lifelong learning at Warwick on the Early Childhood and 2+2 and Part-time undergraduate degrees, convening modules on developmental psychology, special education needs, and inclusion. I was the module lead for second year research methods training and have supervised a range of final year dissertations. I currently teach and supervise on the MA Psychology and Education degree at the Centre for Education Studies (CES).

 

Publications

Langley, E., Totsika, V., Hastings, R.P., Bailey, T. (upcoming) Family relationships and their associations in mothers of children with Intellectual Disability (ID). American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.  


Hastings, R.P., Totsika, V., Hayden, N.K., Murray, C.A., Jess, M., Langley, E., Margetson, J. K. (2020). 1000 families study, a UK multiwave cohort investigating the well-being of children with intellectual disabilities: cohort profile. BMJ Open, 10, 1-10. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-032919


Langley, E., Totsika, V., Hastings, R.P. (2019). The psychological wellbeing of fathers with and without a child with Intellectual Disability (ID): A population-based study. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research. doi.org/10.1111/jir.12692

 

Hayden, N.K., Hastings, R.P., Totsika, V., & Langley, E. (2019). A population-based study of the behavioural and emotional adjustment of older siblings of children with and without Intellectual Disability. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 47, 1409-1419. DOI:10.1007/s10802-018-00510-5.

 

Toft, A., Franklin, A., & Langley, E. (2019a). ‘You're not sure that you are gay yet’: The perpetuation of the ‘phase’ in the lives of young disabled LGBT+ people. Sexualities, DOI: 10.1177/1363460719842135.

 

Toft, A., Franklin, A., & Langley, E. (2019b). Young disabled and LGBT+: negotiating identity. Journal of LGBT Youth, 16, 157-172. DOI: 10.1080/19361653.2018.1544532.

 

Langley, E., Totsika, V., & Hastings, R.P. (2017). Parental relationship satisfaction in families of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A multilevel analysis. Autism Research, 10, 1259-1268. DOI: 10.1002/aur.1773.