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EC993: Public Policy in Developing Countries

  • Isleide Zissimos

    Module Leader
  • Atisha Ghosh

    Module Lecturer
18 CATS - Department of Economics
Spring Module

Principal Aims

The purpose of this module is to investigate the Government role in the process of economic development. We will use theoretical tools and empirical evidence to explore how tax policy, social programmes and the provision of public goods and services may improve welfare of nations, particularly that of the less developed countries. Examples of topics included in the module are tax compliance, conditional cash transfer programmes, and corruption.

Principal Learning Outcomes

Subject Knowledge and Understanding:...discuss critically key public policies implemented in developing countries in the last three decades (aims and impacts of the policies) and draw lessons regarding best practices. The teaching and learning methods that enable students to achieve this learning outcome are: The lectures will cover a variety of public policy examples and research evaluating the impact of these policies. The summative assessment methods that measure the achievement of this learning outcome are: Essay, Referee Report and Final exam

Cognitive skills:...evaluate existing work, including journal articles, policy documents and media reports on macroeconomic policy topics. The teaching and learning methods that enable students to achieve this learning outcome are: The lectures will encourage discussion and evaluation of strengths and weaknesses of academic, policy (World Development Reports) and journalistic (recent articles from the Economist) work. The summative assessment methods that measure the achievement of this learning outcome are: Essay, Referee Report and Final exam.

Key Skills:...discuss and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of academic, policy (World Development Reports) and journalistic (recent articles from the Economist) work. The teaching and learning methods that enable students to achieve this learning outcome are: The lectures will introduce students to the reports of the IMF and the World Bank and the use of the World Bank’s online databases. The summative assessment methods that measure the achievement of this learning outcome are: Essay, Referee Report and Final exam.

Subject Knowledge and Understanding:...have a good overview of issues which are relevant for public-policy making in developing countries. The teaching and learning methods that enable students to achieve this learning outcome are: The lectures will discuss important topics in public policy in developing countries. In all cases theoretical argument, empirical evidence and elements of political economy will be discussed to shed light on the topic. The reading list will enable students to dig deeper on some topics and develop their own thinking. The summative assessment methods that measure the achievement of this learning outcome are: Essay, Referee Report and final exam.

Syllabus

The syllabus may cover, but is not limited to, the following areas:

• Taxation and development in the long run

• Tax structure and tax evasion

• Optimal taxation

• Corruption

• Redistribution and targeting

• Public goods and externalities

• Public sector management

Context

Optional Module
L1P6 - Year 1, L1P7 - Year 1
Pre or Co-requisites
Students should have completed courses in intermediate level microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics.

Assessment

Assessment Method
Coursework (50%) + 2 hour examination (May) (50%)
Coursework Details
Assessment 1 (Essay) (40%) , Assessment 1 (Referee Report) (10%) , 2 hour examination (May) (50%)
Exam Timing
N/A

Exam Rubric

Time Allowed: 2 Hours

Read all instructions carefully- and read through the entire paper at least once before you start entering your answers.

There are TWO Sections in this paper. Answer THREE questions in Section A (20 marks each) and ONE question in Section B (40 marks).

Approved pocket calculators are allowed.

You should not submit answers to more than the required number of questions. If you do, we will mark the questions in the order that they appear, up to the required number of questions in each section.

Previous exam papers can be found in the University’s past papers archive. Please note that previous exam papers may not have operated under the same exam rubric or assessment weightings as those for the current academic year. The content of past papers may also be different.

Reading Lists