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PAIS in the News

PAIS in the News is the place to find all the latest information on any recently-published media featuring members of the PAIS faculty, research fellows, and doctoral candidates.


PAIS once again ranked 1st in The Times/Sunday Times Good University Guide

We are delighted to announce that the Department of Politics and International Studies (PAIS) is ranked 1st of 84 UK Politics departments in The Times/The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2020. This influential national league table reflects latest data, including student satisfaction (NSS), research excellence, and graduate prospects.

The University of Warwick is ranked 10th overall.

Professor Nick Vaughan-Williams, Head of PAIS, commented:

“Students and staff in PAIS will be justifiably proud that, for the second year in a row, the Department has been ranked 1st among UK Politics Departments in The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2020. This wonderful result underscores that our twinned commitment to viewing students as partners in our education strategy and as beneficiaries of our long-standing research excellence is a winning formula for sustained success. With a renewed focus in 19/20 on employability, internationalisation, widening participation, and equality and diversity – featuring initiatives to deepen our EU partnerships, further liberate the curriculum, and enhance the student voice – this latest league table success is a terrific start to the new academic year. Over the coming weeks my colleagues and I look forward to welcoming all new and returning students to the Department and to driving forward these agendas together.”

Dr Justin Greaves, Director of Student Experience and Progression, commented:

“This outstanding result is testament to all the brilliant students and staff in PAIS. This league table shows how we are a leader, both within the Russell Group and the sector as a whole, in terms of student experience and teaching quality. It is particularly pleasing to see our results have increased yet further in these categories. I look forward to working with all our incoming and returning students to ensure that the PAIS department goes from strength to strength, combining intellectual stretch and rigour with the highest possible levels of academic support.”

We thank all staff and students who have contributed to this outstanding achievement. With a number of exciting and ambitious plans for the 2019/20 academic year and beyond, we look forward to sustaining and building on these successes in the months and years ahead.

Mon 23 Sep 2019, 11:52 | Tags: Front Staff PhD MA UG Faculty of Social Sciences

Annual IPE Debate: 'Climate Change: Power, Resistance & Change'

This year's Annual IPE Debate will be on 'Climate Change: Power, Resistance & Change', and will feature Professor Peter Newell (Sussex); Dr Marie Claire Brisbois (SPRU); and Dr Caroline Kuzemko (Warwick). It will take place on Wednesday, 4th March, 2020 from 15:00-16:30 in H0.52.

It will be followed by a short drinks reception. All welcome.

Wed 27 Nov 2019, 13:59 | Tags: Front, Staff, PhD, MA, UG, International Political Economy, Research

Annual IPE Lecture: Juanita Elias

Professor Juanita Elias, University of Warwick, will be giving the Annual IPE Lecture on: 'Women on board: The gender politics of economic competitiveness'.

The lecture will take place on 22nd January, from 15:00-16:30 in L5 (Sciences Concourse). There will be a short drinks reception afterwards. All welcome.

Fri 22 Nov 2019, 11:50 | Tags: Front, Staff, PhD, MA, UG, International Political Economy, Research

Former PAIS student wins dissertation prize

Nastia van der Meer, BA (Hons) History and Politics, 2019, has won the Undergraduate Dissertation Prize competition of the Council for British Research in the Levant – for best UG dissertation on the Levant in 2019.

Nastia's dissertation, supervised by Nicola Pratt, compared the non-violent resistance methods used by indigenous populations to resist settler colonial oppression in the contexts of Apartheid South Africa and modern-day Israel-Palestine. The assessors found the dissertation to be “highly original and cutting edge with a sophisticated approach”. Congratulations to Nastia!

Thu 14 Nov 2019, 10:20 | Tags: Front, Staff, UG

East Asia Study Group Special Seminar by Prof. Richard Samuels (MIT) on Japanese intelligence community

We are delighted to invite Professor Richard Samuels, Ford International Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for International Studies at MIT, as a special guest speaker for our East Asia Study Group (EASG) seminar.

Professor Samuels will discuss the evolution of Japan’s intelligence community and its future, based on his 6th book from Cornell University Press, Special Duty: A history of the Japanese Intelligence Community (published in October 2019). He is one of the very most distinguished international experts on Japanese politics. Professors Chris Hughes, Richard Aldrich, and Chris Moran will be hosting this talk. Although this event is out of term time, we are very fortunate to have Professor Samuels visit, and really hope you can make the effort to attend. A private book signing will take place immediately after the talk. If you plan to attend this seminar, please email easg@warwick.ac.uk.

Further details below:

Title: Special Duty: A History of the Japanese Intelligence Community

Time: 17 December 2019, 15:00-17:00

Venue: Council Chamber, Senate House

Abstract:

Intelligence communities are everywhere and always in motion. Japan's has been no exception, often shifting in response to dramatic analytical and organisational failures, changes in the regional and global balance, and sudden technological developments. In the first half of the 20th century, Japan had a full spectrum intelligence apparatus. This came apart with defeat in WWII and subordination to the United States. After the Cold War, shifts in the security environment and major intelligence failures stimulated rethinking by Tokyo. Following a period of half-hearted and incomplete reforms, the Japanese government began to enhance its collection and analysis capabilities, and to tackle in earnest the dysfunctional stovepipes and leak-prone practices hampering its intelligence system. Where do matters stand today?

Fri 01 Nov 2019, 13:51 | Tags: Front, Staff, PhD, MA, UG, Comparative Politics and Democratisation

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