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Programme of Events 2018-19


 
Tue 9 Oct, '18
-
CRPLA Seminar: Michael Dillon, 'Making Infinity Count: The Baroque Order of Transfinite Things and the Automatisation of Reason'
S0.11

More details to follow.

Wed 17 Oct, '18
-
Postgraduate Work in Progress Seminar: Chenwei Nie
OC1.07

Title: 'When is a Person/Cognitive System Immune to Delusions?'

Discussion will be followed by Q+A at The Dirty Duck.

Wed 17 Oct, '18
-
CRPLA/History of Art Seminar: Bence Nanay (Antwerp)
IAS Seminar Room, Millburn House, History of Art Department

Title: 'Global Aesthetics'

Tue 23 Oct, '18
-
CRPLA Seminar: Karen Simecek, '‘Listen to me!' The Value of Voice in Performed Poetry’
S0.11
Wed 31 Oct, '18
-
Postgraduate Work in Progress Seminar: Chenwei Nie
OC1.07

Title: 'When is a Person/Cognitive System Immune to Delusions?'

Discussion will be followed by Q+A at The Dirty Duck.

Tue 20 Nov, '18
-
CRPLA Seminar: Douglas Pye, ‘V.F. Perkins, E.H. Gombrich and Criteria’ (full title below)
S0.11

Full title: ‘“… I have become less and less convinced that criticism does or should proceed through the use of anything that can reasonably be described as criteria”: V.F. Perkins, E.H. Gombrich and Criteria’

Wed 21 Nov, '18
-
Postgraduate Work in Progress Seminar
OC1.07
Tue 4 Dec, '18
-
CRPLA Seminar: Philippe Lynes, ‘Blanchot’s role in Derrida's Life Death’. Respondent: Holly Langstaff
S0.11

Details to follow.

Wed 5 Dec, '18
-
Postgraduate Work in Progress Seminar
OC1.07
Tue 15 Jan, '19
-
CRPLA Seminar: Tina Lupton, ‘Queer Times for the Straight Book: Ali Smith, Maggie Nelson, Michel Serres’
S0.11
Wed 23 Jan, '19
-
Philosophy Department Post-Graduate Work in Progress Seminar: Simon Wimmer - 'Knowledge as a Factual Attitude'
Room S0.28, Social Sciences Building

Simon Wimmer will present his paper on 'Knowledge as a Factual Attitude',

Abstract:

This paper introduces a puzzle concerning knowledge and belief and argues that to resolve the puzzle we should reject the orthodox claim that knowledge is a propositional attitude. To bolster the case for my response to the puzzle, I argue that the most prominent alternative proposal, due to Jeff King and Wataru Uegaki, fails to resolve the puzzle because it relies on a false conception of the relationship between acquaintance and so-called 'propositional' knowledge. I close by suggesting that my response to the puzzle has important consequences for epistemology and philosophy of Mind; it undermines the widespread project of understanding the nature of knowledge in terms of belief and casts doubt on a recent response to Jackson's knowledge argument by Tim Crane.

Tue 29 Jan, '19
-
CRPLA Seminar: Adam Frank, ‘Hollow Utterance or Expression: Austin with Stein’. Respondent: Daniel Katz
S0.11

Details to follow.

Wed 6 Feb, '19
-
Postgraduate Work in Progress Seminar: Sydney Harvey
Room S.028, Social Sciences Building

Title: 'Angst and the Ticking Bomb Under the Table'

Wed 20 Feb, '19
-
Philosophy Department Postgraduate Work in Progress Seminar: Mert Yirmibes: 'Hegel's Treatment of Modality as Against the Modal Sceptical Approaches'
Room S.028, Social Sciences Building

Abstract:

In this talk Mert will examine two interpretations of Hegel in relation to the contemporary modal metaphysics. Firstly, Robert Brandom puts forward modal expressivism and modal realism in order to overcome modal scepticism. He places Hegelian term determinateness in the centre of his theories, as a non-modal explanatory tool, which makes explicit the implicit modal connotations in the empirical vocabulary. Brandom suggests considering Hegel on the same line with Lewis and Stalnaker whose approaches to modality require non-modal explanatory tools to define modal concepts, such as possible worlds for Lewis and propositions for Stalnaker. Secondly, Paul Redding proposes that since Hegel defines actuality as consisting possibility within itself, Hegel's position in modal metaphysics may be well taken similar to Stalnaker's vision of modal actualism, which defines possibilities as sets of consistent propositions contained within actuality. Mert argues that these two interpretations, reconciling Hegel with Lewis and Stalnaker, miss to illuminate Hegel's distinctive approach to modality, namely, the immanent derivation of modal concepts. By examining the formal elements of Hegel's treatment of modality, Mert demonstrates that Hegel's immanent critique of modality is capable of overcoming sceptical worries by deriving modal concepts from one to another without a need of modally unexplainable tools.

Tue 26 Feb, '19
-
CRPLA Seminar: Olga Smith, ‘Landscape without a subject: representing environment in contemporary photography’. Respondent: Karen Lang
S0.11
Wed 27 Feb, '19
-
Postgraduate Work in Progress Seminar: Simon Gansinger
Room S.028, Social Sciences Building

Title: 'Reasoning with Leviathan: On the Political Ontology of Human Rights'

Response: Emily Bassett

Tue 12 Mar, '19
-
CRPLA Seminar: David Fearn, ‘Gorgias’ Cosmos: Classical Greek Sophistic Rhetoric as Exemplificatory Poetics’
S0.11
Wed 13 Mar, '19
-
Postgraduate Work in Progress Seminar: Maria Giovanna Corrado

Title: 'A Puzzle About the Nature of Auditory Perceptual Experience'

ABSTRACT:

We commonsensically take it that one of the functions of perception is to enable one to enter in cognitive contact with a variety of elements populating one’s environment, including events in which ordinary material objects participate. The case of auditory perception poses a unique challenge to accommodate this function. A set of phenomenological considerations, which seem to suggest that we undergo acousmatic experiences of sounds divorced from the material events that might count as their sources, raises the question as to how awareness of sounds enables cognitive contact with ordinary material objects in the world. One approach to addressing this question, found in the literature, is to define the ontological relation between sounds and events in which ordinary material objects participate and, consequently, to derive an account of the content of auditory perceptual experience. In this talk, I will put forward a different reading of the question which is not satisfied by this approach. I will argue that there is a puzzle about the nature of auditory perceptual experience which purports to show that sounds sufficiently determine the auditory perceptual experiences we undergo and exclude events in which objects participate from playing a role. After providing some motivation for the puzzle and addressing some worries, I will conclude by pointing to the direction of my solution to the puzzle.

 

Thu 4 Apr, '19
Precarity and Precariousness Workshop

Workshop supported by CRPLA and HRC at Warwick and by Royal Holloway

Sat 4 May, '19
-
Poetry and Philosophy Colloquium: On Poetic Determination
MS.05
Wed 8 May, '19
-
PG Work in Progress Seminar
Room S2.77 (Cowling Room)

Speaker: Chris Noonan

Thu 9 May, '19
-
CRPLA Seminar: Andrew Benjamin - ‘Doubt and Indifference: Threshold Conditions in Rosso Fiorentino and Bartolomeo Neroni’ (new title)
MS.05
Wed 22 May, '19
-
PG Work in Progress Seminar
Room S2.77, Cowling Room

Speaker: Brigid Evans

Wed 29 May, '19
-
PG Work in Progress Seminar
Room S2.77, Cowling Room

Speaker: Michele Giavazzi

Wed 19 Jun, '19
-
PG Work in Progress Seminar
Room S2.77, Cowling Room

Speaker: Ahilleas Rokni

Wed 26 Jun, '19
-
PG Work in Progress Seminar
Room S2.77, Cowling Room

Speaker: Matt Chennells