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Programme of Events 2020-21


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Tue 13 Oct, '20
-
CRPLA Reading Group: Philosophy in a Time of Crisis
Wed 14 Oct, '20
-
Biopolitics Reading Group II
Webinar

Introduction: Biopolitics After Foucault

Led by Daniele Lorenzini

Wed 21 Oct, '20
-
Biopolitics Reading Group II
Webinar

Biopolitics and the Corona Virus: Tim Christiaens (Ku Leuven)

Tue 27 Oct, '20
-
CRPLA Reading Group: Philosophy in a Time of Crisis
Wed 4 Nov, '20
-
Biopolitics Reading Group II
Webinar

Death in Biopolitics: Ege Selin Islekel (Fordham University)

Tue 24 Nov, '20
-
CRPLA Reading Group: Philosophy in a Time of Crisis
Wed 25 Nov, '20
-
Biopolitics Reading Group II
Webinar

Biopolitics and the Changing Use of Statistics: Laurence Barry (Hebrew University, Jerusalem)

Tue 8 Dec, '20
-
CRPLA Reading Group: Philosophy in a Time of Crisis
Fri 15 Jan, '21
-
Race and Philosophy Reading Group
Tue 19 Jan, '21
-
Early Chinese Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

The study of Chinese thought in the West has often been mired with misinterpretation. The causes of this misunderstanding range from simple lack of knowledge and accurate translations to blatant ethnocentrism. This reading group proposes to study early Chinese thinkers on their own terms, without imposing Western concepts on them. It is our goal to create a space of exchange and learning that will enable all to join and get something from it. Therefore, everyone is welcome. No previous knowledge of Chinese thought and languages is required, as we will use English translations of the classics. It will however be one of the goals of the reading group to develop an awareness of the particular meaning of certain Chinese terms, so as to not lose too much in translation.
 
This term, we will be reading the Daodejing 道德經, "The Classic of the Way and Virtue". There are far too many translations, and of too varying outlooks (and quality), to unquestionably recommend any one of them. D.C Lau's 1963 "Tao Te Ching" and Roger T. Ames & David L. Hall's 2003 "Dao de jing: a philosophical translation" are both good starting points, but crossing sources will be very important to grasp all the complexity of this often obscure text.

Everybody welcome! Please contact Thadee Chantry-Gellens for further information.

Wed 20 Jan, '21
-
Biopolitics Reading Group
MS Teams

'Biopolitics and Deconstruction'

Guest Speaker: Naomi Waltham-Smith (Warwick)

Fri 22 Jan, '21
-
Race and Philosophy Reading Group
Fri 22 Jan, '21
-
The Moral and Political Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

his group will focus on reading key Moral and Political philosophical texts. This year we are reading Hegel's Philosophy of Right published in 1821. This work has been described by Stephen Houlgate as 'one of the greatest works of social and political philosophy ever written.' The book traces the true realization of freedom and free will via Hegel's immanent process of dialectics. Arguably, this book is still pertinent and relevant for our times: not only does it acknowledge that freedom can be enhanced by economic opportunities, but, moreover, it recognizes that unregulated capitalism is a cause of alienation, inequality and poverty.

Everybody welcome! Please contact Andrew Paull to receive further information and a link to participate.

Tue 26 Jan, '21
-
Early Chinese Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

The study of Chinese thought in the West has often been mired with misinterpretation. The causes of this misunderstanding range from simple lack of knowledge and accurate translations to blatant ethnocentrism. This reading group proposes to study early Chinese thinkers on their own terms, without imposing Western concepts on them. It is our goal to create a space of exchange and learning that will enable all to join and get something from it. Therefore, everyone is welcome. No previous knowledge of Chinese thought and languages is required, as we will use English translations of the classics. It will however be one of the goals of the reading group to develop an awareness of the particular meaning of certain Chinese terms, so as to not lose too much in translation.
 
This term, we will be reading the Daodejing 道德經, "The Classic of the Way and Virtue". There are far too many translations, and of too varying outlooks (and quality), to unquestionably recommend any one of them. D.C Lau's 1963 "Tao Te Ching" and Roger T. Ames & David L. Hall's 2003 "Dao de jing: a philosophical translation" are both good starting points, but crossing sources will be very important to grasp all the complexity of this often obscure text.

Everybody welcome! Please contact Thadee Chantry-Gellens for further information.

Tue 26 Jan, '21
-
CRPLA/Habitability GRP Seminar: Mark Bould (UWE), 'The Anthropocene Unconscious: Climate Catastrophe Culture'
Fri 29 Jan, '21
-
Race and Philosophy Reading Group
Fri 29 Jan, '21
-
The Moral and Political Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

his group will focus on reading key Moral and Political philosophical texts. This year we are reading Hegel's Philosophy of Right published in 1821. This work has been described by Stephen Houlgate as 'one of the greatest works of social and political philosophy ever written.' The book traces the true realization of freedom and free will via Hegel's immanent process of dialectics. Arguably, this book is still pertinent and relevant for our times: not only does it acknowledge that freedom can be enhanced by economic opportunities, but, moreover, it recognizes that unregulated capitalism is a cause of alienation, inequality and poverty.

Everybody welcome! Please contact Andrew Paull for further information and to receive a link to participate.

Tue 2 Feb, '21
-
Early Chinese Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

The study of Chinese thought in the West has often been mired with misinterpretation. The causes of this misunderstanding range from simple lack of knowledge and accurate translations to blatant ethnocentrism. This reading group proposes to study early Chinese thinkers on their own terms, without imposing Western concepts on them. It is our goal to create a space of exchange and learning that will enable all to join and get something from it. Therefore, everyone is welcome. No previous knowledge of Chinese thought and languages is required, as we will use English translations of the classics. It will however be one of the goals of the reading group to develop an awareness of the particular meaning of certain Chinese terms, so as to not lose too much in translation.
 
This term, we will be reading the Daodejing 道德經, "The Classic of the Way and Virtue". There are far too many translations, and of too varying outlooks (and quality), to unquestionably recommend any one of them. D.C Lau's 1963 "Tao Te Ching" and Roger T. Ames & David L. Hall's 2003 "Dao de jing: a philosophical translation" are both good starting points, but crossing sources will be very important to grasp all the complexity of this often obscure text.

Everybody welcome! Please contact Thadee Chantry-Gellens for further information.

Tue 2 Feb, '21
-
CRPLA Seminar on Art and the Digital: Eleen Deprez and Shelby Moser
Wed 3 Feb, '21
-
Biopolitics Reading Group
MS Teams

'Transgressive Resistance and Biopolitics'

Guest Speaker: Guilel Treiber (KU Leuven)

Fri 5 Feb, '21
-
Race and Philosophy Reading Group
Fri 5 Feb, '21
-
The Moral and Political Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

his group will focus on reading key Moral and Political philosophical texts. This year we are reading Hegel's Philosophy of Right published in 1821. This work has been described by Stephen Houlgate as 'one of the greatest works of social and political philosophy ever written.' The book traces the true realization of freedom and free will via Hegel's immanent process of dialectics. Arguably, this book is still pertinent and relevant for our times: not only does it acknowledge that freedom can be enhanced by economic opportunities, but, moreover, it recognizes that unregulated capitalism is a cause of alienation, inequality and poverty.

Everybody welcome! Please contact Andrew Paull for further information.

Mon 8 Feb, '21
-
Art and Mind Reading Group
MS Teams

Subject: Censorship

Tue 9 Feb, '21
-
Early Chinese Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

The study of Chinese thought in the West has often been mired with misinterpretation. The causes of this misunderstanding range from simple lack of knowledge and accurate translations to blatant ethnocentrism. This reading group proposes to study early Chinese thinkers on their own terms, without imposing Western concepts on them. It is our goal to create a space of exchange and learning that will enable all to join and get something from it. Therefore, everyone is welcome. No previous knowledge of Chinese thought and languages is required, as we will use English translations of the classics. It will however be one of the goals of the reading group to develop an awareness of the particular meaning of certain Chinese terms, so as to not lose too much in translation.
 
This term, we will be reading the Daodejing 道德經, "The Classic of the Way and Virtue". There are far too many translations, and of too varying outlooks (and quality), to unquestionably recommend any one of them. D.C Lau's 1963 "Tao Te Ching" and Roger T. Ames & David L. Hall's 2003 "Dao de jing: a philosophical translation" are both good starting points, but crossing sources will be very important to grasp all the complexity of this often obscure text.

Everybody welcome! Please contact Thadee Chantry-Gellens for further information.

Fri 12 Feb, '21
-
Race and Philosophy Reading Group
Fri 12 Feb, '21
-
The Moral and Political Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

his group will focus on reading key Moral and Political philosophical texts. This year we are reading Hegel's Philosophy of Right published in 1821. This work has been described by Stephen Houlgate as 'one of the greatest works of social and political philosophy ever written.' The book traces the true realization of freedom and free will via Hegel's immanent process of dialectics. Arguably, this book is still pertinent and relevant for our times: not only does it acknowledge that freedom can be enhanced by economic opportunities, but, moreover, it recognizes that unregulated capitalism is a cause of alienation, inequality and poverty.

Everybody welcome! Please contact Andrew Paull for further information.

Tue 16 Feb, '21
-
Early Chinese Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

The study of Chinese thought in the West has often been mired with misinterpretation. The causes of this misunderstanding range from simple lack of knowledge and accurate translations to blatant ethnocentrism. This reading group proposes to study early Chinese thinkers on their own terms, without imposing Western concepts on them. It is our goal to create a space of exchange and learning that will enable all to join and get something from it. Therefore, everyone is welcome. No previous knowledge of Chinese thought and languages is required, as we will use English translations of the classics. It will however be one of the goals of the reading group to develop an awareness of the particular meaning of certain Chinese terms, so as to not lose too much in translation.
 
This term, we will be reading the Daodejing 道德經, "The Classic of the Way and Virtue". There are far too many translations, and of too varying outlooks (and quality), to unquestionably recommend any one of them. D.C Lau's 1963 "Tao Te Ching" and Roger T. Ames & David L. Hall's 2003 "Dao de jing: a philosophical translation" are both good starting points, but crossing sources will be very important to grasp all the complexity of this often obscure text.

Everybody welcome! Please contact Thadee Chantry-Gellens for further information.

Fri 19 Feb, '21
-
Race and Philosophy Reading Group
Fri 19 Feb, '21
-
The Moral and Political Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

his group will focus on reading key Moral and Political philosophical texts. This year we are reading Hegel's Philosophy of Right published in 1821. This work has been described by Stephen Houlgate as 'one of the greatest works of social and political philosophy ever written.' The book traces the true realization of freedom and free will via Hegel's immanent process of dialectics. Arguably, this book is still pertinent and relevant for our times: not only does it acknowledge that freedom can be enhanced by economic opportunities, but, moreover, it recognizes that unregulated capitalism is a cause of alienation, inequality and poverty.

Everybody welcome! Please contact Andrew Paull for further information.

Mon 22 Feb, '21
-
Art and Mind Reading Group
MS Teams

Subject: Art Criticism