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Programme of Events 2020-21


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Thu 3 Dec, '20
-
Art and Mind Reading Group
MS Teams

Subject: Literature

Please contact Giulia Lorenzi for further information.

Tue 8 Dec, '20
-
CELPA Seminar Series Term 1
Webinar

Guest Speaker: Rahul Kumar (Queen's)

Tue 8 Dec, '20
-
CRPLA Reading Group: Philosophy in a Time of Crisis
Wed 9 Dec, '20
-
Postgraduate Study at The University of Warwick: Information Session

This event is an information session geared towards undergraduates who may be interested in further study, or just curious to learn more. Please contact Dr Thomas Crowther for further information.

Thu 10 Dec, '20
-
MAP Cinema Club
MS Teams

The Film Club will be discussing the short documentary 30% (Women and Politics in Sierra Leone) and exploring the themes of gender and social collaboration. To be added to the dedicated mailing list and MS Team group and receive further information, please send an email to Sailee (organiser) via sailee.khurjekar@warwick.ac.uk.

Thu 10 Dec, '20
-
Knowledge and Belief Seminar
By Zoom

Guest Speaker: Guy Longworth (Warwick)

Title: 'Unsettling Questions'

Abstract: "Should we expect someone who knows by seeing to be in a position positively to settle the questions “How do you know?” “Why do you think so?” or “Are you sure?"? I begin to address that large question by defending the following claims. We should not expect someone who knows by seeing that p to be in a position to know how they know that p (§2). However, we should expect someone who knows by seeing that p to have sufficient reasons for thinking that p, but—in light of the first claim—we should not expect their seeing what they do to figure amongst their reasons. A further issue that will figure in the background to the discussion here concerns how, if at all, sensory awareness of things can furnish one with reasons for thinking things so (§3). Despite the fact that one who knows by seeing need not know how they know and need not have amongst their reasons that they see what they do, still their seeing what they do can play an important role in establishing surety (§4)."

Fri 11 Dec, '20
-
MAP Online Q&A Session for Undergraduate Students
MS Teams

Please contact Giulia Lorenzi for further information.

Mon 14 Dec, '20
-
4th Birmingham-Nottingham-Warwick Joint Graduate Conference
By Zoom

Further details to follow.

Wed 16 Dec, '20
-
Philosophy Department Staff Christmas Social Event
MS Teams
Thu 7 Jan, '21
-
Beyond The Punitive Society
Webinar

A joint session of 'Abolition 13/13' with Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought

Contributors:

Miguel de Beistegui

Claire Blencowe

Henrique Carvalho

Stuart Elden

Daniele Lorenzini

Goldie Osuri

Irene Dal Poz

Federico Testa

Bernard E Harcourt

Thu 14 Jan, '21
-
From Moral Learning to Self-Understanding Seminar Series
Webinar

Guest Speaker: Kristina Musholt (Leipzig)

Tue 19 Jan, '21
-
Early Chinese Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

The study of Chinese thought in the West has often been mired with misinterpretation. The causes of this misunderstanding range from simple lack of knowledge and accurate translations to blatant ethnocentrism. This reading group proposes to study early Chinese thinkers on their own terms, without imposing Western concepts on them. It is our goal to create a space of exchange and learning that will enable all to join and get something from it. Therefore, everyone is welcome. No previous knowledge of Chinese thought and languages is required, as we will use English translations of the classics. It will however be one of the goals of the reading group to develop an awareness of the particular meaning of certain Chinese terms, so as to not lose too much in translation.
 
This term, we will be reading the Daodejing 道德經, "The Classic of the Way and Virtue". There are far too many translations, and of too varying outlooks (and quality), to unquestionably recommend any one of them. D.C Lau's 1963 "Tao Te Ching" and Roger T. Ames & David L. Hall's 2003 "Dao de jing: a philosophical translation" are both good starting points, but crossing sources will be very important to grasp all the complexity of this often obscure text.

Everybody welcome! Please contact Thadee Chantry-Gellens for further information.

Tue 19 Jan, '21
-
Warwick Post-Kantian European Seminar
Webinar

Speaker: Manon Garcia (Harvard Society of Fellows)

Title: 'Masculinity as an Impasse: Beauvoir's Understanding of Men's Situation in The Second Sex'

Wed 20 Jan, '21
-
Philosophy Department Meeting
MS Teams
Wed 20 Jan, '21
-
Biopolitics Reading Group
MS Teams

'Biopolitics and Deconstruction'

Guest Speaker: Naomi Waltham-Smith (Warwick)

Thu 21 Jan, '21
-
Postgraduate Work in Progress Seminar
MS Teams

Please contact Johan Heemskerk for further information (j.heemskerk@warwick.ac.uk)

Fri 22 Jan, '21
-
The Moral and Political Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

his group will focus on reading key Moral and Political philosophical texts. This year we are reading Hegel's Philosophy of Right published in 1821. This work has been described by Stephen Houlgate as 'one of the greatest works of social and political philosophy ever written.' The book traces the true realization of freedom and free will via Hegel's immanent process of dialectics. Arguably, this book is still pertinent and relevant for our times: not only does it acknowledge that freedom can be enhanced by economic opportunities, but, moreover, it recognizes that unregulated capitalism is a cause of alienation, inequality and poverty.

Everybody welcome! Please contact Andrew Paull to receive further information and a link to participate.

Tue 26 Jan, '21
-
Early Chinese Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

The study of Chinese thought in the West has often been mired with misinterpretation. The causes of this misunderstanding range from simple lack of knowledge and accurate translations to blatant ethnocentrism. This reading group proposes to study early Chinese thinkers on their own terms, without imposing Western concepts on them. It is our goal to create a space of exchange and learning that will enable all to join and get something from it. Therefore, everyone is welcome. No previous knowledge of Chinese thought and languages is required, as we will use English translations of the classics. It will however be one of the goals of the reading group to develop an awareness of the particular meaning of certain Chinese terms, so as to not lose too much in translation.
 
This term, we will be reading the Daodejing 道德經, "The Classic of the Way and Virtue". There are far too many translations, and of too varying outlooks (and quality), to unquestionably recommend any one of them. D.C Lau's 1963 "Tao Te Ching" and Roger T. Ames & David L. Hall's 2003 "Dao de jing: a philosophical translation" are both good starting points, but crossing sources will be very important to grasp all the complexity of this often obscure text.

Everybody welcome! Please contact Thadee Chantry-Gellens for further information.

Tue 26 Jan, '21
-
CRPLA/Habitability GRP Seminar: Mark Bould (UWE), 'The Anthropocene Unconscious: Climate Catastrophe Culture'
Wed 27 Jan, '21
-
Philosophy Department Colloquium
Webinar

Guest Speaker: Andy Hamilton (Durham)

Title: 'Art for Art's Sake: Aestheticising Engaged Art and Philistinism'

Thu 28 Jan, '21
-
MAP Cinema Club

We will be discussing the documentary film Paris Is Burning and the themes of drag and sexuality in America. To be added to the dedicated mailing list and MS Team group and receive further information, please send an email to Sailee (organiser) via sailee.khurjekar@warwick.ac.uk.

Thu 28 Jan, '21
-
From Moral Learning to Self-Understanding Seminar Series
Webinar

Guest Speaker: Edward Harcourt (Oxford)

Fri 29 Jan, '21
-
The Moral and Political Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

his group will focus on reading key Moral and Political philosophical texts. This year we are reading Hegel's Philosophy of Right published in 1821. This work has been described by Stephen Houlgate as 'one of the greatest works of social and political philosophy ever written.' The book traces the true realization of freedom and free will via Hegel's immanent process of dialectics. Arguably, this book is still pertinent and relevant for our times: not only does it acknowledge that freedom can be enhanced by economic opportunities, but, moreover, it recognizes that unregulated capitalism is a cause of alienation, inequality and poverty.

Everybody welcome! Please contact Andrew Paull for further information and to receive a link to participate.

Sat 30 Jan, '21
-
Philosophy Department Open Day (Campus)
Tue 2 Feb, '21
-
Early Chinese Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

The study of Chinese thought in the West has often been mired with misinterpretation. The causes of this misunderstanding range from simple lack of knowledge and accurate translations to blatant ethnocentrism. This reading group proposes to study early Chinese thinkers on their own terms, without imposing Western concepts on them. It is our goal to create a space of exchange and learning that will enable all to join and get something from it. Therefore, everyone is welcome. No previous knowledge of Chinese thought and languages is required, as we will use English translations of the classics. It will however be one of the goals of the reading group to develop an awareness of the particular meaning of certain Chinese terms, so as to not lose too much in translation.
 
This term, we will be reading the Daodejing 道德經, "The Classic of the Way and Virtue". There are far too many translations, and of too varying outlooks (and quality), to unquestionably recommend any one of them. D.C Lau's 1963 "Tao Te Ching" and Roger T. Ames & David L. Hall's 2003 "Dao de jing: a philosophical translation" are both good starting points, but crossing sources will be very important to grasp all the complexity of this often obscure text.

Everybody welcome! Please contact Thadee Chantry-Gellens for further information.

Tue 2 Feb, '21
-
CRPLA Seminar on Art and the Digital: Eleen Deprez and Shelby Moser
Wed 3 Feb, '21
-
MAP Seminar Series - Term 2
MS Teams

'Disability, Mental Health and Inclusion'

Facilitator: Eileen John

Please contact Giulia Lorenzi for further information (giulia.lorenzi@warwick.ac.uk)

Wed 3 Feb, '21
-
Philosophy Department Balloon Debate
MS Teams

You are warmly invited to our next Philosophy Balloon Debate. What is a balloon debate, you ask? Some philosophical folk are trapped on a sinking hot air balloon. To stay afloat, they need to drop weight. Staff and students from Philosophy will answer questions to determine who stays and who goes. Featuring:

Barney Walker on David Hume

David James on Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Guy Longworth on Gottlob Frege

Diarmuid Costello on Marcel Duchamp (WILD CARD)

Jae Hetterley on Edith Stein (PGR)

Toby Tremlett on Simone de Beauvoir (UG)

This is a Philosophy community event co-organised with PhilSoc. Everyone is welcome – UGs, PGTs, PGRs, and all staff. Please contact David Bather Woods for further information.

Wed 3 Feb, '21
-
Biopolitics Reading Group
MS Teams

'Transgressive Resistance and Biopolitics'

Guest Speaker: Guilel Treiber (KU Leuven)

Fri 5 Feb, '21
-
The Moral and Political Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

his group will focus on reading key Moral and Political philosophical texts. This year we are reading Hegel's Philosophy of Right published in 1821. This work has been described by Stephen Houlgate as 'one of the greatest works of social and political philosophy ever written.' The book traces the true realization of freedom and free will via Hegel's immanent process of dialectics. Arguably, this book is still pertinent and relevant for our times: not only does it acknowledge that freedom can be enhanced by economic opportunities, but, moreover, it recognizes that unregulated capitalism is a cause of alienation, inequality and poverty.

Everybody welcome! Please contact Andrew Paull for further information.