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Events

Our forthcoming events are listed below.

You can find information about our past events here (2016 - present) and here (2000 - 2015).

For videos and podcasts of past CSWG events, click here.

 

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Wed 27 Jan, '16
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CSWG Graduate Seminar: "Cultural representations with a gender perspective: Narratives, emotions and experience"
S0.08
Mon 1 Feb, '16
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Annual Lecture: Prof. Wendy Hollway - "Becoming a mother, gender and feminism"
S0.19 (Social Sciences Building)

 

hollwayYou are warmly invited to this year's CSWG Annual Lecture. The lecture is open to all and will be followed by a reception.

Speaker: Prof. Wendy Hollway (Open University)

Discussant: Dr. Julie Walsh (University of Warwick)

 

Becoming a mother, gender and feminism

The period of becoming a mother is a fundamental issue for feminism and a challenging one for the transdisciplinary study of women and gender, involving experiences that are hard to access through available language and discourses. How we understand, theorise and represent the perinatal period of mothering reaches into questions of gender equality and gender difference, parenting and how we treat women's reproductive bodies and the biological. To explore these themes, my talk draws on a piece of empirical research about becoming a mother for the first time, using Bracha Ettinger’s matrixial theory to point beyond the binaries in accounts of women’s reproductive capacities, parental care and gender equality.


WENDY HOLLWAY is Emeritus Professor in Psychology at the Open University. She is interested in applying psychoanalytic principles to theorising subjectivity, to methodology and to empirical research on identity, especially with reference to gender. Her ESRC-funded research on the transition to a maternal identity uses both free association narrative interview and psychoanalytic observation methods. Her most recent book is ‘Knowing Mothers: Researching Maternal Identity Change’, 2015, Palgrave.

 

A summary and discussion of the annual lecture can be found in the following post, on the CSWG blog: "The Discomfort of Becoming a Mother", by Yara Richter and Wendy Hollway.

  

Wed 10 Feb, '16
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Graduate Seminar: "Constructing the Contemporary Family"
S0.08
Thu 18 Feb, '16
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Workshop: "How to Get Published"
R3.25

As part of the CSWG Graduate Seminar Series, you are warmly invited to attend a special talk given by Dr Blu Tirohl, Editor-in-Chief at the Journal of Gender Studies, on ‘How to Get Published'.

In this seminar, which will be particularly valuable to PhD students and early career researchers who are planning to publish research on gender, Dr Tirohl will discuss the journal’s aims and objectives, how papers are refereed and managed by the journal, factors that commonly lead to rejection, and tips for getting published. All are welcome and no registration is required.

Further details can be found on the Graduate Seminar Series homepage.

Thu 18 Feb, '16
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Seminar: "Sex work, work and women as workers: beyond definition debates"
R1.13

A seminar on 'Sex work, work and women as workers: beyond definition debates' is being given by JaneMaree Maher from the Centre for Women's Studies and Gender Research (Monash) on Thursday February 18th in R1.13.

The seminar will be followed by wine, soft drinks and nibbles.

This event is one of a series of events during JaneMaree's visit to Warwick. All are welcome to attend and there is no need to register.

ABSTRACT

Consistent debates over the validity of defining sex work as work have defined social and regulatory responses and, to some extent, mean that the 'sex' aspect of sex work tends to dominate discussions about work in this diverse industry. In this paper, drawing on a number of recent empirical projects conducted within the School of Social Sciences at Monash University, I focus on women's work practices, and how women negotiate the regulations and conditions of their sex work workplaces. From this data, I argue that women's acounts of their sex work are very often pragmatic, focussed on financial gain and on work/life sustainability. Debates about work or not work are not relevant to women seeking to optimise their time and labours in the sexual services industry. I argue more attention needs to be directed towards women's work rights and opportunities, as women workers themselves are suggesting. Overall, persistent discussions about the status of sex work act as a form of exclusion and stigma that limits positive forms of reulation and rssponse to women's aspirations and objecrives as they work in sex work.

Fri 19 Feb, '16
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Workshop: "Publishing from your PhD - timing and tactics"
IAS seminar room, Milburn House

JaneMaree Maher, Centre for Women's Studies and Gender Research, Monash, is holding a writing workshop entitled: Publishing from your PhD: timing and tactics. This workshop will explore the processes of publishing during doctoral research. Topics covered include: how to identify and target the best journal for your work; how to develop a compelling abstract; how to structure a journal article drawing on sections of your research project; and how to respond effectively to referee reports. This workshop will include opportunities for discussion of student work and case studies of successful publication strategies.

JaneMaree has run the very successful Prato PhD writing workshop for many years.

Contact nickie.charles@warwick.ac.uk to register for the workshop. Places are limited and registration is essential.

Wed 24 Feb, '16
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Seminar: "A Nation of Women: Methodological challenges in Delaware Indian history of colonial encounters and gender"
R2.41


Speaker: Gunlög Fur (Linnaeus University)

Abstract: In the mid-eighteenth century Delaware, or Lenape, Indian people were sometimes referred to in diplomatic negotiations between English colonists and Indian peoples as "a nation of women." This presentation looks at changing ideas of gender and identity among the Delawares from the mid-seventeenth through the eighteenth century as they encountered waves of migrating peoples and colonists into their territory along the eastern coast of North America. I discuss the process of writing a gender history by focusing on the possibilities and limits of colonial archives, the need to apply a gender perspective on historiography, and end with suggesting how Delaware experiences and thinking on gender contributes to the development of theory in history.

Discussants:

  • Meleisa Ono-George (Modern Records Centre)
  • David Lambert (History)

Chair: Laura Schwartz (History)

Co-sponsored by IAS, the Social Theory Centre, the Feminist Theory Reading Group (History) and the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender

Wed 24 Feb, '16
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Graduate Seminar: "A Gender Agenda: Visual Methods, Masculinities and the Environmental"
S0.08 (Social Sciences Building)
Wed 9 Mar, '16
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Graduate Seminar: "Gender, Representation and Control: International Contexts"
S0.08

You are warmly invited to attend the final CSWG graduate seminar of Spring term, taking place on Wednesday 9th March. This is a fantastic opportunity to encounter and discuss research taking place on a range of gender related topics, and a chance to meet and network with researchers in your field in a friendly and stimulating atmosphere.

This week’s speakers:

 

Bidrea Alnasser (University of Warwick): ‘Issues of representation in narratives about and by Iraqi women’

 

Charlotte Rachael Proudman (University of Cambridge): ‘A legal double standard: Prohibiting female genital mutilation while tolerating female genital cosmetic surgery’

 

DATE: Wednesday 9th March 2016

TIME: 5pm to 6.30pm (followed by a wine reception)

VENUE: S0.08, Social Sciences Building

 

All are welcome and no registration is required. For more information please go to our webpage, or follow the Centre on Twitter via @CSWGWarwick.

Fri 11 Mar, '16
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Workshop: Sexual Harassment and Rape in Universities
S0.11 (Social Sciences Building)

This workshop will include:

3.00 - 4.45: a panel of academics, activists, practitioners and students discussing the issue from different perspectives.

5.00 - 7.30: a screening of The Hunting Ground (2015), a US documentary on the topic (http://www.thehuntinggroundfilm.com/), followed by a Q & A with Amy Ziering, the film's producer.

You are welcome to join us for both, or only one, of these events.

Both events are FREE and OPEN TO ALL, and no registration is required.

Fri 29 Apr, '16
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Workshop: "Actively Researching Gender in India"
IAS seminar room, Milburn House

An early career workshop to which you are warmly invited.

Further information and how to book can be found here

Thu 5 May, '16
Symposium: Twilight People - Trans* and Faith
Radcliffe House

symposium_banner.jpe

You are warmly invited to attend the 'Twilight People' Trans* and Faith Symposium. This symposium is to set a platform for the much needed dialogue across religious/spiritual and LGBTQIA+ communities to meet, share experiences, and discuss trans and non binary gender issues in a faith context.

This event is open to all communities. Participation is free of charge. Capacity is limited and this will be a popular event so do book as early as possible - book your place here.

 
PROGRAMME SNEAK PEEK:
- Sabah Choudrey , Bame/TPOC (‘Inclusivity’ booklet with GIRES)
- Leng Montgomery (Stonewall)
- UK BOOK LAUNCH presented by Sybils
 

A small number of bursaries to cover UK travel for session presenters are available. Please enquire (click).

Thu 5 May, '16
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Performance: "Breathe For Me" by Martin O'Brien
Warwick Arts Centre Studio

Martin O’Brien’s practice focuses on physical endurance and disgust in relation to the fact he suffers from cystic fibrosis. Breathe for Me considers the nature of the regulated chronically ill body. Martin O’Brien re-embodies and takes pleasure in the excessive performance of an already embodied lived experience. Illness is revealed through the body in extremis. This body which is turning against itself relentlessly endures as a form of resistance to illness. Martin is beaten, bruised, cut, and penetrated, exhausted, suffocated, examined and treated in a regime of sufferance in order to survive.

Mon 6 Jun, '16
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Seminar: 'Imagining a Trans* Epistemology: Unlearning Gender Binary Discourse in Education’
C1.11 (Social Sciences Building)

12:30-1pm refreshments
1-2:15pm seminar and discussion

Abstract:

Postsecondary institutions of education, similar to the broader society in which they are embedded, are steeped in – and further – trans* oppression. Additionally, the knowledge produced at these institutions can be seen as inflected with trans* oppression, and as continuing to reify the notion that trans* lives and experiences are abject, abnormal, unintelligible, and otherwise impossible. In this presentation, Dr Nicolazzo builds from the work of Patton (2016), Brayboy (2005), Bernal (2002), Ferguson (2012), and Spade (2015) to propose an epistemology that seeks to “[re]distribute the possibilities, potentialities, and life chances” for trans* people. Dr Nicolazzo will also discuss how the imagining of such a trans* epistemological stance may help educators unlearn the gender binary illogic in which they collude, thereby (re)shaping education as liberatory.

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Z Nicolazzo is Assistant Professor in the Adult and Higher Education programme and a faculty associate in the Center for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality, at Northern Illinois University, US. Z’s book, Trans* in College: Transgender Students’ Strategies for Navigating Campus Life and the Institutional Politics of Inclusion, which details hir 18-month ethnographic research project alongside trans* university students in the United States, is forthcoming from Stylus Publishing (2016). http://cedu.niu.edu/cahe/about/faculty/z-nicolazzo.shtml

This seminar is free and open to all, but advanced booking is required for catering purposes. You can book your place here.

Research seminar co-hosted by the Centre for Education Studies (CES) and the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender (CSWG), and supported by the Faculty of Social Sciences.

Wed 8 Jun, '16
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Workshop: "The Politics of Entering, Leaving, and Doing Justice Alongside Marginalized Populations through Fieldwork"
R0.03/04 (Ramphal Building)

Postgraduate and Early-Career Scholar Workshop: "Rethinking “The Field”: The Politics of Entering, Leaving, and Doing Justice Alongside Marginalized Populations through Fieldwork", with Dr Z Nicolazzo

Conceptions of ‘the field’ for qualitative researchers are both ambiguous and contested. During this workshop, Dr Nicolazzo will work alongside participants to explore the tensions between the practical dimensions of doing research as a practice of creating knowledge, and the affective dimensions of research, which stem from critical qualitative researchers' intrinsic values for relation, connection, friendship, love, advocacy, and equity. Dr Nicolazzo will share insights ze gleaned from hir 18-month critical collaborative ethnographic study with trans* university students, and will engage workshop participants in thinking about how they as researchers make sense of, interact within, and negotiate ‘entering’ and ‘leaving’ the ‘field’, especially in relation to researching alongside marginalized populations. Participants will work with Dr Nicolazzo to think through their own research in an attempt to address some of the challenges that surface throughout the session.

 

This session is open to all MA and PhD students and early career scholars (across all disciplines, and including colleagues from other universities). Attendance is free and lunch is provided, but you must register in advance here.

 

The workshop will take place from 10.30 to 12.30, and lunch will be served from 12.30. You are also very welcome to stay on for the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender "(Not Very Far) Away Day", which will take place in the same room immediately after lunch.

 

If you have any questions about this workshop, please email Dr Emily F. Henderson (E.Henderson@warwick.ac.uk).
 

Biographical information: Dr. Z Nicolazzo is Assistant Professor in the Adult and Higher Education programme and a faculty associate in the Center for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality, at Northern Illinois University, US. Z gained hir PhD in Student Affairs in Higher Education, with a graduate certificate in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, from Miami University in 2015, before taking up the post at NIU. Z’s research agenda is focused on mapping gender across higher education contexts, with particular attention to trans* students, as well as the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and disability. Z’s book, Trans* in College: Transgender Students’ Strategies for Navigating Campus Life and the Institutional Politics of Inclusion, which details hir 18-month ethnographic research project alongside trans* university students in the United States, is forthcoming from Stylus Publishing (2016). http://cedu.niu.edu/cahe/about/faculty/z-nicolazzo.shtml

 

This workshop is co-organised by the Centre for Education Studies and the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender, with the support of the Institute of Advanced Study.

Wed 8 Jun, '16
-
CSWG (Not Very Far) Away Day 2016
Ramphal R0.03/04

Are you interested in research and teaching on gender and women? Then join us for the 2016 (Not Very Far) Away Day of the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender!

The (Not Very Far) Away Day provides an opportunity for scholars interested in women and gender from across the University of Warwick to meet and find out about each other's research. In previous years we have made posters about our research, bounced ideas about new research agendas off each other, and discussed activities that we would like the Centre to organise. The NVFAD offers a space for informal conversations about research interests that we have in common and ways of developing new research on women and gender. It also provides a forum for forging creative links across departments and energising those of us working on women and gender.

After very successful editions, for example, in 2007, 2008 and 2010, we are delighted to announce that the NVFAD is returning in 2016! It will be taking place on
June 8th, 2016
from 1.00 - 4.30 (including lunch)
in Ramphal R0.03/04

 
The NVFAD is open to all staff and students at Warwick, from across all faculties and services within the University.
 

The full detailed programme for the NVFAD will be announced nearer the time, but the event will include a discussion session on the current state and future directions of research and teaching on gender at Warwick, a poster exhibition, a publications fair and a networking lunch.

To register for the NVFAD, click here.

Tue 14 Jun, '16
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Book Launch: "Genes and the Bioimaginary" by Deborah L. Steinberg
R1.04

A video recording of this event can be found here.

You are warmly invited to the launch of Deborah Lynn Steinberg's latest book Genes and the Bioimaginary: Science, Spectacle, Culture (Ashgate/Routledge).

Professor Elizabeth Ettorre (Liverpool University) and Professor Stuart Murray (Carleton University, Canada) will be talking about the book and its significance. Deborah will also say a few words.

Wine, soft drinks and refreshments will be served.

poster

Fri 24 Jun, '16
Exhibition "Twilight People: Stories of Faith and Gender Beyond the Binary"
The Pod

twilight people


The Twilight People touring exhibition was launched in February 2016 for LGBT History Month at Islington Museum and is now touring the UK. It will be shown in Coventry from May 4th to June 24th in The Pod.

The theme of the Twilight People exhibition is ‘body and ritual’, covering primarily the time period from the 1980s to today. Physical transformation, religious rituals and religious fetish objects (e.g. hairstyle, accessories, head-gear, jewellery, tattoos) are very often important symbols to mark both faith and gender journeys. Twilight People will capture the voices and images of gender-nonconforming people of faith and interpret them in a heritage context.

Exhibition Details:

The Pod
1A Lamb Street,
CV1 4AE
Coventry

Opening hours: Monday to Thursday - 8.30am to 4.30pm. Friday - 8.30am to 4pm.

For more information on The Pod, see: http://www.coventry.gov.uk/thepod

For more information on the exhibition and the "Twilight People" project, see http://www.facebook.com/events/1681451395440386/ and http://www.twilightpeople.com/exhibition-tour-launches-in-coventry/

Tweet #TPexhibition

Free Admission

Wed 19 Oct, '16
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Seminar: "Crossing gender and postcolonial borders: Academic women on the move"
S2.84 (Social Sciences Building)

Crossing gender and postcolonial borders: Academic women on the move. A reflection on the experiences of Brazilian women in Portuguese academia

Wednesday, October 19th 2016

1.00 – 2.30 pm

S2.84 (Social Sciences Building)

Free and open to all; no registration required

Speaker:

Dr. Thais França (CIES – Lisbon University Institute)

Abstract:

Academic mobility has been presented as a fundamental step in academic career development. Its benefits – transnational networking, knowledge circulation and increase of international publishing – have been largely acclaimed. However, it cannot be disregarded that this phenomenon occurs in a context of the advancement of neoliberal ideas in the academic context. Hence, it is fundamental to analyse the academic through a critical perspective that considers not only its advantages but also its hierarchies and power asymmetries. In order to investigate women’s experience in academic mobility schemes, reflecting on how gender differences shape it, it is important to denounce some of the discrimination and inequalities that are reproduced through academic mobility programs. To accept claims such as “academic women are less mobile than their male colleagues” without considering its causes and its impact on women’s career is to render invisible exclusion dynamics strongly present in academia. Indeed, the different variables and interests present in academic mobility processes demand a complex analysis that goes beyond a single perspective. It is necessary to take in consideration how the various markers of difference interact to shape subjects’ academic mobility experience. The case of Brazilian academics in Portuguese academia is a powerful illustration of how gender, race, nationality and geopolitical hierarchies bound together to legitimate stereotypes and exclusion dynamics.

Chair and Discussant:

Dr. Maria do Mar Pereira (Sociology)

Seminar organised by the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender, in collaboration with AMIN: Academic Mobilities and Immobilities Network

Wed 19 Oct, '16
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Seminar: Graduate Seminar Series
Ramphal R1.15

Re-inscribing women's roles: tales from the city

Attendance is FREE and we welcome students and staff at all levels and from any discipline.

In R1.15, 5pm to 6.30pm followed by a wine reception.

See our Graduate Seminar page for details of this week's speakers.

Thu 20 Oct, '16
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Workshop: "The challenges of researching Academia from the inside"
E1.02 (Social Sciences Building)

You are warmly invited to join us for this exciting WORKSHOP FOR PhD STUDENTS AND EARLY CAREER RESEARCHERS:

The shoemaker's kids always go barefoot: The challenges of researching Academia from the inside

Thursday, October 20th 2016

1.00 – 2.45 pm

E1.02 (Social Sciences Building)

 

Facilitator:

Dr. Thais França (CIES – Lisbon University Institute)

 

Aims of the Workshop:

To conduct an academic research implies taking into account many different variables and scenarios, not only its scientific aspects – theories, objectives, methods and methodologies – but also its ethical and political implications and the institutional aspects and constraints involved. Researching academic topics therefore, may be more challenging and complex than it would seem. In this workshop aimed at PhD students and early career scholars, we will discuss those challenges, drawing both on Thais França’s research on the experiences of migrant women academics, and on participants’ own research projects.

 

TO REGISTER FOR THE WORKSHOP – WHICH IS FREE AND OPEN TO ALL – CLICK HERE

 

Bio:

Thais França is from Brazil but currently works in Portugal as a Post-Doc researcher at CIES-IUL, Portugal. She received her PhD in the Sociology of Work at the University of Coimbra, Portugal, an MA in Work Psychology at the University of Bologna, Italy, under the European Erasmus Mundus Master Program “Work, Organizational, and Personal Psychology” and a Bachelor degree in Psychology at the Federal University of Ceará, Brasil.

Her current research project is about gender and scientific mobility in Europa, analyzing, especially, issues relating to sexism and racism in the Academic environment. This research interest emerges from her own personal experience as a Latin American migrant woman – first in Italy and now in the Portuguese academia – and from what she has experienced and heard from other migrant women researchers.

As feminist studies teaches us, on the one hand the separation between researcher and object is unwarranted, and on the other hand there should be no difference between feminism research and activism. To recognize myself as a “Brazilian immigrant woman”; to implicate my biography in my analysis; to demarcate in my writings a situated position; and to assume a political and ideological commitment with social transformation; are some of the characteristics I attempt to include in all of my work.

Workshop organised by the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender

Wed 26 Oct, '16
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Conference: "Breaking our silences on the neoliberal academy - facilitating change from a postgraduate perspective"
Westwood Campus, WA1.15
Wed 26 Oct, '16
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Seminar: "Doing gendered and classed motherhood: The experiences of academic women in Greece"
S2.77

The Centre for Education Studies, in association with the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender, is pleased to welcome Dr Maria Tsouroufli (University of Wolverhampton) to present:

Doing gendered and classed motherhood: The experiences of academic women in Greece

Feminist scholarship has raised consciousness about the material conditions associated with motherhood and the male-dominated ideology in shaping the social construction of motherhood. Theories of late modernity on the other hand have emphasized liberation from structures and institutions in post-industrial and post-traditional societies, which allow for reflexively creative maternal subjects with endless possibilities and choices. However, the enduring significance of gender and how it intersects with class in the organisation of parenting, domestic, and professional work has been obscured in contemporary post-feminist and neo-liberal contexts. This paper examines how academic women conceptualize, enact and reconfigure motherhood within the patriarchal Greek society, and the classed and gendered strategies they adopt to reconcile ‘good’ motherhood with notions of the ‘good’ doctor/academic professional.

This seminar is co-hosted by the Centre for Education Studies and the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender.


Biography:

Dr Maria Tsouroufli is a Greek-born British scientist with interdisciplinary academic and research experience in education, health and medicine. Her research is at the interface of education, sociology, feminist and organisational studies. Her work in the Sociology of Education has been concerned with the relationship between policy, practice and inequalities, exploring how gender inequalities are connected to professional subjectivities, everyday practices, pedagogy, organisational processes and policy. She joined the Institute of Education, Faculty of Education Health and Well-being at the University of Wolverhampton as a Reader in Education in November 2015.

Wed 2 Nov, '16
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Seminar: Graduate Seminar Series
Ramphal R1.15

Women as workers and consumers: cooking, cockpits and conduct.

Attendance is FREE and we welcome students and staff at all levels and from any discipline.

In R1.15, 5pm to 6.30pm followed by a wine reception.

See our Graduate Seminar page for details of this week's speakers.

Mon 14 Nov, '16
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Public Lecture: Luce Irigaray - "'How Could We Truly Live and Talk Together"
WBS 0.006

'How Could We Truly Live and Talk Together: Beyond Idealist Dreams and Pseudo-materialist Dictates'

Before intending to live together, it would be advisable to wonder whether we are really alive, and how we could become truly living beings in spite of the cultural tradition and the social and political context in which we are situated. We must also wonder about the language that we speak. Does this language contribute toward our becoming living? Or, when we talk to one another, are we merely subjecting ourselves to common codes which prevent us from expressing ourselves as living beings? Furthermore, the basic structure of our logic favours a subject-object adequacy and not a subject-subject connection. In reality, we still lack a logic of intersubjectivity of which we are particularly in need in our time. Some elements in order to elaborate such logic will be suggested and offer to be discussed.

This event is free to attend and all are welcome. You must register here for a ticket.

This event is supported by the Social Theory Centre and the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender at the University of Warwick.

Tue 15 Nov, '16
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Seminar: Luce Irigaray, in Conversation with Stephen Seely
OC1.01
Wed 16 Nov, '16
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Seminar: Graduate Seminar Series
Ramphal R1.15

Incorporating the televisual and theoretical: gender identities in flux

Attendance is FREE and we welcome students and staff at all levels and from any discipline.

In R1.15, 5pm to 6.30pm followed by a wine reception.

See our Graduate Seminar page for details of this week's speakers.

Wed 30 Nov, '16
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Seminar: Graduate Seminar Series
Ramphal R1.15

A cultural exploration: global perspectives of resistance and reflexivity

Attendance is FREE and we welcome students and staff at all levels and from any discipline.

In R1.15, 5pm to 6.30pm followed by a wine reception.

See our Graduate Seminar page for details of this week's speakers.

Wed 11 Jan, '17
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Seminar: Graduate Seminar Series
Ramphal R1.15

Women in and beyond war: justice, conflict and peacekeeping

Attendance is FREE and we welcome students and staff at all levels and from any discipline.

In R1.15, 5pm to 6.30pm followed by a wine reception.

See our Graduate Seminar page for details of this week's speakers.

Wed 25 Jan, '17
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Seminar: Graduate Seminar Series
Ramphal R1.15

Gender and the media: articulating experience and facilitating change

Attendance is FREE and we welcome students and staff at all levels and from any discipline.

In R1.15, 5pm to 6.30pm followed by a wine reception.

See our Graduate Seminar page for details of this week's speakers.

Wed 8 Feb, '17
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Seminar: Graduate Seminar Series
Ramphal R1.15

Families in context: parenting, policies and masculinity

Attendance is FREE and we welcome students and staff at all levels and from any discipline.

In R1.15, 5pm to 6.30pm followed by a wine reception.

See our Graduate Seminar page for details of this week's speakers.

Fri 17 Feb, '17
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Workshop: Certifying Equality? A critical conversation on Athena SWAN and equality accreditation
Wolfson Research Exchange, University of Warwick Library


This event will bring together colleagues who work on creating, supporting and evaluating submissions, with researchers who have been studying Athena SWAN and other equality and diversity monitoring mechanisms.

Attendance is FREE and lunch and refreshments will be provided - but please register in advance here.

poster

Tue 21 Feb, '17
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Screening: "Audre Lorde: The Berlin Years"
H0.43

Are you interested in the work of Audre Lorde, or in black, lesbian, feminist theory, activism and literature?

Then join us for a screening of the documentary Audre Lorde: The Berlin Years.

Audre Lorde - the Berlin Years 1984 to 1992 documents Audre Lorde's influence on the German political and cultural scene during a decade of profound social change, a decade that brought about the fall of the Berlin Wall and the re-unification of East and West Germany. This chronicles an untold chapter of Lorde’s life: her empowerment of Afro-German women, as she challenged white women to acknowledge the significance of their white privilege and to deal with difference in constructive ways. (Read more about the film here: http://www.audrelorde-theberlinyears.com/)

The screening is free and open to all, no reservation required. We will discuss the film after it is screened.

The screening is hosted by the Sociology MA module “Feminist Theory and Epistemology: Debates and Dilemmas”, with the support of the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender.

Wed 22 Feb, '17
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Seminar: Graduate Seminar Series
Ramphal R1.15

Public and private vulnerabilities: homelessness, harassment and technology

Attendance is FREE and we welcome students and staff at all levels and from any discipline.

In R1.15, 5pm to 6.30pm followed by a wine reception.

See our Graduate Seminar page for details of this week's speakers.

Tue 28 Feb, '17
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Workshop: "Gendered Work in Global Food Commodity Chains"

Speakers include Professor Stephanie Barrientos (Manchester), whose research on global value chains and agri-food – including the role of supermarkets – is widely applauded. The event is sponsored by the Global Research Priority on International Development, which has adopted gender as its theme for this year; the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender (CSWG); the network for Connecting Research on Employment and Work (CREW); and the Institute of Advanced Study. It focuses on a topic which encompasses several different networks, and crosses the usual divide between global North and global South.

Tue 28 Feb, '17
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Workshop: "Publishing in Feminist Academic Journals: What (Not) To Do"
Wolfson 1, Wolfson Research Exchange

In this workshop, hosted by the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender (CSWG) and aimed at postgraduate students and emerging researchers, we will explore how to get published in feminist academic journals. We will begin by describing the process of submission and peer review of articles, looking specifically at the distinctive features of those processes within feminist journals. Then, we will identify a set of practical writing and editing tips - what to do and what not to do - which will help participants write richer and stronger articles for feminist journals. The workshop will end with a period of discussion, during which participants can ask questions, clarify their doubts and receive advice on how to choose the feminist journals that best match their area of expertise.

The workshop will be led by Maria do Mar Pereira, Deputy Director of CSWG and co-editor of the journal Feminist Theory.

The workshop is free and open to all PhD students and early career researchers at Warwick.

To participate in the workshop, you must register by using this link: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/sociology/research/centres/gender/archive/workshop

Tue 7 Mar, '17
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Screening: "Hidden Figures"
Warwick Arts Centre Cinema

CSWG Film Club

You are warmly invited to join us for the inaugural event of the CSWG Film Club, a new partnership between CSWG and the Warwick Arts Centre Cinema.

A special screening of the film “Hidden Figures”

with a post-screening discussion

featuring Prof Akwugo Emejulu (Sociology), Kindy Sandhu (Coventry University and Coventry Women’s Voices), Dr Ajay Chandra (Maths), Ivié Itoje (Law; Co-President of WARSoc – Warwick Anti-Racism Society), and more speakers to be confirmed.

(chaired by Maria do Mar Pereira, Deputy Director of CSWG)

Hidden Figures is a 2016 American biographical drama film directed by Theodore Melfi and written by Melfi and Allison Schroeder, based on the non-fiction book of the same name by Margot Lee Shetterly about African American female mathematicians who worked at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) during the Space Race.

This event is open to all, including the general public.

Tickets for the screening cost between £3.50 and £8.00, and can be purchased from the Warwick Arts Centre Box Office in person, or online through the Warwick Arts Centre website.

Wed 8 Mar, '17
-
Conference: "Gendering Academic Mobility: International Perspectives"
IAS Seminar Room
Wed 8 Mar, '17
-
Seminar: Graduate Seminar Series
Ramphal R1.15

Gendered life stages: birth, marriage and middle-age

Attendance is FREE and we welcome students and staff at all levels and from any discipline.

In R1.15, 5pm to 6.30pm followed by a wine reception.

See our Graduate Seminar page for details of this week's speakers.

Tue 6 Jun, '17
-
Roundtable: Feminist Art Perspectives on Architecture and the Domestic Environment
Warwick Arts Centre - National Grid Room

The Mead Gallery is currently showing Room, a free exhibition of installations, sculptures and photographs by international women artists, which variously explore ideas around architecture and the domestic environment – historically perceived as a female sphere of activity. The featured artists include Nan Goldin, Beverly Buchanan, Heidi Bucher, Louise Bourgeois, Klara Lidén, Hilary Lloyd, Sarah Lucas, Marvin Gaye Chetwynd, Rachel Feinstein, Joanna Piotrowska, Penny Slinger, Francesca Woodman, Andra Ursuta, Marianne Vitale and Andrea Zittel.

To celebrate the exhibition, the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender is hosting a roundtable discussion on feminist art approaches to architecture and the domestic environment. Speakers include:

Refreshments will be provided.

The roundtable is free but places are limited and must be booked in advance. You can book a ticket by visiting the Arts Centre Box Office, or calling the Box Office on 024 7652 4524.

The roundtable will be preceded by a free tour of the exhibition led by Laura Lord, the curator. Tickets for this are also limited and can be booked in advance through the Box Office.

Wed 21 Jun, '17
-
Symposium: "Power, Knowledge and Feminism (in Academia and Beyond)"
A0.23

Feminist scholars have been writing about the politics of knowledge production and the contested status of feminist knowledge for a very long time. It is, arguably, one of the oldest topics of debate and activism amongst feminists and other critical scholars. But those old questions remain open and topical, especially at a time of both intense change – of the nature of higher education, the status of expert knowledge, or the conditions of academic labour – and flagrant continuities (of sexism, racism and other structural inequalities within and beyond academia).

This symposium brings together scholars from a range of disciplines who are empirically examining the relationship between power, knowledge and feminism from very different perspectives and across different contexts. It is being organised to celebrate the publication of Maria do Mar Pereira’s new book Power, Knowledge and Feminist Scholarship: an Ethnography of Academia, which will be launched at the event.

The symposium will feature talks by:

Emily will share insights from her ethnographic research on gender knowledge production at feminist academic conferences in the UK, India and the US

Lata will reflect on the relations between power, knowledge and feminism in the work of knowledge brokers committed to promoting women’s empowerment, drawing on empirical work undertaken in India and the UK

Lena will discuss the politics of contemporary academic labour from a feminist perspective

  • · Dr Maria do Mar Pereira (Department of Sociology and Centre for the Study of Women and Gender, University of Warwick)

Maria do Mar will talk about the negotiation of the status of feminist scholarship in the neoliberal universities, drawing on her ethnography of academia in Portugal

The symposium will be opened by Prof Nickie Charles (Director of the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender, University of Warwick) and chaired by Dr Cath Lambert (Department of Sociology, University of Warwick).

 

This event is free and open to all, and refreshments will be provided.

We ask that participants book in advance to make sure we order the right amount of food and drink. You can book HERE.

 

PLEASE JOIN US FOR THIS DISCUSSION AND CELEBRATION!

 

This symposium is organised by the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender, and the “Inequalities and Social Change” Research Cluster in the Department of Sociology, University of Warwick.

 

Directions:

A0.23 is located in the Social Sciences building. Click here for a floorplan showing the exact location of the room – look for the red arrows at the bottom of the image!

For directions to the Social Sciences building and the University of Warwick, click here

Tue 10 Oct, '17
-
CSWG Film Club: Screening of "Daughters of the Dust" with Post-Screening Discussion
Warwick Arts Centre Cinema

Following a multi-generational family of the Gullah community – descendants of West African slaves who have preserved and retained many of their ancestors’ Yoruba traditions – the film explores the community's struggle to maintain their cultural heritage. As the first wide release by a Black woman filmmaker, Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust was met with critical acclaim and rapturous audience response.

For those who know their pop culture, Daughters of the Dust was the inspiration for Beyonce’s visual album, Lemonade.

https://www.beyonce.com/album/lemonade-visual-album/?media_view=video 

After the film, join us for a panel discussion featuring Meleisa Ono-George, Kathryn Medien and Akwugo Emejulu.

 

Mon 16 Oct, '17
-
Sociology Film Club
OC1.06
Mon 23 Oct, '17
-
Sociology Film Club
OC1.06
Mon 30 Oct, '17
-
Sociology Film Club
OC1.06
Mon 6 Nov, '17
-
Sociology Film Club
OC1.06
Wed 8 Nov, '17
-
CSWG Graduate Seminars - Violence, sexualities and (dis)empowerment
R1.13, Ramphal Building
· Hande Güzel (University of Cambridge) - “Re-virginization and Its Authorities: Stories of (dis)empowerment "
· Sabrina Moro (Nottingham Trent University) - “ Fame-inism and the politics of celebrity confessional"
Mon 13 Nov, '17
-
Sociology Film Club
OC1.06
Mon 20 Nov, '17
-
Sociology Film Club
OC1.06
Wed 22 Nov, '17
-
CSWG Graduate Seminars - Re-negotiating femininities
R1.13, Ramphal Building
· Rosie Walters (University of Bristol) - "Connecting the Dots?: Young women’s participation in the UN Foundation’s Girl Up programme."
 · Charlotte Sefton (University of Exeter) - “Mothers/Others: Sudanese Women (Re)negotiating Motherhood in Diaspora”
Thu 23 Nov, '17
-
Seminar: 'The problem of the state in gender and sexuality thinking and politics'
R0.12

What 'state' are we in? Re-visiting the problem of the state in gender and sexuality thinking and politics

a talk by Sonia Corrêa (Sexuality Policy Watch; LSE - Department of Gender Studies)

(discussant: Liz Ablett, University of Warwick)

Abstract:

Over the course of the last twenty years or so, multiple strands of genders and sexualities organizing and mobilizing, both North and South of the Equator, have moved from critical and distanced positionality in relation to the state towards engagement with the law, human rights, and biopolitical apparatuses and devices (in particular biomedicine). This displacement is not trivial as it locates its actors, subjects and substance of this politics in the realms of norm codification and power deployment and has created multilayered tensions and rifts both within sexual politics and at cross roads of theorizing and action. Questions have been and continued to be raised about if and how transformative politics of genders and sexualities can or not engage ‘the state’.

Although these questions are far from new, they gain new contours, ramifications and complications under current conditions of both national and global conjunctures characterized by right wing populist revivals (sometimes in fascist manifestations), the prevalence of a cynical electoral and parliamentarian politics and authoritarian entrenchment of sovereignties. Under these conditions, if the politics of genders and sexualities are indeed committed to intersectionality the global problem of states being shrunk to their managerial and police functions (in some cases imperialist policing) and stripped of its enabling infra structural role can be hardly circumvented.

The lecture will chart past and present debates around engaging the state, through the revisiting of authors within and outside gender and sexuality field. In doing so it will recapture and highlight streams of Latin American theorizing on the ‘the state as a problem” that have not travelled much, particularly in what concerns the religious imprints in the tutelary features of state formation. While mapping the theoretical underpinnings of the debate it will also bring to the discussion empirical illustrations of the multilayered angles of gender and sexuality claims of juridical belonging and social inclusion, including the contentions with the religious and some of their paradoxical effects. These excursions do not aim to exhaust the questions previously raised, but they might add new interrogations to this area of inquiry.

 

Speaker Bio:

Since the late 1970´s Sonia Corrêa has been involved in research and advocacy activities related to gender equality, health and sexuality. Sonia co-chairs Sexuality Policy Watch (SPW), a global forum comprised of researchers and activists engaged in the analyses of global trends in sexuality related policy and politics. She is currently a Visiting Leverhulme Professor at the Department of Gender Studies, LSE.

 

The seminar will chaired by Dr Maria do Mar Pereira (Department of Sociology, and Centre for the Study of Women and Gender, University of Warwick).

 

This event is free and open to all, and refreshments will be provided.

We ask that participants book in advance to make sure we order the right amount of food and drink. You can book here:

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/sociology/research/centres/gender/archive/registration

Mon 27 Nov, '17
-
Sociology Film Club
OC1.06
Fri 1 Dec, '17
-
Symposium: Community - Solidarity - Resistance
S2.77

This symposium celebrates the launch of 3 new books examining, from feminist and intersectional perspectives, contemporary politics of community, solidarity and resistance. The authors of the three books will speak at the event, and will explore the implications of each of their books in relation to this overall theme. The symposium will feature:

  • Cynthia Cockburn (City University London and University of Warwick), author of Looking to London: Stories of War, Escape and Asylum (2017, Pluto)
  • Akwugo Emejulu (University of Warwick) and Leah Bassel (University of Leicester), authors of Minority Women and Austerity: Survival and Resistance in France and Britain (2017, Policy Press)
  • Khursheed Wadia (University of Warwick), co-author of Muslim Women and Power: Political and Civic Engagement in West European Societies (2017, Routledge)

The symposium will be chaired by Prof Nickie Charles (Director of the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender, University of Warwick).

This event is free and open to all, and lunch will be provided.

We ask that participants book in advance to make sure we order the right amount of food and drink, and to receive information about the venue. To book, click here:

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/sociology/research/centres/gender/archive/registration

This symposium is organised by the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender, and the “Inequalities and Social Change” Research Cluster in the Department of Sociology, University of Warwick.

Mon 4 Dec, '17
-
Sociology Film Club
OC1.06
Mon 15 Jan, '18
-
Sociology Film Club
R0.12
Tue 16 Jan, '18
-
Sociology Lunch - Equality
S0.13
Tue 16 Jan, '18
-
CSWG Party / Salon
IAS Seminar Room (Milburn House)

Come and celebrate the new year with CSWG members old and new.

There will be hot food and drinks!

Please register in advance here: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/sociology/research/centres/gender/archive/registration

Wed 17 Jan, '18
-
Anti-colonial resistance is fertile: sperm smuggling and birth strikes in Palestine/Israel
SO.28 (Social Studies)

A lecture by Dr Siggie Vertommen (KCL)

All welcome.

Mon 22 Jan, '18
-
Sociology Film Club
R0.12
Wed 24 Jan, '18
-
CSWG Graduate Seminars - Women in Politicised Spaces
R1.13, Ramphal Building
Mon 29 Jan, '18
-
Sociology Film Club
R0.12
Tue 30 Jan, '18
-
CSWG Film Club: Film Screening "In Between"
Warwick Arts Centre Cinema

You are warmly invited to join us for the next event of the CSWG Film Club, a new partnership between CSWG and the Warwick Arts Centre Cinema.

A special screening of the film “In Between” (2016)

with a post-screening discussion featuring guest speakers and students and staff at Warwick, and chaired by Maria do Mar Pereira, Deputy Director of CSWG

In Between is a 2016 film directed by Maysaloun Hamoud, about three Palestinian women living in an apartment in Tel Aviv, and trying to find a balance between traditional and modern culture, caught between the lives they’re aspiring to lead and societal restrictions. Layla is a criminal defence lawyer originally from Nazareth, whose family is secular Muslim, Nour is a religious Muslim woman studying computer science at Tel Aviv University and Salma is a lesbian DJ from a Christian family.

https://www.warwickartscentre.co.uk/whats-on/2018/in-between-/

This event is open to all, including the general public.

Tickets for the screening cost between £3.50 and £9.00, and can be purchased from the Warwick Arts Centre Box Office in person, or online through the Warwick Arts Centre website.

We may have free tickets available to give away to members of CSWG, Sociology students and staff, and students taking the IATL MA module “Ways of Knowing”. If you’d like to be considered for a free ticket, please sign up here.

Mon 5 Feb, '18
-
Sociology Film Club
R0.12
Wed 7 Feb, '18
-
CSWG Graduate Seminars - 'Invisible' working Spaces
R1.13, Ramphal Building
Mon 19 Feb, '18
-
Sociology Film Club
R0.12
Mon 26 Feb, '18
-
Sociology Film Club
R0.12
Mon 5 Mar, '18
-
Sociology Film Club
R0.12
Wed 7 Mar, '18
-
CSWG Graduate Seminars - Agency, Resistance and Social Transformations
R1.13, Ramphal Building
Mon 12 Mar, '18
-
Sociology Film Club
R0.12
Tue 15 May, '18 - Wed 15 May, '19
3pm - 5pm
Women in American Soccer and European Football: Different Roads to Shared Glory
Social Sciences Building, S0.19

Runs from Tuesday, May 15 to Wednesday, May 15.

Prof Andrei Markovits is at Warwick as a Visiting Fellow in IAS. In this seminar he will talk about the opposite paths that women have traversed in the game of Association Football on both sides of the Atlantic. Whereas the women in North America entered a field that was virtually open for them since men busily covered the playing fields and cultural space of the hegemonic team sports of baseball, football (American and Canadian), basketball and ice hockey; their European counterparts were forced to contest what has arguably been the most male-dominated space in European public life throughout much of the 20th century. Both of these roads harbored immense obstacles. Both entailed challenges of their own that these pioneering women had to overcome. However, spurred by the massively important and popular World Cup tournaments, the last three decades have led to a rapprochement of developments on both sides of the Atlantic by catapulting women's soccer onto hitherto unexpected, maybe even unimaginable heights.

He has written a book on the subject.

Andy is the Karl W Deutsch Collegiate Professor of Comparative Politics and German Studies and an Arthur F Thurnau Professor at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

All are welcome to this seminar. Drinks and nibbles will be available afterwards. No registration necessary.

Wed 6 Jun, '18
-
Queer History Reading Group
H0.58
Wed 6 Jun, '18
-
Seminar: “Women’s Movement in India: Questions from the Contemporary Context”
S0.10 (Social Sciences Building)

Speaker: Prof. Indu Agnihotri, CWDS, New Delhi

The recent surge in of horrific incidences of violence against women and girls in India have firmly refocused attention towards the place of women in the Indian society especially in the wider context of the consolidation of the Hindu-nationalist electoral and cultural politics across the country. The women’s movement in India has been at the forefront of protests against gender based violence and women’s rights at home, in public spaces and at work places. The Pinjra Tod campaign, the Pink Chaddi campaign, and host of new campaigns have deployed social media tools to carry forward the emancipatory traditions of the Women’ movement. The recent publication of Raya Sarkar’s list of sexual predators in Indian academia on the lines of the #Metoo movement in the West has highlighted the internal dilemmas and contradictions within the contemporary women’s movement. It can be said that with the wider socio-political onslaught of Hindu nationalist politics and the emergence of new voices, styles and strategies of mobilization the women’s movement in India finds itself in an interesting cross-road in the contemporary times.

Prof. Indu Agnihotri’s talk will take stock of the contemporary women’s movement in India discussing a wide range of issues related the the changing socio-political milieu within and outside the movement.

About the speaker:

Prof. Indu Agnihotri is the Director of Center for Women and Development Studies. She is interested in the area of Women’s Movement, Resistance and Change in India.

The event is free to attend. Tea and light refreshments will be provided.

Supported by: GRP International Development, Another India and CSWG

Wed 6 Jun, '18
-
Seminar: "Ethnography, Gifts, and Relations: Or The (Un)Desired Gender Identities of Baking Your Way through Fieldwork"
S0.10 (Social Sciences Building)

Ethnography, Gifts, and Relations: Or The (Un)Desired Gender Identities of Baking Your Way through Fieldwork

Pedro Monteiro (University of Warwick)

Abstract:

The social sciences, especially those studies with an interactionist stamp, can be characterized as a study of social relations; and in ethnography, we find ourselves investigating social relations through relations. While rapport and the challenges involved in the ethnographic encounter have been widely discussed, the theme of gifts from/to informants is still a taboo. In this presentation, I reflect on my experience in conducting ethnographic fieldwork in a large industrial organization and the chain of gifts — especially food offers — shared with informants. I explore how these material-effective exchanges shaped my (gender) identity and my access to specific individuals and groups in the organization. I argue that gift exchanges offer a ‘concrete’ basis to explore current debates in (feminist) ethnography about rapport and fieldwork relations thus enabling us to re-think the dichotomy between collaborative and exploitative research.

Speaker Bio:

Pedro Monteiro is an Early Career Fellow at Warwick's Institute of Advanced Study and a Research Fellow at Warwick Business School. He is an ethnographer of work and organizations with a particular interest in classic themes in management and organization studies. In 2018, he received the Academy of Management's Louis Pondy Award for Best Dissertation Paper.
 

The seminar will be chaired by Maria do Mar Pereira (Department of Sociology, and Centre for the Study of Women and Gender, University of Warwick).

This event is free and open to all, and refreshments will be provided. Pedro will generously offer some of his own (amazing!) baking, to enact and demonstrate the real-life baking exchanges he will describe in the paper. An opportunity not to be missed!

Mon 11 Jun, '18
-
Annual Lecture: Cynthia Enloe - "What are the International Politics of #MeToo?"
MS.03.B3

Photo of Cynthia Enloe

Join us for our CSWG Annual Lecture, co-sponsored by the Department of Politics and International Studies. The Annual Lecture will feature the renowned feminist scholar, Professor Cynthia Enloe, discussing one of the key contemporary movements of transnational feminist activism, #MeToo.

"What are the International Politics of #MeToo?"

Cynthia Enloe (Clark University)

Abstract:

#MeToo is treated chiefly as a local gendered phenomena, country by country, industry by industry. What do we who are seeking to make sense of diverse international politics have to learn from taking seriously #MeToo about the ways in which local dynamics shape and reshape international power? What does #MeToo tell us about the relevance of misogyny to international politics?

This event is free and open to all (no registration required), and will be followed by a wine reception.

Useful Information

  • For information on getting to the University of Warwick, see here.
  • You can find a map of campus here. The lecture will take place in the Maths and Stats building, which appears at the top of the map.
  • If you have any questions or need special assistance, please do not hesitate to contact Nickie Charles (Nickie.Charles@warwick.ac.uk).
Wed 13 Jun, '18
-
Public Lecture - Luce Irigaray: "How to Give Birth to a New Human Being"
Oculus Building - OC0.04

irigaray poster

As part of a Visiting Fellowship in the Institute of Advanced Study, Luce Irigaray--renowned philosopher, linguist, psychologist, psychoanalyst--will present a public lecture entitled "How to Give Birth to a New Human Being."

Widely recognized as one of the key influential thinkers of our times, Irigaray's work focuses on the development of a culture of sexuate and cultural difference--particularly through the construction of a feminine subjectivity--something she explores in a range of forms, from the philosophical to the scientific, the political and the poetic. The author of over thirty books translated into numerous languages, including Speculum of the Other Woman (1974), her most recent book To Be Born: Genesis of a New Human Being (2017) proposes nothing less than a new conception of being as well as a means to ensure its individual and relational development since birth.

This event is free and open to all (no registration required) and will be followed by a wine reception and book signing (limited books will be available for cash purchase at the event). Please circulate in your networks!

Useful Information:

  • For directions to the University of Warwick please click here
  • The lecture will take place in The Oculus, Room 0.04. You can find an interactive campus map here
  • If you have any questions or need special assistance, please do not hesitate to contact Stephen Seely (s.seely@warwick.ac.uk)

This event is sponsored by the Institute of Advanced Study, the Department of Sociology, the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender, and the "Connecting Cultures" Global Research Priority at University of Warwick.

Thu 14 Jun, '18
-
Symposium: Feminism, Queer and Neoliberalism - Critique, Complicity and Complexity
Oculus Building - OC0.04

This symposium brings together academics, activists and artists from a range of disciplines to discuss the relationship between feminism, queer and neoliberalism. We will consider how feminism and queer have resisted neoliberalism, and how feminism and queer have been complicit with it, but we also want to go beyond that conventional binary framing and engage with the many complexities of that dynamic relationship. The symposium will feature panels on feminism as a brand/commodity, on feminism within/against neoliberalism in international development and social movements, and on activism and art.

This event is free and open to all, but participants must book in advance. You can book here.

If you have any questions, please email Maria do Mar Pereira on m.d.m.pereira@warwick.ac.uk.

 

The venue is wheelchair accessible with accessible toilets nearby. If you face other access barriers or require more detailed accessibility information, please let us know (by emailing Maria do Mar Pereira on m.d.m.pereira@warwick.ac.uk or calling Amy Burdis on 02476524771) so we can support your full participation.

 

This symposium is organised by the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender, and the “Inequalities and Social Change” Research Cluster in the Department of Sociology, University of Warwick.

Wed 24 Oct, '18
-
CSWG Graduate Seminar
E0.23
Fri 2 Nov, '18
-
Public Lecture - Nadje Al-Ali: "Feminist dilemmas: How to talk about gender-based violence in relation to the Middle East?"
MS.05 (Zeeman Building)

Speaker: Prof Nadje Al-Ali (SOAS)

Discussant: Dr Nicola Pratt (Warwick)

Event Details:

This event is free and open to all (no registration required), and will be followed by a reception.

 Abstract:

The talk will chart my trajectories and dilemmas as a feminist activist/academic to research, write and talk about gender based violence (GBV) with reference in to the Middle East. More specifically I will be drawing on research and activism in relation to Iraq, Turkey as well as Lebanon to map the discursive, political and empirical challenges and complexities linked to scholarship and activism that is grounded in both feminist and anti racist/anti-Islamophobic politics.

The political and academic aim to challenge essentialised ideas of Middle Eastern exceptionalism and conflated notions of Muslim, Arab/Middle Eastern culture has clearly been an on-going and familiar motivation for many academics/activists researching and writing on women and gender issues. Maybe more controversially I will reflect on my increasing discomfort with narratives about GBV that focus solely on the impact of external factors, mainly framed with reference to imperialism and neo-liberalism , instead of recognising not simply complicity but pro-active involvement of various local and regional actors. Drawing on my previous work on Iraq, and my more recent work on the Kurdish women's movement and queer feminist activism in Lebanon, I will share the dilemmas and tensions of involved in a transnational feminist knowledge production and activism.

Speaker Bio:

Nadje Al-Ali is Professor of Gender Studies at the Centre for Gender Studies (CGS), SOAS University of London. She is currently chair of CGS but will leave SOAS to take up a new position in anthropology with reference to the Middle East at Brown University in January. Her main research interests revolve around feminist activism; transnational migration and diaspora moblization; war, conflict and peace; as well as art & cultural studies; mainly with reference to Iraq, Egypt, Turkey and the Kurdish political movement. Her publications include What kind of Liberation? Women and the Occupation of Iraq (2009, University of California Press, co-authored with Nicola Pratt); Women and War in the Middle East: Transnational Perspectives (Zed Books, 2009, co-edited with Nicola Pratt); Iraqi Women: Untold Stories from 1948 to the Present (2007, Zed Books); New Approaches to Migration (ed., Routledge, 2002, with Khalid Koser); Secularism, Gender and the State in the Middle East (Cambridge University Press 2000) as well as numerous book chapters and journal articles. Her co-edited book with Deborah al-Najjar entitled We are Iraqis: Aesthetics & Politics in a Time of War (Syracuse University Press) won the 2014 Arab-American book prize for non-fiction. Her more recent research and publications focus on the Turkish-Kurdish conflict and the Kurdish women’s movement.

Professor Al-Ali was President of the Association of Middle East Women’s Studies (AMEWS) from 2009-2011. She has been a member of the Feminist Review Collective, and is on the editorial board of Kohl: a journal of body and gender research. She was involved in several projects with Iraqi academics and women’s rights activists with the aim to facilitate the introduction of women and gender studies and increase evidence-based research capacity in Iraq.

 

Useful Information:

  • For information on getting to the University of Warwick, see here.
  • You can find a map of campus here. The lecture will take place in the Zeeman (Maths and Stats building), which appears at the top of the map.
  • The venue is wheelchair accessible with accessible toilets nearby. If you face other access barriers or require more detailed accessibility information, please let us know so we can support your full participation.
  • We are unfortunately not able to offer childcare for this event, but babies and children are very welcome, and we will do our best to provide any amenities and adjustments necessary to support colleagues bringing babies or children.
  • If you have any questions or need special assistance, please do not hesitate to contact Maria do Mar Pereira (m.d.m.pereira@warwick.ac.uk)
Wed 21 Nov, '18
-
CSWG Graduate Seminar - State and Gender
E0.23
Wed 28 Nov, '18
-
CSWG Graduate Seminar - Narratives of Embodiment
E0.23
Wed 28 Nov, '18
-
CSWG Film Club - 'Skate Kitchen'
S0.19

You are warmly invited to join us for another session of the CSWG Film Club, co-organised by CSWG and Yasmina Maiga (Sociology).

Film: “Skate Kitchen” (2018), including a post-screening discussion

Wednesday, November 28th

at 6.00 in S0.19

For those of you that aren’t familiar with skate culture and even for those who are or think they are, the link between gender and skateboarding can seem a little farfetched. Nonetheless, ever since its creation, this anti-field sport has proved to be a powerful means of political activism, allowing women to bring feminism from the lecture halls to the streets in new and powerful ways.

Skate Kitchen focuses precisely on the connections between skateboarding, subcultures, gender, feminism and race. Directed by Crystal Moselle, it is a coming-of-age movie following the life of a young girl and her fellow skateboarders in the depths of New York City’s underground scene. For the trailer, click here: https://www.skatekitchenfilm.com/

The screening of the film will be followed by a post-show discussion featuring:

  • Dr Emma Beckett (Sociology)
  • Yasmina Maiga (Sociology)
  • Pablo Anto (Warwick Skate Society)
  • Chair: Dr Maria do Mar Pereira (Sociology)

This event is free and open to all, including the general public.

Thu 29 Nov, '18
-
Seminar: "Postethnic Activism in the Nordic Region - From Antiracist Feminism to Urban Mobilisation in Racialised Areas”
S1.50 (Social Sciences Building)

“Postethnic Activism in the Nordic Region - From Antiracist Feminism to Urban Mobilisation in Racialised Areas”

Suvi Keskinen (University of Helsinki)

Abstract:
The presentation discusses the new wave of activism in Sweden, Denmark and Finland that is framed around being racialised as other/non-white by the surrounding society rather than on ethnic group membership. It examines the understandings of the 'common' and the intersections of gender, race and class in these notions, as well as the dilemmas of alliance-building.

Speaker Bio:
Suvi Keskinen is Academy of Finland Research Fellow and Professor at the Centre for Research on Ethnic Relations and Nationalism, University of Helsinki, Finland. For more on Suvi’s work, see https://tuhat.helsinki.fi/portal/en/person/suvikesk 

The seminar will be chaired by Maria do Mar Pereira.

This event is free and open to all. You do not have to register in advance.
We will NOT provide refreshments, but you’re more than welcome to bring your lunch and eat it at the seminar!

Please join us for this talk, organised by CSWG and the Department of Sociology

Useful Information:

  • For information on getting to the University of Warwick, see here.
  • You can find a map of campus here. The lecture will take place in the Social Sciences building, which appears at the centre of the map.
  • The venue is wheelchair accessible. If you face other access barriers or require more detailed accessibility information, please let us know so we can support your full participation.
  • We are unfortunately not able to offer childcare for this event, but babies and children are fully and warmly welcomed, and we will do our best to provide any amenities and adjustments necessary to support colleagues bringing babies or children.
  • If you have any questions or need special assistance, please do not hesitate to contact Laura Elwyn (L.Elwyn@warwick.ac.uk).
Wed 5 Dec, '18
-
Symposium: Trans and Intersex Rights in Health and Education – Discourse, Power and Possibility
S0.09 (Social Sciences Building)

How are trans and intersex lives defined, managed and contested in healthcare, education, and community settings?

This event will bring together scholars and practitioners to discuss current research, practice and debates, with talks drawing on a range of social, clinical, and historical perspectives. It has been organised to celebrate the publication of Ruth Pearce’s new book, Understanding Trans Health.

The event will centre the insights of trans and intersex activists, researchers and practitioners, and include plenty of time for questions and discussion.

The symposium will feature talks by:

  • Dr Kate Nambiar: Kate is a medical doctor who works at Clinic T, a trans-specific sexual health centre based in Brighton. She will be presenting a talk entitled: By us, for us: Trans led healthcare in sexual health and beyond
  • Dr David Griffiths: David is an interdisciplinary researcher based in the Sociology Department at the University of Surrey. He will be talking about intersex politics in the UK during the 1960s/70s, and exploring intersections with developments in trans and gay rights and healthcare as well as the impact on the situation today.
  • Dr Alfrancio Dias: Alfrancio is a researcher based in the Department of Education of the Federal University of Sergipe (Brazil). He will discuss his work on the experiences of trans students in universities in Brazil.
  • and our keynote speaker, Dr Ruth Pearce, based in the School of Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Leeds. The title of Ruth’s talk will be The Gender Experts: Clinical Discourse and Becoming Trans.

This event is free and open to all, and refreshments will be provided.

We ask that participants book in advance to make sure we order the right amount of food and drink. You can book here.

Useful Information:

  • For information on getting to the University of Warwick, see here.
  • You can find a map of campus here. The lecture will take place in the Social Sciences building, which appears at the centre of the map.
  • The venue is wheelchair accessible with accessible, gender-neutral toilets nearby. If you face other access barriers or require more detailed accessibility information, please let us know so we can support your full participation.
  • We are unfortunately not able to offer childcare for this event, but babies and children are fully and warmly welcomed, and we will do our best to provide any amenities and adjustments necessary to support colleagues bringing babies or children.
  • If you have any questions or need special assistance, please do not hesitate to contact Laura Elwyn (L.Elwyn@warwick.ac.uk).

This symposium is organised by the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender, and the “Inequalities and Social Change” Research Cluster in the Department of Sociology, University of Warwick.

Wed 16 Jan, '19
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CSWG Graduate Seminar - Queerness and Faith
E0.23
Wed 30 Jan, '19
-
CSWG Graduate Seminar - Sexual Consent
E0.23
Wed 20 Feb, '19
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Seminar: "The Emotional Politics of Feminist Coalition"
E0.23 - Social Sciences Building

CSWG Lunchtime Seminar:
“The Emotional Politics of Feminist Coalition: Learning to Listen by Provincializing the Generalised Feminist Subject”
Lisa Kalayji (University of Edinburgh)

Abstract:
Historical moments of heavy socio-political upheaval shake up the social bonds and identity categories through which collective agitation for change is mobilised (Hall, 1966), and feminists presently find ourselves at just such an electrified conjuncture. Far-right politics are in ascendancy around the globe, grassroots resistance is thriving, and emergent political consciousnesses are being articulated into and out of existence through roiling local struggles. The time is both ripe and urgent for feminists to pursue stronger solidarities, more efficacious political consciousness, and greater accountability to one another. In this talk, I will examine the emotionality of inter-feminist relationships, focusing particularly on schisms around cissexism and racism. Drawing upon my historical research on radical feminism in Britain in the 1980s, I trace the historical emergence and sedimentation of emotionalised discourses of inclusion and exclusion in radical feminism’s emotion culture. Placing this historical work in conversation with reflections on efforts to understand my own experiences of patriarchal violence, I elaborate the necessity of interdisciplinary and intersectional thinking as preconditions for meaningful feminist dialogue. I argue that cis, white feminists’ defensive and projective responses to narrations of the lived realities of trans women and women of colour are rooted in frustrated and failed efforts to understand our own experiences through the analytic lens of a generalised feminist subject and the inclusions and exclusions upon which it relies. Such an approach is inadequate to explain the lives of even the most privileged women, inevitably forestalling the authentic listening necessary for fruitful and accountable inter-feminist relationships. By using an interdisciplinary analytic toolkit and an intersectional lens, the specificity of all gendered oppressions is illuminated, the co-constitution of all subject positions of privilege and oppression is foregrounded, and greater space is thereby forged for deeper and more lasting feminist coalitions.

Speaker Bio:
Lisa Kalayji is a feminist sociologist interested in the cultural politics of emotion and affect. Her doctoral research explored the emotion culture of radical feminism in Britain in the 1980s, and she is currently doing work on decolonising emotion and affect theories and on the role of emotion in feminist teaching and learning.

The seminar will be chaired by Maria do Mar Pereira, and Demet Gulcicek will act as a discussant.

This event is free and open to all, and lunch will be provided.
We ask that participants book in advance to make sure we order the right amount of food and drink. You can book here.

Useful Information:

  • For information on getting to the University of Warwick, see here.
  • You can find a map of campus here. The lecture will take place in the Social Sciences building, which appears at the centre of the map.
  • The venue is wheelchair accessible with accessible, gender-neutral toilets nearby. If you face other access barriers or require more detailed accessibility information, please let us know so we can support your full participation.
  • We are unfortunately not able to offer childcare for this event, but babies and children are fully and warmly welcomed, and we will do our best to provide any amenities and adjustments necessary to support colleagues bringing babies or children.
  • If you have any questions or need special assistance, please do not hesitate to contact Laura Elwyn (L.Elwyn@warwick.ac.uk)
Thu 21 Feb, '19
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Seminar: "Moderate Feminism Within or Against the Neoliberal University? The Example of Athena SWAN"
S2.79 – Social Sciences Building

Lunchtime Seminar
co-organised by the Faculty of Social Sciences Athena Working Group and the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender

Discussion of the article
“Moderate feminism within or against the neoliberal university? The example of Athena SWAN”
featuring the authors, Ruth Pearce (University of Leeds) and Charikleia Tzanakou (University of Warwick – TBC)

At this lunchtime seminar, we will be discussing a recently published article by two current and former Warwick colleagues, offering a critical and empirical analysis of Athena SWAN. Attendees will be asked to read, or skim through, the article beforehand, and the session time will be dedicated to discussing the findings, and the questions they raise, with the authors of the article and other colleagues from a range of Faculties involved in Athena Swan.

The article can be downloaded for free here: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gwao.12336
(If you’re having difficulties accessing the article, please email m.d.m.pereira@warwick.ac.uk)

We welcome all academic and administrative colleagues from all Faculties and Services throughout the University, and hope you will enjoy this chance to debate important and topical questions about Athena SWAN, whether you’re very familiar with it, or just becoming acquainted with it.

This event is free and open to all, and lunch will be provided.
We ask that participants book in advance to make sure we order the right amount of food and drink. You can book here.

Useful Information:

  • The venue is wheelchair accessible with accessible, gender-neutral toilets nearby. If you face other access barriers or require more detailed accessibility information, please let us know so we can support your full participation.
  • We are unfortunately not able to offer childcare for this event, but babies and children are fully and warmly welcomed, and we will do our best to provide any amenities and adjustments necessary to support colleagues bringing babies or children. To discuss this, please contact Laura Elwyn (L.Elwyn@warwick.ac.uk)
  • If you have any questions or need special assistance, please do not hesitate to contact Laura Elwyn (L.Elwyn@warwick.ac.uk)
Tue 26 Feb, '19
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Seminar: “The Politics of Cultural Work: Inequality, Entrepreneurialism and Precarity”
R3.25 - Ramphal

“The Politics of Cultural Work: Inequality, Entrepreneurialism and Precarity”
Christina Scharff (King’s College London)

Abstract:
Work in the cultural and creative industries is often described as fulfilling and deeply satisfying, but research has demonstrated that it’s also precarious and marked by ongoing inequalities along the lines of gender, race, and class. This presentation will draw on research on the classical music profession in Berlin and London to discuss and problematise three features of contemporary, creative labour: 1) the underpinning entrepreneurial work ethos, 2) ongoing inequalities, 3) and precariousness. In focusing on these dynamics, special attention will be paid to the dimensions of gender and subjectivity.

Speaker Bio:
Christina Scharff is Senior Lecturer in Culture, Media and Creative Industries at King’s College London. Her research interests are in gender, media, and culture with a focus on engagements with feminism and the politics of creative work. Christina is author of Repudiating Feminism: Young Women in a Neoliberal World (Ashgate, 2012) and, most recently, Gender, Subjectivity, and Cultural Work: The Classical Music Profession (Routledge, 2018). She co-edited (with Rosalind Gill) the books New Femininities: Postfeminism, Neoliberalism and Subjectivity (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011); Aesthetic Labour: Rethinking Beauty Politics in Neoliberalism (with Ana Sofia Elias and Rosalind Gill) (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017); and Digital Feminisms: Transnational activism in German protest cultures (with Carrie Smith-Prei and Maria Stehle).

This event is free and open to all, with no advance registration required. It will be followed by a reception.

Useful Information:

  • For information on getting to the University of Warwick, see here.
  • You can find a map of campus here. The lecture will take place in the Ramphal building, which appears at the centre of the map.
  • The venue is wheelchair accessible with accessible, gender-neutral toilets nearby. If you face other access barriers or require more detailed accessibility information, please let us know so we can support your full participation.
  • We are unfortunately not able to offer childcare for this event, but babies and children are fully and warmly welcomed, and we will do our best to provide any amenities and adjustments necessary to support colleagues bringing babies or children.
  • If you have any questions or need special assistance, please do not hesitate to contact Laura Elwyn (L.Elwyn@warwick.ac.uk)
Wed 6 Mar, '19
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CSWG Graduate Seminar - Contested Masculinities
E0.23
Fri 8 Mar, '19
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Workshop: "Doing Feminist Pedagogy in Contemporary Universities: Old Dilemmas and New Challenges"
LIB1 - Library Building

This workshop will bring staff and students together to reflect on how we might rethink and redo feminist pedagogy in the present, in light of old dilemmas and new challenges, including the working/studying conditions of the neoliberal university, changing student activist cultures, an epidemic of mental health issues among staff and students, or calls for a more intersectional, liberated curriculum.

It features the following speakers (in alphabetical order):

Janine Francois (University of Bedfordshire): Moving from Safe Spaces to Brave Spaces: How ‘Intersectionality’ can Facilitate Difficult Conversation within Teaching and Learning

Radhika Govinda (University of Edinburgh): 'Mirror Mirror on the Wall..." The Promise and Perils of Decolonising Feminist Classrooms

Awino Okech (SOAS): Reflections on Inclusive Pedagogy

Nicola Rivers (University of Gloucestershire): Resisting Resilience: The Role of Vulnerability in the Neoliberal Academy

This event is free and open to all, including staff, students (of all levels) and visitors from outside the University of Warwick.

All participants must book in advance. You can book here.

You are welcome to drop in throughout the afternoon, and attend only part of the event.

Useful Information:

  • For information on getting to the University of Warwick, see here.
  • You can find a map of campus here. The lecture will take place in the Library building, which appears at the centre of the map.
  • The venue is wheelchair accessible and has accessible, gender-neutral toilets nearby. If you face other access barriers or require more detailed accessibility information, please let us know so we can support your full participation.
  • We are unfortunately not able to offer childcare for this event, but babies and children are fully and warmly welcomed, and we will do our best to provide any amenities and adjustments necessary to support colleagues bringing babies or children.
  • If you have any questions, need special assistance or want to discuss adjustments we can make for babies and children, please do not hesitate to contact Laura Elwyn (L.Elwyn@warwick.ac.uk)
Wed 1 May, '19
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29th May. Room: S2:09: 12.30 Professor Loraine Gelsthorpe - "Women in Conflict with the law and the Criminal Justice Dance"

Dear all,

It is with great pleasure to warmly invite you to attend a talk by an internationally renowned feminist criminologist: Professor Loraine Gelsthorpe, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge. Her paper is entitled: ‘Women in conflict with the law and the criminal justice dance’. The talk is organised by Professor Azrini Wahidin and the Criminal Justice Centre, Co-directors: Dr Ana Aliverti and Professor Vanessa Munroe.

Date: 29th May. Room: S2:09. Lunch 12.30

The research seminar will start at 1pm and last for an hour -preceded by a buffet lunch at 12.30. The seminar format is quite informal, structured around a 30 minutes presentation and the remaining time for questions. The seminar will be held at Faculty of Social Science, in the Law School.

Women in conflict with the law and the criminal justice dance

This seminar will focus on the rather erratic developments in regard to criminal justice policy concerning women over the years, making particular note of steps forwards and backwards and what is now needed for policy and practice development. The seminar will briefly highlight what we know about 'what works' with women, but also what else we need to know in order to make advances in thinking and practice.

I look forward to seeing you there,

Professor Azrini Wahidin

 

Loraine Gelsthorpe was born in North Nottinghamshire, England, although she spent some early years of her life in Germany (her mother was German).

 

Loraine is Director of the Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, UK, and Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice, and has worked in the Institute since 1994. She had studied at Sussex University to begin with, followed by training and then working as a social worker for a three-year period. What was intended as a one year stay at the Institute of Criminology to study for the M.Phil in Criminology turned into four and a half years when she was persuaded to do a PhD as well, relinquishing the opportunity to serve as a probation officer in Bristol. Post-doctoral appointments at Lancaster University, Bangor University and then the LSE then took her into London to study social work and police decision-making in regard to young offenders, five different prisons to study prisoners’ experiences of different prison regimes in England, and then into different probation areas to look at race and gender issues in pre-sentence reports (once called social inquiry reports).

 

Loraine has wide ranging interests: criminal justice decision-making and sentencing, women, crime and criminal justice, policy developments relating to women, and ‘what works’ with women, and more generally community penalties, and the links between criminal justice and social justice. She is currently doing research on deaths under community supervision, and on a community housing and support project for women leaving prison. Loraine is a member of the Government’s HM Inspectorate of Probation Advisory Committee, and a Fellow of the Probation Institute in England and Wales. She is also a member of the Howard League for Penal Reform’s Research Advisory Committee, and a member of the 2021 REF sub-committee: Social Policy & Social Work. Loraine is also a trained psychoanalytic psychotherapist (UKCP registered and accredited).

 

Loraine has an extensive publications list, including chapters in successive Oxford Handbooks of Criminology, and the Routledge Handbook of European Criminology. Her most recent book is: Research Ethics in Criminology edited by M. Cowburn, L. Gelsthorpe & A. Wahidin, A. (Eds) (2017) (London: Routledge). See also: Gelsthorpe, L. (2018) ‘After Corston: community, change, and challenges’ in L. Moore, P. Scraton and A. Wahidin (eds) Women’s Imprisonment and the case for abolition. Critical Reflections on Corston ten years on. (Abingdon, Oxon, Routledge) and Gelsthorpe, L. and Russell, J. (2018) ‘Women and Penal Reform: Two steps forwards, three steps backwards?’ Political Quarterly, 89, 2, pp 227-236.

 

Wed 1 May, '19
-
Networking Session with Mary Hawkesworth: Meet your Fellow Feminist
S0.09 (Social Sciences Building)

As part of Prof. Mary Hawkesworth's visit to Warwick (jointly organised by PAIS, Sociology and CSWG, and funded by the IAS) we are organising a series of events, including this mentoring and networking session for feminist social scientists.

Colleagues are warmly welcomed to attend this event. It is open to PhD students, early career researchers (including teaching fellows and research assistants) and assistant and associate professors. The event will be chaired by Prof. Akwugo Emejulu (Sociology).

Wed 1 May, '19
-
Public Lecture - Mary Hawkesworth: "Embodied Politics: Reconceptualising State Violence"
S0.19

As part of Prof. Mary Hawkesworth's visit to Warwick (jointly organised by PAIS, Sociology and CSWG, and funded by the IAS) we are organising a series of events, including this public lecture.

The talk will consider manifold ways that the state directly and indirectly engages in violence against women, LGBT and racial minorities - themes developed in Gender and Political Theory: Feminist Reckonings, which will be published by Polity (U.K) in January. This lecture will be chaired by Prof. Shirin Rai (PAIS).

Tue 7 May, '19
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Workshop: "Publish or Be Damned: Workshop on How to Publish in Interdisciplinary Feminist Journals"
S0.28

As part of Prof. Mary Hawkesworth's visit to Warwick (jointly organised by PAIS, Sociology and CSWG, and funded by the IAS) we are organising a series of events, including this workshop.

Professor Hawkesworth’s talk will draw on years of experience as an Editor for Signs and will address the importance of publishing in a publish or perish climate. Signs publishes path-breaking articles, review essays, comparative perspectives, and retrospectives of interdisciplinary interest addressing gender, race, culture, class, nation, and sexuality.

This session is open to PhD students, early career researchers (including teaching fellows and research assistants) and assistant and associate professors. Do come along and join us for an engaging discussion. The event will be chaired by Prof Azrini Wahidin (Sociology).

Thu 9 May, '19
-
'Lost Before it Was Found: The LBT Moment in Indian LGBT Activism'
Ramphal 1.03
The Queer History Reading Group and the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender, Warwick, invite you to a lecture by Poorva Rajaram (Delhi) on
'Lost Before it Was Found: The LBT Moment in Indian LGBT Activism'

Date: 9 May 2019
Venue: Ramphal, R1.03, 4-6pm

Chair: Dr Laura Schwartz (History, Warwick); Discussant: Dr Daniel Luther (Sociology, Warwick)
Summary:
This talk draws on the speaker's own experiences of LGBT and feminist activism in India. She will 'descriptively map out and then analyse the two and half decade long career of activism that took place under the collective banner of LBT (Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender). From a period beginning roughly in the 1990s, 'LBT' activists and groups often met as a separate stream. Yet, this history is not particularly well-documented or well-known partly because LBT activists maintained a distance from the international NGO-backed, gay-male led campaign to repeal the sodomy law, Section 377, in India.
In these spaces, we tried to sharpen our understandings of compulsory heterosexuality, forced marriage within religious community and caste, activist over-dependence on the law and the global AIDS-funding paradigm. We also addressed immediate questions like economic livelihoods, crisis intervention, suicide-prevention and the possibility of an autonomous trans activism. Since we had no obvious history to draw upon, much of our labour was focussed on creating a new vocabulary to describe and understand our situation. We had to borrow and transform available activist vocabularies from the human rights world, lesbian subcultures in the west, global marxism, queer theorising from academia and the Indian women’s movement. At a moment when all of us are witnessing the dismantling of the historical experiment that was 'LBT' activism, instead of being content with simple memorialisation or a narrative of loss, I want to reflect on how this history can be creatively mobilised to grapple with political futures.'
Poorva Rajaram is a writer and a co-organiser of the Bangalore Queer Film Festival. She is also a PhD research scholar at the Centre for Historical Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. She used to work as a journalist and co-founded The Ladies Finger, an online women's zine.

This event is open to all. Refreshments will be provided.
Wed 9 Oct, '19
-
Graduate seminar: Grassroots Activism
R0.04

Amanda Ptolomey (University of Glasgow)

“Developing zine-making as a feminist participatory research method to generate new knowledge about disabled girlhoods”

Rebecca Gordon (University of Cambridge)

“Understanding the impact of a grassroots organisation on girls’ educational potential in rural Bihar”

Wed 23 Oct, '19
-
CSWG Graduate Seminar series
R0.04 (Ramphal Building)

Our second seminar of the academic year will be on the theme "Medicine and Health". We will have two amazing presentations by:

Gemma Williams (Birmingham City) - ‘Chronic Health and Menstrual Equity’.

Sara Bamdad (Warwick) - 'Negotiated numbers: communication of uncertainty and risk in the everyday practice of reproductive technologies in Iran’.
No registration required and all welcome! Refreshments will be served.

Fri 25 Oct, '19
-
When feminism wins: gaining the right to abortion in Ireland, a talk by Professor Ailbhe Smyth, Women's Studies, University College, Dublin
Wolfson Research Exchange, Main Library

Ailbhe Smyth is a long-time feminist, lesbian, socialist activist. She was the founding head of Women’s Studies at UCD (University College Dublin) in 1990, and has written about feminism, politics and culture mainly in Ireland. Ailbhe left academia in the mid-2000s to focus on working with women’s community organisations and in social movement politics. She has been involved in many campaigns and was on the Strategic Executive of the victorious same-sex marriage campaign in 2015. She has been fighting for women’s right to choose for over 35 years, and was Co-Director of the Together for Yes national referendum campaign which removed the near-total ban on abortion from the Irish Constitution with a majority of 66% in 2018. She convenes the Coalition to Repeal the 8thAmendment, and is a regular contributor to media and national debate in Ireland. She was included on the Time Magazine list of the 100 most influential people in 2019.

Everyone is welcome to this event. Lunch will be provided and registration is required for catering purposes. Please register for the event here: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/sociology/research/centres/gender/archive/registration

Wed 20 Nov, '19
-
CSWG Graduate Seminar series
S0.09 (Social Science building)

Our third seminar of the academic year will be on the theme "Non-binary histories". We will have two great presentations by:

Katerina Garcia-Walsh (Madrid) - 'Gender Transmutation in Arthur Machen's Occult'

Ellie Mumford (Kingston Art School) - 'Non-binary Fashion Practices'

No registration required and all welcome! Refreshments will be served.

Wed 15 Jan, '20
-
CSWG Graduate Seminar Series - Storytelling and Poetry
S0.09 (Social Science building)


Our first session of the spring term will be on the topic of "Storytelling and Poetry". Presentations by:

  • Ruth Kelly - Red Riding Hood and Women's Rights in Ireland and Uganda
  • Iona Murphy - Disordered Eating and Domesticity: The Mirroring of Anorexia Nervosa in the Poetry of Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton


Everyone is welcome to attend. Refreshments will be served!

 

Fri 17 Jan, '20
-
Violence against Women in Turkey: Vulnerability, Sexuality, and Eros
Wolfson Research Exchange, Main Library

A talk presented by Professor Meltem Ahiska, Professor in the Sociology Department, Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey. Professor Ahiska has research interests in the areas of Orientalism/Occidentalism, critical theory, social memory and gender and has published widely on these topics. Her talk focuses on violence against women in Turkey and draws on a chapter that she contributed to 'Vulnerability in Resistance', a book edited by Judith Butler, Zeynep Gambetti and Leticia Sabsay (2016) and published by Duke University Press. The book and Prof Ahiska's chapter 'offer a feminist account of political agency by exploring ... aesthetic and erotic interventions into public space that mobilise memory and expose forms of power' (https://www.dukeupress.edu/vulnerability-in-resistance).

All are welcome. No registration is needed.

Tue 28 Jan, '20
-
A workshop - Transforming universities: addressing staff sexual misconduct in higher education
The Wolfson Research Exchange, Main Library

This important workshop will be led by Dr Tiffany Page, a founder member of the 1752 group and Lecturer in Sociology at Cambridge University. The 1752 group is a research and lobby organisation which works to end sexual misconduct in Higher Education. The workshop will explore strategies to address staff sexual misconduct and how we can develop research, responses and strategies to change our teaching and research environments for the better.

The event is organised in collaboration with the University's Student Discipline and Resolution Team and will include an overview of provision for students at Warwick.

Wed 29 Jan, '20
-
CSWG Graduate Seminar Series - Queer relationships
S0.09 (Social Science building)

The Centre for Studies in Women and Gender are excited to announce its fifth graduate seminar session 'Queer relationships' on Wednesday 29th January 2020, 3-5 pm, S.0.09 (Social Sciences)

Refreshments will be served. No registration is required.

All students and staff are welcolme!

Fri 6 Mar, '20
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Seminar: "Anti-gender politics, masculinism and feminism: Reflections on Turkey and Europe"
Wolfson Research Exchange

Dr. Alev Özkazanç, Wolfson College, University of Oxford

Alev is a Visiting Scholar at Wolfson College, University of Oxford where she is pursuing research on anti-gender politics in Europe and Turkey with a particular focus on gender violence in authoritarian-populist regimes. She is an Emeritus Professor of Political Science and Gender Studies at Ankara University. Her published books are: The New Right and After: Writings in Political Sociology (2007), Neoliberal Appearances: Citizenship, Crime and Education (2011), Sexuality, Violence and Law (2013), Feminism and Queer Theory (2015). She has been on the editorial boards of academic journals such as Mürekkep, Toplum ve Bilim and on the supervisory committees for Fe Journal: Feminist Critique, KAOS Q+ Queer Studies, Vira Verita: Interdisciplinary Encounters, and Feminist Tahayyül.

Fri 15 May, '20
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Online Workshop: "Publishing in International Feminist Journals" (part of the Atgender Conference "Caring in Uncaring Times")

Writing articles may be the last thing you feel able or keen to do at the moment, but if you would like insight and advice on the process of publishing in international feminist journals, then join us for this workshop, aimed at postgraduate students and early career researchers. We will discuss the process of submission and peer review of articles, and how it might be affected by Covid19. We will share a set of practical writing and editing tips - what to do and what not to do. There will also be time for debate, during which you can share experiences of academic publishing, ask questions doubts and get advice.

This event is being hosted by CSWG through Zoom, as part of the conference "Caring in Uncaring Times", organised by Atgender and Middlesex University. To receive the Zoom links to join this event, please contact Dr Maria do Mar Pereira on M.D.M.Pereira@warwick.ac.uk.

Wed 3 Jun, '20
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CSWG "Work (Not?) in Progress" Seminar: Session 1 - Fieldwork and Funding
Zoom

“Work (Not?) In Progress” Sessions

An opportunity to connect and discuss

The COVID-19 crisis has impacted all of us in a number of different ways, from our emotional and mental wellbeing to productivity and how we do research. The Centre for the Study of Women and Gender (CSWG) is launching bi-weekly “Work (Not?) In Progress” sessions to informally connect and discuss issues that are affecting our community in this uncertain time.

You do not need to RSVP. The Zoom link for the session will be sent to the CSWG mailing list on the day, so please keep an eye out for that. We ask that you do not share this link beyond our mailing list due to safety.

We welcome all members of our CSWG community to these sessions. We understand many of you are juggling work with other responsibilities at the moment, so we are happy for you to join the event with children or while doing something else.

Wednesday 3rd June: Fieldwork and Funding

This session is a space for discussion on the impact of lockdown on current research and fieldwork, and on how we might conceptualise and envisage future funding applications. We will discuss the challenges we are facing in our respective projects and share strategies going forward.

Session lead: Dr Rachel O'Neill, Wellcome Fellow in the Department of Sociology whose research centres on questions of gender, subjectivity, culture and inequality.

Wed 17 Jun, '20
-
CSWG "Work (Not?) in Progress" Seminar: Session 2 - Wellbeing, Emotion, and Mental Health
Zoom

“Work (Not?) In Progress” Sessions

An opportunity to connect and discuss

The COVID-19 crisis has impacted all of us in a number of different ways, from our emotional and mental wellbeing to productivity and how we do research. The Centre for the Study of Women and Gender (CSWG) is launching bi-weekly “Work (Not?) In Progress” sessions to informally connect and discuss issues that are affecting our community in this uncertain time.

You do not need to RSVP. The Zoom link for the session will be sent to the CSWG mailing list on the day, so please keep an eye out for that. We ask that you do not share this link beyond our mailing list due to safety.

We welcome all members of our CSWG community to these sessions. We understand many of you are juggling work with other responsibilities at the moment, so we are happy for you to join the event with children or while doing something else.

Wednesday 17th June: Wellbeing, Emotion, and Mental Health

One of the most pressing issues that many of us will be facing is managing our wellbeing and mental health. Our normal strategies and wellbeing practices may be unavailable, and in these uncertain times stressors may be more impactful. Here we aim to discuss how these experiences are shaping our experiences of teaching, studying, researching and working, and to share strategies for wellbeing.

Session lead: Dr Rumana Hashem, an activist-academic, a sociologist and a feminist researcher, affiliated with the department of Politics and International Studies at the University of Warwick, and the Centre for Research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging at the University of East London.

Wed 24 Jun, '20
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CSWG Seminar: "Gendered Inequalities in times of Covid-19 - Challenges and Action"
Zoom

CSWG invites you to join a round-table seminar on gendered inequalities under Covid-19, covering a range of topics including the uneven and unequal effects of Covid-19 on different groups of women, violence, household inequalities in lockdown, and the links between Covid-19 and other threats to the rights of LGBT people and BAME women. We will be hearing from Dr Ruth Pearce, Dr Kindy Sandhu, Dr Emma Beckett, and Dr Katherine Twamley (bios below), and inviting discussion on how to practice feminist solidarity as we remain in, and gradually emerge from, lockdown.

The event will take place via Zoom. The link and password will be circulated through the CSWG mailing list on the day, so do keep an eye out for this. We ask that you do not share this link beyond the CSWG mailing list for safety, please.

Speakers:

Dr Ruth Pearce is Research Coordinator for the Trans Learning Partnership, and a visiting researcher at the Universities of Surrey and Leeds. Her work explores issues of inequality, marginalisation, power and political struggle. She will explain how trans communities are disproportionately affected by Covid-19, and explore why governments in Europe and North America have chosen this moment to propose anti-trans legislation.

Dr Kindy Sandhu started her professional life as a software engineer working on real time telecommunications systems, rising to senior management. She has worked in the public and charity sectors too; including VAWG, education and housing. Kindy is a feminist activist, trade unionist and campaigner in the areas of anti-racism, and gender equality. She is a Labour and Co-operative councillor in Coventry. Kindy authored “Layers of Inequality”, which was an intersectional study of the impact of the spending cuts on BAME women. She was a member of the research team at Women's Budget Group, on “Intersecting Inequalities”, which undertook a cumulative impact assessment of the changes to taxes, benefits and public spending since 2010 on BAME women. She holds a PhD, in the subject of domestic violence using an intersectional approach. She is currently researching the impact of the hostile environment on victims of domestic violence and their children.

Dr Emma Beckett works in domestic abuse, training primary health care professionals in recognising and responding to domestic abuse. She will be talking about Covid-19 and domestic abuse, discussing the effect that lockdown has had upon victims and how we need to think about what happens post-lockdown.

Dr Katherine Twamley is Associate Professor of Sociology in the Department of Social Science at University College London. Her research focuses on gender, love and intimacy, and family. Katherine has conducted research on the transition to parenthood, family policies (notably parental leave), understandings of love and marriage and how these intersect with understandings of ‘equality’. Her most recent project explores inter- and intra-family inequalities experienced and provoked by the COVID-19 pandemic. This project is being undertaken with colleagues Dr Charlotte Faircloth and Dr Humera Iqbal (project site here). In this brief talk, she will discuss some of the rationale around a focus on gender and care during COVID-19, as well as the emerging findings.

 

If you face any access barriers and there are any adjustments we can make to support your full participation, please get in touch with Roxanne (r.n.douglas@warwick.ac.uk). Do also get in touch with Roxanne (r.n.douglas@warwick.ac.uk) if you have any questions about this event.

Fri 26 Jun, '20
-
CSWG Film Screening & discussion '3 Hours to Love'
Zoom

3 Hours to Love follows four intersecting stories about women who reflect on their circumstances inside the Special Prison Facility of Santa Cruz do Bispo, Portugal, where time is set by the daily routines.

As we emerge from lockdown, this might invite reconsiderations of social isolation, time, and incarceration, and on the role of imprisonment in society. We will screen the film via zoom with time for discussion and comments afterwards, which may include themes about the marking of time in prison, emotional and physical isolation, communication, and family structures, and the role of imprisonment. 

The film’s director, Patrícia Nogueira, will be joining us to discuss the making of the film and its connection to isolation during lockdown. Patrícia Nogueira is a Portuguese documentary filmmaker, producing and directing her own documentaries and working regularly in other directors’ films, both documentary and fiction. Documentary was the way she chose to express herself about the surrounding world and her inner concerns. She likes to deeply know people, try to understand them, create a relationship and give them a voice. In her first feature documentary, 3 Hours to Love, Patricia pursues her favourite topic and tries to engage audiences through women’s emotions and sexuality. She usually says, “It’s a feminine film from a feminine point of view.” The film won the award for Best Documentary at Viana do Castelo Cinema Meetings (2013) and was officially selected for DocLisboa (2013), Cine Las Americas (2014), FEST (2014), and Berlin Feminist Film Week (2015).

You do not need to RSVP. The Zoom link for the session will be sent to the CSWG mailing list on the day, so please keep an eye out for that. We ask that you do not share this link beyond our mailing list due to safety.

If you face any access barriers and there are any adjustments we can make to support your full participation, please get in touch with Roxanne (r.n.douglas@warwick.ac.uk). Do also get in touch with Roxanne (r.n.douglas@warwick.ac.uk) if you have any questions about this event.

Tue 30 Jun, '20
-
CSWG Social: 'Femigami' Workshop
Zoom

“Femigami specialises in hosting playful & thought-provoking workshops using the traditional art of origami to create unconventional paper creations; facilitating conversations around body image and feminism. In this 40-minute workshop you’ll learn to make feminist icons, self-love envelopes & butterflies using materials that you can find at home. All ages welcome!”

What you’ll need:

  • 6 squares of paper – any scrap/magazine paper will do (approx. 15cm x 15cm)
  • Pen/ biro or felt-tip
  • Wool, glue and decorations (optional)

This event is free, but ‘Femigami’ workshops are in aid of fundraising for Women’s Aid, which you can donate to here if you wish to: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/femigami

You do not need to RSVP. The Zoom link for the session will be sent to the CSWG mailing list on the day, so please keep an eye out for that. We ask that you do not share this link beyond our mailing list due to safety.

If you face any access barriers and there are any adjustments we can make to support your full participation, please get in touch with Roxanne (r.n.douglas@warwick.ac.uk). Do also get in touch with Roxanne (r.n.douglas@warwick.ac.uk) if you have any questions about this event.

Wed 8 Jul, '20
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CSWG "Work (Not?) in Progress" Seminar: Session 3 - Career Progression
Zoom

“Work (Not?) In Progress” Sessions

An opportunity to connect and discuss

The COVID-19 crisis has impacted all of us in a number of different ways, from our emotional and mental wellbeing to productivity and how we do research. The Centre for the Study of Women and Gender (CSWG) is launching bi-weekly “Work (Not?) In Progress” sessions to informally connect and discuss issues that are affecting our community in this uncertain time.

You do not need to RSVP. The Zoom link for the session will be sent to the CSWG mailing list on the day, so please keep an eye out for that. We ask that you do not share this link beyond our mailing list due to safety.

We welcome all members of our CSWG community to these sessions. We understand many of you are juggling work with other responsibilities at the moment, so we are happy for you to join the event with children or while doing something else.

Wednesday 8th July: Career progression

There have already been articles in the news about how the Covid crisis is generating a gender disparity in publication output. This session is a space to discuss the ways that the current climate has impacted publications, workloads and expectations, career progression, and applications, and strategies to manage some of these challenges.

Session lead: Dr Khursheed Wadia: Dr Wadia has researched and written extensively on gender and political participation and civic engagement and also on gender and policy, focusing on women from racialised minorities in the UK and France.

Wed 15 Jul, '20
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CSWG "Work (Not?) in Progress" Seminar: Session 4 - Working Conditions
Zoom

“Work (Not?) In Progress” Sessions

An opportunity to connect and discuss

The COVID-19 crisis has impacted all of us in a number of different ways, from our emotional and mental wellbeing to productivity and how we do research. The Centre for the Study of Women and Gender (CSWG) is launching bi-weekly “Work (Not?) In Progress” sessions to informally connect and discuss issues that are affecting our community in this uncertain time.

You do not need to RSVP. The Zoom link for the session will be sent to the CSWG mailing list on the day, so please keep an eye out for that. We ask that you do not share this link beyond our mailing list due to safety.

We welcome all members of our CSWG community to these sessions. We understand many of you are juggling work with other responsibilities at the moment, so we are happy for you to join the event with children or while doing something else.

Wednesday 15th July: Working Conditions

Now that many of us are “working from home”, our productivity may be impacted by factors such as caring, noise, loneliness, being surrounded by too many people or not enough people, (lack of) work space, managing time, managing and delivering teaching online, headspace and mental loads. It is also now emerging that the expectations and contractual working conditions are changing and possibly being contested. This is a space to discuss how these and other factors surrounding working conditions, and what we mean by “working conditions”, are affecting the CSWG community, and to share working and campaigning strategies.

Fri 18 Sep, '20
-
CSWG Workshop: "Covid-19, Feminist Academia and Social Justice Issues"
Microsoft Teams

This online roundtable event aims to highlight and think through the existing gender inequalities which have been exacerbated by the Covid-19 pandemic and lockdown. It will focus on issues around domestic violence/violence against women and girls; disability and mental health; and state power and community-based violence as they impact Black, Asian and migrant women, in addition to women seeking asylum. The event will also tie issues around feminist scholarship and campaign work to Covid-19 and its adverse impacts. We hope that, by addressing the struggles of those most vulnerable in this current moment, the event will foster crucial dialogue and collaboration between feminist scholars, activists, and organisations, in order to inform mobilisation and resistance on the ground.

 

Speakers include (further speakers to be confirmed):

 

• Shabana Kausar (Violence against women and girls tri-borough Strategic Lead)

• Dorothea Jones (The Monitoring Group)

• Dr Vicky Canning (Senior Lecturer in Criminology, University of Bristol)

• Gemma Williams (Doctoral Candidate, Birmingham City University)

 

The event is free to attend but spaces are limited. We also ask that attendees consider kindly donating £1, £3 or £5 or becoming a member of the FSA, as your generosity or membership helps to ensure that we can continue our work as a not for profit network in this increasingly difficult socio-economic climate.

 

The event will include the option to enable live captions and subtitles. If you have additional questions or requirements around accessibility, please get in touch on contact@the-fsa.co.uk

Wed 28 Oct, '20
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CSWG Graduate Seminar: Gender-based Violence
Zoom Meeting ID: 875 7765 5412 Password: 028591
Wed 4 Nov, '20
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CSWG "Work (Not?) in Progress" Seminar 1: "The Challenges of Doing Feminist and Queer Pedagogies in a Pandemic"
Zoom

Work (Not?) In Progress” Sessions – the TEACHING edition

The Covid-19 crisis has impacted our working lives and working practices in profound ways. To help make sense of, and manage, those impacts, the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender (CSWG) launched earlier this year a series of “Work (Not?) In Progress” sessions where staff and students got together to informally connect and discuss their experiences of those impacts.

Last term, the WNIP sessions focused on the impacts of Covid-19 on research, but this term we will turn our attention to the impacts of Covid-19 on TEACHING.

In this first session, we will focus on the Challenges of Doing Feminist and Queer Pedagogies in a Pandemic. Feminist and queer approaches to pedagogy invite us to develop teaching that is interactive, inclusive, participatory, transformative, experiential, embodied and uses space differently. But how do you do this in a pandemic, learning online or in face masks? Cath Lambert (Sociology) will kickstart our discussion of the multiple challenges of doing feminist and queer pedagogies in times of Covid-19.

We will be meeting on Zoom. Please use the following details to join us:

The event is open to all staff and students at Warwick and beyond. This is an informal space for connection and discussion, so please feel free to bring your lunch and eat with us during the meeting.

The session is pet- and child-friendly, so other members of your household are welcome to join us too.

If you face any access barriers and there are any adjustments we can make to support your full participation, or you have any questions about the event, please get in touch with Maria (m.d.m.pereira@warwick.ac.uk).

Wed 25 Nov, '20
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CSWG "Work (Not?) in Progress" Seminar 2: "Emotions and Connections in the Socially Distanced Classroom"
Zoom

Work (Not?) In Progress” Sessions – the TEACHING edition

The Covid-19 crisis has impacted our working lives and working practices in profound ways. To help make sense of, and manage, those impacts, the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender (CSWG) launched earlier this year a series of “Work (Not?) In Progress” sessions where staff and students got together to informally connect and discuss their experiences of those impacts.

Last term, the WNIP sessions focused on the impacts of Covid-19 on research, but this term we will turn our attention to the impacts of Covid-19 on TEACHING.

The topic of this session will be

“Emotions and Connections in the Socially Distanced Classroom”.
Critical approaches to pedagogy invite us to develop connected teaching that engages creatively and reflexively with emotions. But how do you do this in a socially distanced classroom, learning online or in face masks? Roxanne Douglas (English and Comparative Literary Studies) will kickstart our discussion.

We will be meeting on Zoom. Please use the following details to join the session.

The event is open to all staff and students at Warwick and beyond. This is an informal space for connection and discussion, so please feel free to bring your lunch and eat with us during the meeting.

The session is pet- and child-friendly, so other members of your household are welcome to join us too.

If you face any access barriers and there are any adjustments we can make to support your full participation, or you have any questions about the event, please get in touch with Maria (m.d.m.pereira@warwick.ac.uk).

Wed 2 Dec, '20
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CSWG Graduate Seminar: Intersectionality in Social Movements
Meeting ID: 858 0211 0240 Passcode: 136859
Wed 9 Dec, '20
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CSWG Graduate Seminar: Negotiating Medical Body Presentations
Zoom
Wed 20 Jan, '21
-
CSWG Graduate Seminar: Negotiating Aesthetic Presentations of The Body
Zoom

Meeting ID: 879 4442 9098

Passcode: 216952

Thu 4 Feb, '21
-
CSWG Public Lecture: Prof. Hazel Carby - “Imperial Sexual Economies: Enslaved and Free Women of Color on a Jamaican Coffee Plantation, 1800-1834”
Online - Link to be confirmed

Professor Hazel V. Carby is the Charles C. and Dorothea S. Dilley Professor Emeritus of African American Studies and Professor Emeritus of American Studies Yale University and a Fellow of the Royal Society for the Arts.

She is the author of Imperial Intimacies, A Tale of Two Islands (Verso, 2019) selected as one of the “Books of the Year for 2019,” by the Times Literary Supplement. Winner of the British Academy’s Nayef Al-Rodhan Prize for Global Cultural Understanding, 2020, Finalist John Hope Franklin Publication Prize, ASA, 2020, and Shortlisted for the PEN Hessell-Tiltman Prize, 2020.

Imperial Intimacies is a history of empire, told through one woman’s search through generations of family stories. It moves between Jamaican plantations, the countryside of Devon, the port cities of Bristol, Cardiff and Kingston, and the working-class estates of South London. It is an intimate personal history and a sweeping summation of the violent entanglements of two islands. It charts the British empire’s interweaving of capital and bodies, public language and private feeling.

Dr Meleisa Ono-George (History) and Dr Hannah Jones (Sociology) will act as discussants for Professor Hazel Carby.

REGISTRATION:

This lecture is free and everyone is welcome, but you must register in advance by clicking here.

 

We understand many of you are juggling work with other responsibilities at home, so we are happy for you to join the event with children or pets.

If you face any access barriers and there are any adjustments we can make to support your full participation, please get in touch with Prof Nickie Charles (nickie.charles@warwick.ac.uk).

f you have any questions about the event, please contact Prof Nickie Charles (nickie.charles@warwick.ac.uk).  

Thu 25 Feb, '21
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CSWG Seminar: "Gender, Displacement and Feminist Methodologies: Researching Border Struggles of Women and LGBTQ Migrants"
Zoom

Gender, Displacement and Feminist Methodologies: Researching Border Struggles of Women and LGBTQ Migrants

This webinar offers a panel of three presentations by feminist ethnographers in sociology and anthropology from India, Italy and Bangladesh. The researchers will present from their doctoral and post-doctoral research on how refugee policy is gendered in India, Italy and the UK, how women and LGBTQI migrants from the global South respond to such policies, and how we can use their narratives of border struggles ethically without producing epistemic violence. The papers focus on three feminist studies in migration and refugee studies: one doctoral study with Mediterranean migrant women and LGBTQI lived experiences in Italian border, one postdoctoral research with LGBTQ asylum-seekers and undocumented migrant women in the UK, and one doctoral study with Afghan women refugees in Delhi (India).

Chair: Dr Stavroula Tsirogianni, Senior Lecturer in Sociology, Chinese University of Hongkong and Shenzen, China

Papers:

  • "Migrant women’s ways out of violence: drawing a feminist ethnography at the eastern border of Italy" - Veronica Saba, University of Trieste. Italy
  • "Studying gendered borders: Challenges in narrating ordeals of undocumented women and LGBTQ-asylum seekers in higher education in Britain" - Rumana Hashem, Rights Lab, University of Nottingham, UK
  • "An ethnography of everyday life: The ethics and quandaries of feminist research with Afghan refugee women in Delhi" - Nithya Rajan, University of Minnesota, US

REGISTRATION:

This workshop is free and everyone is welcome, but you must register in advance by clicking here.

We welcome all students, staff and the general public to our events. We understand many of you are juggling work with other responsibilities at home, so we are happy for you to join the event with children or pets.

If you face any access barriers and there are any adjustments we can make to support your full participation, please indicate them in the relevant section of the registration form. If you have any questions or concerns, please get in touch with Dr Maria do Mar Pereira (m.d.m.pereira@warwick.ac.uk).

 

Wed 3 Mar, '21
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CSWG Graduate Seminar: Criminalising Gender
Zoom Meeting ID: 891 0069 2970 Passcode: 423871
Wed 10 Mar, '21
-
CSWG Graduate Seminar: Cultures of Sex in Educational Contexts
Zoom Meeting ID: 837 8657 8908 Passcode: 216409
Thu 25 Mar, '21
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Panel: "The Right to the City - Global Feminist Approaches"
Zoom

Jointly hosted by the Centre for Feminist Research, Goldsmiths, University of London & the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender, University of Warwick.

Panellists:

  • Nirmal Puwar (Chair/Organiser)
  • Phoebe Kisubi Mbasalaki - Reflecting on the #AMINEXT uprising in South Africa.
  • Helena Suárez Val - Indignant, sad and fierce
  • Adrija Dey - The right to the Campus: universities as sites of repression & counter-struggle in India

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Our streets are activated by the right to be in the city; to protest, to walk and exist without harassment. Different forms of vigilant surveillance beset bodies ‘marked’ as being out of place. Rambling anywhere and at any time is reserved for specific bodies. The right to be in public spaces is punctured daily through legal powers and forms of exclusionary citizenship, as well as everyday micro modes of measurement and dis/possession. Localised events can ignite daily lived tensions to breaking point, galvanising a force to contest repeated forms of overlooked modes of violence. This panel of speakers will consider the social and political right to the city being forged both locally and globally; including discussion of South Africa, India and Uruguay and the UK.

FREE. ALL WELCOME.

Please register for a free ticket to receive a Zoom link on the day: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-right-to-the-city-global-feminist-approaches-tickets-146913180277

If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to email Chloe Turner - c.turner@gold.ac.uk

 

Panellist Bios:

Nirmal Puwar is Co-Director of the Centre for Feminist Research at Goldsmiths, University of London and Visiting Fellow of Centre for the Study of Women and Gender University of Warwick. She has a longstanding interest in bodies and space, her book Space Invaders: race, gender and bodies out of place (2004), generated a conceptual frame work. She co-leads the strand on Space Invading in the Global Grace project on Gender and Cultural Equalities. Her work brings together a range of methods and site-specific interventions to re-route space, nation and institutions, including Noise of the Past through Call-and-Response. At Goldsmiths she co-founded the Methods Lab to mutate methods as well as outside/inside relations within and beyond the walls of the academy. Live Methods, co-edited with Les Back, is one of eighteen collections she has co-edited.

Phoebe Kisubi Mbasalak is a post-doctoral research fellow on the GlobalGRACE project (https://www.globalgrace.net) housed at the AGI and the Centre for Theatre, Dance and Performance Studies (CTDPS) – University of Cape Town as well as the NGO – Sex Workers Advocacy and Educational Task Force (SWEAT). She is also a lecturer on the gender studies program at the Africa Gender Institute (AGI) – University of Cape Town. She holds a doctorate in Gender Studies from Utrecht University in the Netherlands, supervised by Prof. Gloria Wekker. Her research interests are in critical race, gender, class, sexuality, public health as well as decolonial thought and praxis.

Helena Suárez Val is a Latin American activist, researcher and social communications producer with a focus on feminism and human rights. She currently works independently, having previously worked with Amnesty International, the Global Call for Action against Poverty (GCAP) and Uruguayan feminist collective Cotidiano Mujer, amongst others. She holds an MA in Gender, Media and Culture from Goldsmiths and is pursuing a PhD at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies, University of Warwick. In 2015, she started Feminicidio Uruguay (feminicidiouruguay.net), a database and map of feminicide cases in the country. She is currently collaborating with Catherine D'Ignazio and Silvana Fumega on an international participatory action research project, Data Against Feminicide.

Adrija Dey is currently a Lecturer in Digital Media at the University of Sussex. Her post doctoral research looked at Sexual and Gender Based Violence in Indian Universities. She is also part of the 1752 groups, Account for This, Alliance of Women in Academia and other campaigns in the UK and India fighting against gendered violence in higher education.

Tue 18 May, '21
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CSWG Seminar: Dr Akane Kanai - “Online Feminisms and Online Knowledge Cultures”
Zoom

“Online Feminisms and Online Knowledge Cultures”

a talk by Dr Akane Kanai (Monash University)

Tuesday, May 18th
from 10.00 to 11.30 (UK time) (to convert this to your own time-zone, please click here)

Abstract
In recent times we have seen a rise in concerns on how to act ‘ethically’ as a political subject. In agonisations over how to ‘use one’s platform’ appropriately and how to engage with problematic public figures, artists, creators, there are significant anxieties over one’s authority to know, how to make claims and dispute them. These difficulties take place in a context of heightened affective-discursive attempts to ‘de-authorise’ feminist and antiracist claims at the same time that feminist and antiracist thought has gained significant momentum in its circulation and takeup online. In these events, social media has been noted to play an essential part in heightening the stakes of personal action. In this paper, I reflect on some projects on online and mediated feminism in the context of ongoing feminist debates about truth claims and the place of the personal in relation to the political. I suggest that we might productively approach and understand these concerns by thinking through online political cultures as ‘knowledge cultures’ (Knorr Cetina 1997; 2007) in which attempts to find ‘epistemic community’ are yet unresolved.

Speaker Bio
Dr Akane Kanai is a lecturer in the School of Media, Film and Journalism at Monash University. Her research areas include gender, race, and the politics of affect and identity online and in popular culture. In 2021, she was awarded an Australian Research Council fellowship to explore the everyday uses of online feminism by young women.

 

REGISTRATION:
This talk is free and everyone is welcome, but you must REGISTER IN ADVANCE by clicking HERE.
Once you register, you will receive the Zoom link via email a few days before the event.

We understand many of you are juggling work with other responsibilities at home, so we are happy for you to join the event with children or pets.

If you face any access barriers and there are any adjustments we can make to support your full participation, please get in touch with Dr Maria do Mar Pereira (m.d.m.pereira@warwick.ac.uk).

 

If you have any questions about the event, please contact Dr Maria do Mar Pereira (m.d.m.pereira@warwick.ac.uk).

Thu 17 Jun, '21
-
Teach-In: "Decoloniality, Solidarity & the Question of Palestine"
Zoom

This teach-in, organised by the Social Theory Centre and co-hosted by CSWG, aims to deepen understanding of what is happening in Palestine by placing events in a longer historical context.

Israel's 11-day bombardment of the Gaza strip in May once again brought public attention to the most visible forms of oppression and violence to which Palestinians are subjected. The aim of this teach-in is to deepen understanding of what is happening in Palestine by placing events in a longer historical context of settler-colonialism, dispossession, resistance and mobilisation.

The speakers will also critically assess the ways in which Palestine has been framed in Western academia, highlighting the need for a decolonial and emancipatory engagement with Palestine as a global struggle for justice and liberation.

Speakers

  • Hadeel Himmo, student, University of Warwick - Censoring Palestine
  • Ashjan Ajour, Researcher, University of Leicester - A view from Gaza
  • Muna Dajani, Senior Research Associate, Lancaster Environment Centre - Decolonising the Question of Palestine
  • Marwan Darweish, Associate Professor, Center for Trust, Peace & Social Relations, University of Coventry - A history of Palestinian popular resistance

Moderator: Nicola Pratt, Reader, Department of Politics and International Studies, University of Warwick.

Indicative Readings

This event is open to all. You can register through this Eventbrite page.

Mon 28 Jun, '21
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CSWG Seminar: Gabriela Loureiro - “Emotions, hashtag feminism and consciousness-raising: a history of feminist radicalness and co-option”
Zoom

“Emotions, hashtag feminism and consciousness-raising: a history of feminist radicalness and co-option”

a talk by Gabriela Loureiro (University of West London; Queen Mary - University of London)

Monday, June 28th
from 12.00 to 1.30 (UK time) (to convert this to your own time-zone, please click here)

Abstract
Feminist hashtags have received significant attention from both mainstream media and scholarly debates for its capacity to engage large numbers of people in curated conversations about sexual violence, where personal disclosures can be read relationally. Hashtag feminism has been interpreted as a form of digital consciousness-raising where participants are understood as engaging in campaigns in order to raise awareness and educate individuals about varied forms of violence. However, these digital campaigns also replicate challenges and problems historically present in feminist activism, such as conflicts of difference and biased “solidarities”. The reproduction of such problems demonstrates how hashtag feminism is not necessarily a frivolous, depoliticised form of activism but actually mirrors a number of intersecting and conflicting histories of feminisms’ radicalness and co-option. I argue that the study of emotions in feminist activism is essential to the understanding of the continuation of these problems and explore the role of emotions in feminist campaigns in three main axes: recognition of discrimination and abuse, speaking out and building solidarity. In this talk, I will share part of the analysis of my PhD thesis, in which I examine two hashtags that went viral in Brazil in 2015, named the “year of Women’s Spring”: #PrimeiroAssédio (#FirstHarassment) and #MeuAmigoSecreto (#MySecretFriend). Through discourse analysis of 179 Facebook posts and in-depth interviews with participants, I explore the significance of emotional engagements for feminist projects and the potentials and limitations of hashtag feminism for consciousness-raising.

Speaker Bio
Gabriela Loureiro is a journalist and doctoral researcher at UWL primarily interested in the intersections of gender, sexuality, race, and migration. She works as a research associate at Queen Mary University of London in the School of Geography’s project Connecting During Covid (CDC), looking at migrant’s remittances as practices of care during the pandemic. Her PhD thesis, entitled “Embodied emotions and collective struggle: hashtag feminism as digital consciousness-raising in Brazil”, examines the emotional work of online disclosure in digital feminist campaigns. Her academic publications revolve around contemporary forms of feminist activism in Brazil, the legacy of Marielle Franco and the connections between embodiment, therapy and art in digital spaces.

 

REGISTRATION:
This talk is free and everyone is welcome, but you must REGISTER IN ADVANCE by clicking HERE.
Once you register, you will receive the Zoom link via email a few days before the event.

We understand many of you are juggling work with other responsibilities at home, so we are happy for you to join the event with children or pets.

If you face any access barriers and there are any adjustments we can make to support your full participation, please get in touch with Dr Maria do Mar Pereira (m.d.m.pereira@warwick.ac.uk).

 

If you have any questions about the event, please contact Dr Maria do Mar Pereira (m.d.m.pereira@warwick.ac.uk).