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Professor Ian Brunton-Smith

I joined the Department of Sociology as a professor in sociology and quantitative methods in 2016, having previously worked at the University of Surrey. My current research interests include various areas of criminology, multilevel modelling, and survey methodology.

I am director of the Warwick Qstep centre and provide statistical methods training at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. I am also secretary of the Royal Statistical Society Social Statistics Committee and sit on the editorial board of the British Journal of Criminology.

Curriculum Vitae


The main areas of research that I am currently involved in are:

PRISON EFFECTS
This work explores the impact of prison experience on reoffending and employment amongst a cohort of nearly 4,000 prisoners using survey data from the Surveying Prisoner Crime Reduction (SPCR) survey linked to the Police National Computer. This includes the application of multilevel models to adjust for prison context, and longitudinal models to examine changes in prisoner experience and attitudes over time.

Key findings from this work can be found in:
McCarthy, D., and Brunton-Smith, I. (forthcoming) 'The effect of penal legitimacy on prisoners' post-release desistance'. Crime and Delinquency.

Brunton-Smith, I., and McCarthy, D. (online first) 'The effects of prisoner attachment to family on re-entry outcomes: A longitudinal assessment' British Journal of Criminology.

Brunton-Smith, I., and McCarthy, D. (2016) 'Prison legitimacy and procedural fairness: the view from prisoners across England and Wales' Justice Quarterly. 33(6): 1029-1054.

Brunton-Smith, I., and Hopkins, K. (2014) 'The impact of experience in prison on the employment status of prisoners after release: Findings from the first 3 waves of Surveying Prisoner Crime Reduction (SPCR)' Report for Ministry of Justice.

Hopkins, K., and Brunton-Smith, I. (2014) 'Prisoners' experience of prison and outcomes on release: Results from Surveying Prisoner Crime Reduction (SPCR)' Report for Ministry of Justice.

Brunton-Smith, I., and Hopkins, K. (2013) 'The factors associated with reconviction following release from prison: Findings from the first 3 waves of Surveying Prisoner Crime Reduction (SPCR)' Report for Ministry of Justice.

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THE ROLE OF NEIGHBOURHOOD CONTEXT
I am particularly interested in the potential impact that neighbourhood context has in shaping local residents perceptions. This has involved the application of multilevel models to crime survey data in order to identify the contribution of neighbourhood context, and combining this with contextual information from the census of England and Wales.

Key findings from this work can be found in:
Brunton-Smith, I., Sutherland, A., and Jackson, J. (2014) 'Bridging structure and perception; On the social ecology of beliefs and worries about neighbourhood violence in London' British Journal of Criminology. 54(4): 503-526.

Sturgis, P., Brunton-Smith, I., Jackson, J., and Kuha, J. (2014) 'Ethnic diversity and the social cohesion of neighbourhoods in London' Ethnic and Racial Studies, 37(8): 1286-1309.

Sutherland, A., Brunton-Smith., I., and Jackson, J. (2013) 'Collective efficacy, deprivation and violence in London' British Journal of Criminology, 53(6): 1050-1074.

Brunton-Smith, I., and Sturgis, P. (2011) 'Do Neighborhoods Generate Fear of Crime?: An Empirical Test Using the British Crime Survey' Criminology, 49(2): 331-369.

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METHODOLOGY
My research within the field of survey methodology focuses specifically on the potential contribution that interviewers make to estimates of measurement error in face to face surveys. This is examined with the application of cross-classified multilevel models with a complex error structure to face to face survey data. I have also been involved in work looking at the potential for interviewer observation data collected during the interview to adjust survey estimates for nonresponse bias, as well as the potential for panel conditioning effects in longitudinal surveys. More recently I have been applying multiple imputation models to survey data with high attrition, including data with a multilevel structure.

Key findings from this work can be found in:
Brunton-Smith, I., Sturgis, P., and Leckie, G. (online first) 'Detecting and understanding interviewer effects on survey data by using a cross-classified mixed effects location-scale model' Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series A.

Williams, J., Sturgis, P., Brunton-Smith, I., and Moore, J. (online first) 'Fieldwork effort, response rate and the distribution of survey outcomes: a multi-level meta-analysis' Public Opinion Quarterly.

Brunton-Smith, I., Carpenter, J., Kenward, M., and Tarling, R. (2014) 'Multiple Imputation for handling missing data in social research' Social Research Update, no 65.

Brunton-Smith, I., Carpenter, J., Kenward, M., and Tarling, R. (2014) 'Surveying Prisoner Crime Reduction (SPCR) Using multiple imputation to recover missing data from the SPCR' Report for Ministry of Justice.

Brunton-Smith, I., Sturgis, P., and Williams, J. (2012) 'Is success on the doorstep correlated with the magnitude of the interviewer design effect?' Public Opinion Quarterly, 76(2): 265-286.

CURRENT TEACHING

IM911: Quantitative Research Methods (Thursdays 10-1)

QS301: Advanced Quantitative Methods (Fridays 9-12)