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Flexible solar cells a step closer to reality

Solar cells that use mixtures of organic molecules to absorb sunlight and convert it to electricity, that can be applied to curved surfaces such as the body of a car, could be a step closer thanks to a discovery that challenges conventional thinking about one of the key components of these devices.

Wed 11 Sep 2019, 14:02 | Tags: research, Chemistry, solar power

Greener, faster and cheaper way to make patterned metals for solar cells and electronics

An innovative way to pattern metals has been discovered by scientists in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Warwick, which could make the next generation of solar panels more sustainable and cheaper.

Wed 14 Aug 2019, 09:00 | Tags: Chemistry, solar power, metals

‘Deforming’ solar cells could be clue to improved efficiency

Solar panelsSolar cells and light sensing technologies could be made more efficient by taking advantage of an unusual property due to deformations and defects in their structures.

Mon 29 Jul 2019, 11:24 | Tags: Physics, research, solar power

New research could literally squeeze more power out of solar cells

Physicists at the University of Warwick have today, Thursday 19th April 2018, published new research in the Journal Science today 19th April 2018 (via the Journal’s First Release pages) that could literally squeeze more power out of solar cells by physically deforming each of the crystals in the semiconductors used by photovoltaic cells. The paper entitled the “Flexo-Photovoltaic Effect” was written by Professor Marin Alexe, Ming-Min Yang, and Dong Jik Kim who are all based in the University of Warwick’s Department of Physics.

Fri 20 Apr 2018, 09:08 | Tags: Physics, solar power

More electronic materials opened up with new metal-organic framework

More materials for electronic applications could be identified, thanks to the discovery of a new metal-organic framework (MOF) that displays electrical semiconduction with a record high photoresponsivity, by a global research collaboration involving the University of Warwick.


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