Skip to main content

CH3F3 - Advanced Chemistry (Organic, Inorganic and Physical)

  • Module code: CH3F3
  • Module name: Advanced Chemistry (Organic, Inorganic and Physical)
  • Department: Chemistry
  • Credit: 30

Content and teaching | Assessment | Availability

Module content and teaching

Principal aims

This module contains the taught lecture elements of CH3F1, CH3E9 and CH3F0 combined. It does not contain any laboratory components of these modules and is designed to be taken by students undertaking placements. PHYSICAL: This module provides an introduction to two advanced topics in physical chemistry; molecular modelling and interfacial chemistry. First, this module will develop students' knowledge of the properties of surfaces and interfaces, and the methods available for characterizing them. Here, students will be introduced to the physical chemistry of a range of surface and interfacial processes, including both solid and liquid interfaces, as well as experimental methods such as atomic force microscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy. A significant aspect of this module is to demonstrate the importance of surfaces processes in chemistry and the borders of chemical engineering, biomedical science, materials science and physics. Second, students will be introduced to basic concepts in molecular modelling, focussing on molecular dynamics simulations using empirical force-fields. Starting from the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, this part of the module will cover the basics of molecular dynamics simulations, including periodic boundaries, integration algorithms, and implementation of different thermodynamic ensembles. As well as providing a firm grounding in the theoretical basis of molecular dynamics simulations, this module will also emphasize what properties can be calculated, and the connection between molecular dynamics and statistical mechanics. A common theme which runs throughout these two parts of the module will be the use of computation to help interpret experimental data. This will be emphasized in both parts of the module through a range of examples taken from recent literature. ORGANIC: The objective of this module is to provide the students with the information they need to be able to determine the products from complex pericyclic reactions, intramolecular cyclisation processes, rearrangement reactions of reactive intermediates, and reactions creating new stereogenic centres by either substrate, reagent, or catalyst control. By the end of the module students will be able to predict the products arising from reactions. Be familiar with the empirical rules and models related to concerted, cyclisation, rearrangement, and stereoselective reactions. Student should be able to use their knowledge to devise syntheses of complex molecules. INORGANIC: The module aims to give an advanced background to the issues which impact on industrial catalytic reactions. Organometallic chemistry uses principles from organic and inorganic (particularly coordination) chemistry, and also physical chemistry (particularly kinetics). Inorganic materials chemistry uses principles from inorganic chemistry (structures of solids) and physical chemistry (electronic properties of solids). The module draws together aspects of this work developed in Year 2 and extends it to the types of reactions and catalysis used widely in chemical industries (petrochemicals, polymers, fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals).

Principal learning outcomes

PHYSICAL SECTION: After taking this module, students will have a firm understanding of core topics in both molecular modelling and surface chemistry. With regards to molecular modelling, students who complete this module will have a good understanding of the theory behind molecular dynamics simulations and empirical force-fields, as well as an appreciation of what sorts of research questions can be addressed by molecular simulation. Students will also gain hands-on experience of running molecular dynamics simulations in order to further reinforce these learning outcomes (N/A for F108/F128 Ind Training 12 month placement students) Students will also gain a strong appreciation of the importance and scope of interfacial chemistry, including wet interfaces and surfaces in ultrahigh vacuum, as well as the experimental methods which are used to study such systems; both foundational material and contemporary topics will be covered. The aim is to develop a broad understanding of the chemistry of surfaces and interfaces, so that students will be able to follow-up any particular topic if they wish to in the future. ORGANIC SECTION: The objective of this module is to provide the students with the information they need to be able to determine the products from complex pericyclic reactions, intramolecular cyclisation processes (particularly radical processes), and rearrangement reactions of reactive intermediates and to understand how reactive intermediates can used in organic synthetic transformations. In addition this course extends this knowledge to the more complex and challenging area of stereoselective and asymmetric synthesis, which refers to the specific three dimensional shape and structure of specific target molecules. By the end of this course, students shall understand how to control the absolute and relative configuration of organic molecules during their synthesis. By the end of the module students will be able to predict the products arising from reactions mediated by these reactive intermediates. Identify the type of reactive intermediate mediating a particular organic transformation. Be familiar with the empirical rules and models related to concerted, cyclisation and rearrangement reactions. Understand the key issues of stereochemical control associated with organic synthesis. Use their knowledge to devise syntheses of complex molecules. INORGANIC SECTION: Building on their knowledge of inorganic chemistry from Year 1 and Year 2, students will understand how results from academic research in catalysis, including organometallic chemistry and solid-state materials chemistry, are used in industrial applications.

Timetabled teaching activities

60 hrs lectures 17 hrs workshops (N/A F108 and F128 Ind Training 12 month placement students) 3 hrs computer workshop

Departmental link

http://go.warwick.ac.uk/CH3F3

Other essential notes

Pre-requisites: CH249, CH264, CH267

Module assessment

Assessment group Assessment name Percentage
30 CATS (Module code: CH3F3-30)
B (Examination only) Examination - March 33.4%
Examination - March 33.4%
Examination - March 33.4%

Module availability

This module is available on the following courses:

Core
  • Undergraduate Master of Chemistry Variants (F106) - Year 3
  • Undergraduate MChem Chemistry with Industrial Training (F108) - Year 3
  • Undergraduate Master of Chemistry Variants (F126) - Year 3
  • Undergraduate MChem Chemistry with Medicinal Chemistry with Industrial Training (F128) - Year 3
Optional Core

N/A

Optional

N/A