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Driver Health Policy

There are a number of health conditions, symptoms and medications which affect consciousness, attention or physical ability to control a vehicle which would affect a person’s ability to drive safely temporarily or longer term.

It is the personal legal responsibility of anyone driving on University business to ensure that they are fit to drive their vehicle, that they comply with DVLA medical standards for drivers, and that they do not drive or attempt to drive whilst unfit through medication, drugs or alcohol.

The University recognises that it also has duties of care to manage risks to the health and safety of employees driving on University business and to others who could be adversely affected by those driving on University business.

All staff engaged in the activities listed below as part of their job are subject to health screening by the University’s Occupational Health Service who will apply Driver Medical Standards as set out in the Guide issued by the Drivers Medical Group of the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Authority, DVLA:

The following are ranked in terms of the importance of their health on their fitness to drive.

Category of Driver University of Warwick Health Standard
  • Use of own or hire car on University business.
Confirmation that holds a current DVLA Group 1 licence. Assessment against DVLA Group 1 Medical Standard following involvement in a road traffic incident when on University business.
  • High mileage drivers on University business (primarily able to manage their own driving schedule).
  • Driver of small vans or small electrically powered vehicles.
Assessment against DVLA Group 1 Medical Standard at onset of appointment, thereafter every 5 years, and following any significant illness, accident or sickness absence; including importance of reporting health issues that may affect their driving ability.
  • Drivers of specialist vehicles such as forklift trucks, tractors, and ride on machinery
Each person’s fitness for operating such vehicles to be judged individually. The underlying approach should be to match the requirements of the particular driving task with the fitness and abilities of the driver. For most work a standard equivalent to that of the Group I entitlement will be appropriate. In some cases, for example working in a particularly demanding environment, working at night, or operation of large, heavy vehicles, some or all of the Group 2 medical standards may be appropriate. They should be assessed at the onset of employment to ensure they meet the necessary health standard and their health status reviewed as specified by Occupational Health.
  • Chauffeurs (unsocial hours, long distances, deadlines)
  • Occasional drivers of minibuses (number of passengers, long distance, distracting / unruly passengers)
Individual risk assessment of fitness to drive and following any significant illness, accident or sickness absence by the University’s Occupational Health Physician based on the DVLA Group 1 medical standard and taking account of mileage driven and work rotas.
  • Drivers of a Group 2 Vehicle on University business.
  • Regular drivers of minibuses
Individual risk assessment of fitness to drive initially and at least every 5 years and following any significant illness, accident or sickness absence by the University’s Occupational Health Physician based on the DVLA Group 2 medical standard.

Individual driver health assessments will take account of reasonable measures that the University and the driver could implement to ensure public safety.

Guidance for staff

Some prescription drugs and over the counter medicines can affect the skills needed to drive safely because they cause drowsiness, impaired judgement or lack of self-confidence.

Anyone who is unsure whether they meet driver fitness standards can check with the DVLA website, check with their GP, or seek advice from Occupational Health Services.