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Video Transcipts

Employee Quote

First and foremost employers are looking for individuals who can quickly adapt to a range of different environments whilst demonstrating professionalism and maturity. A willingness to learn and take on challenges both professionally and socially sets candidates apart and is a skill set often overlooked when preparing for respective careers. What struck me when speaking to researchers at the University of Warwick was that they had these qualities in abundance and they do need to plan to further develop these and actively promote them to potential employers.

I am a firm believer that above any academic achievements, work experience or hobbies, it is the person themselves who add the real value. The ability to seamlessly fit into a team working environment will always be attractive to employers and recognising one’s weaknesses as well as strengths is essential in order to understand who you are as a person when deciding on a potential career path.

The concept of a ‘rounded individual’ is important, but as well as this, demonstrating an open-minded and passionate approach to learning will set you apart from other candidates. Academic achievement, work experience and team participation all contribute to career success and it is the variety that provides the fruit and not the disciplines in isolation.

Research students at the University of Warwick have ultimately invested in their most valuable asset, themselves, and with the right guidance range of experiences and career planning this will set them in good stead for a successful career in any professional working environment.

Julie Gallimore

Hello, I’m Julie Gallimore, the Careers Consultant supporting researcher development here at The University of Warwick.

This workshop is designed to help you structure your career planning and to take action. It’ll help you to review progress and most importantly to take control and develop confidence in how you plan for the future. We’ll take you through a series of exercises, designed to help you review your unique skill set and your values. You’ll find this helpful when generating a CV or preparing for interview. This is because employers like to see evidence of your skill set and the ways you’re continually developing as a researcher. Previous research staff who’ve completed the module say that it’s helped them to develop career options and develop confidence in their own skill set.

We hope you find the workshop useful.