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Elias and Purcell table

 

Category Description General examples % of 21-35 yr olds holding a first degree % of 40-54 yr olds holding a first degree
Traditional Established professions for which, historically, the normal entry route has been via an undergraduate degree Solicitors

Doctors
Lecturers
Secondary teachers
Biological scientists
Biochemists

60+ 60+
Modern The newer professions (e.g. in management, IT and creative industries) Chartered accountants

Software engineers
Computer programmers
Primary teachers
Journalists

50+ 40+
New Areas of employment
to which graduates have been increasingly recruited in large numbers.
Marketing/sales

Physiotherapists
Clothing designers
Welfare officers

40+ in the younger group, plus the proportion is 10 or more %age points higher than in the 40-54
group (on average half as many hold first degrees in the older groups).
40+ in the younger group, plus the proportion is 10 or more %age points higher than in the 40-54
group (on average half as many hold first degrees in the older groups).
Niche

Majority non-graduate but stable or growing niches

Leisure managers

Midwives
Buyers (non-retail)
Sports coaches

A growing or stable proportion holds a degree, and there is a degree entry route into the occupation or ample scope for exercising degree level skills (on average 15 to 25% are degree holders in these roles). A growing or stable
proportion holds a degree, and there is a degree entry route into the occupation or ample scope for exercising degree level skills (on average 15 to 25% are degree holders in these roles).
Non-graduate Majority non-graduate

Sales assistants
Filing and record clerks
Travel agents

The proportion of graduates may be growing, stable or declining, but there is no degree route entry to the occupation or ample scope for exercising degree level skills (usually fewer than 12% of role holders are graduates). The proportion of graduates may be growing, stable or declining, but there is no degree route entry to the occupation or ample scope for exercising degree level skills (usually fewer than 12% of role holders are graduates).